IFR Training - no motivation.....

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by WDD, May 19, 2020.

  1. WDD

    WDD Line Up and Wait

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    Got my PPL Jan 1. Got the King course beginning of March. Jumped into it and burned out quickly! Not that the material is too hard. I'm just not in the game. I find myself flying on good weekends VFR and all. Not fired up about jumping back in for lessons; but I'm fully on board with the idea that I've got to get that skill.

    Options:
    1) Suck it up snow flake, grit your teeth and dig into it
    2) Take a year off and just enjoy flying around.
    3) Take an in person crash course to re start interest
     
  2. eman1200

    eman1200 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    do it when ur ready or else it won't be fun. it's actually supposed to be fun ya know, at least I think.

    I flew VFR for a few years before I mentally committed to doing IFR. of course my mental capacity is somewhat limited.
     
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  3. Dave Arata

    Dave Arata Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Suffering the same burnout working on the commercial rating. I've only got a couple checkride prep hours to do and the checkride itself, but I'm a bit numb when it comes to studying. I went straight from PPL to instrument and now commercial. If you need a break, you need a break. I'm planning on taking some time to just enjoy flying before I consider any further advanced ratings. It would be helpful if you were fresh for the instrument rating.
     
  4. Brad Z

    Brad Z Final Approach

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    I can understand. You just did a bunch of training and now just want to fly. You’re experience is not unusual at all. I went seven years between buying my instrument coursework and finally doing the training. Once you’ve done more XC flights and get a feel for how the system works, you’ll have more motivation to do the training.
     
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  5. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach

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    Go fly and have fun. Take a break from training.
     
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  6. GMascelli

    GMascelli En-Route

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    Go fly, build some cross country time, polish the skills. Once you accomplish those tasks, then hit the books and jump back into training.
     
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  7. WDD

    WDD Line Up and Wait

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    Sounds like I’m not that crazy after all.
     
  8. chemgeek

    chemgeek Pattern Altitude

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    I f you spend enough time as a VFR pilot getting weathered out, or encountering unpleasant MVFR conditions, your motivation for IFR training builds steadily. It took me 4 years and 400 hours to see the light...
     
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  9. PaulS

    PaulS Final Approach

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    Go fly. IFR rating is a slog, if you aren't motivated you won't get through. Fly vfr, when you start getting sick of getting weathered out you'll have more motivation.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2020
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  10. Dana

    Dana Pattern Altitude

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    If it's not fun don't do it. You say, "I've got to get that skill", but if you're enjoying weekend VFR do you really?
     
  11. Rgbeard

    Rgbeard Pattern Altitude

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    Just because your situation isn't unique, doesn't mean you're not crazy.

    Just sayin'.
     
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  12. PeterNSteinmetz

    PeterNSteinmetz Pattern Altitude

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    I sort of enjoyed IFR training and started pretty much right after my private. But I like that sort of technical stuff.

    Another thing I did was used a home simulator based on X-Plane to just practice the procedures and handling multiple things at once. Set the turbulence moderate so had to constantly handle the yoke and petals while dealing with the approach.

    But I agree with others - of you aren’t motivated, just fly VFR for now and enjoy. Motivation will come when it comes.
     
  13. Jumpmaster

    Jumpmaster Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yep -go fly. I started my instrument ground school twice. First time it was a weekly class at the FBO (for free) with some of the same ground instructors that did the private course. Really knowledgable folks. But work got in the way and half way through, I had to bail. Second time was an on-line course - Sporty’s. Seems like a decent course but same story- about 1/2 way through life got in the way again. I have about 20 hours of instrument time with around 10 in actual IMC. But for some reason, I just can’t seem to push or pull hard enough to get to the finish line. And I agree - it’s not something you can sleepwalk through - you need to be motivated and if you are not right now, that’s ok.
     
  14. MauleSkinner

    MauleSkinner Final Approach

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    Um...you’re HERE, aren’t you?:rolleyes:
     
  15. AU_James

    AU_James Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Figure out your "why."

    I didn't want to take as long as I did (am). I got my PPL 200 hours and 3+ years ago and Friday is my first IR flight lesson. I started course work multiple times and due to life events ended up stopping each time so far.

    However, I enjoy flying VFR and I LOVE flying cross countries with some purpose like seeing family, going on vacation, or pilot n paws. None of these can actually be remotely scheduled without the IR so there's my motivation. I also fully intend to fly VFR while going through the flight lessons to ensure I don't get burned out during the training.

    My current plan is to schedule at least one IFR lesson per week and either add another flight (be it VFR or IFR lesson). It's something I'm committing to so that I can stay encouraged, have fun, and still get this thing done in a reasonable time frame.

    So, figure out your "why" again, the rest will come. Good luck!
     
  16. Jim K

    Jim K Line Up and Wait

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    Go fly.... you'll find your reason.

    I took my family on a trip to Florida vfr. Took 5 hours down, and three days back due to low clouds that were could've easily flown over ifr. I HATED the 3 hours hood time during my private and figured I'd take a couple years off training, but that trip lit a fire under me. Got my written knocked out a month ago and starting training this afternoon. My instructor believes in getting in actual, hoping that's more fun than wearing the stupid hood.

    It's hard to go right back to school after the big exhale following your checkride. I don't know how the career path kids do it.
     
  17. MauleSkinner

    MauleSkinner Final Approach

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    Keep in mind that the opposite is often true as well...in all the years I flew my VFR airplane cross-country, I’ve only sat to wait out weather once where IFR wouldve been an option in any of the single engine airplanes I’ve flown.

    Apparently I only travel when icing or embedded thunderstorms exist. ;)
     
  18. MuseChaser

    MuseChaser Cleared for Takeoff

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    I've started my instrument training three times so far over the past ten years. I've prepared for the written twice over that time, getting to the point where I always scored above 90 (without doing the kill-and-drill approach... actually learning the material) easily, but never took the test. My problem is that there are SO many things I like to do that I can't seem to force myself to budget the amount of time it takes to just git'er done. I guess that IS just another way of saying the motivation isn't strong enough yet. If it was, I would probably force myself. The constant scheduling hassles (my life, more than the plane), coupled with a seemingly constant stream of reasons the plane is down for SOMETHING, kind of takes the joy out of going for the rating and makes it seem like more of a job. I had jobs. I don't want any more.

    I WILL get there.
     
  19. Jim K

    Jim K Line Up and Wait

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    Can't argue that, but in my case all three days would've been safe situations, even in the Dakota.

    First day was just low stratus, freezing level was well above the mea, weather at home was clear, so we could've gotten home that day. Made it to Georgia and had to find some place to land.

    Second day forecast thunderstorms in the afternoon, but clear in the morning. Unfortunately we had landed at a coastal airport, and half the runway was foggy. An instrument clearance could've gotten us out (although later I realized I could've used svfr). As it was, we left around noon and then had to spend more time dodging the storms. There were areas that would've been safe to go through, but we had to go around until we found a hole.

    Finally day three, there was a 200' thick layer at 1500 agl. We flew above it in the sunshine until it started to go from broken to overcast about an hour from home. Dropped through the last hole we could see and scud ran in the gray, dismal turbulence the rest of the way. Staying above would've been more pleasant and safer, but rules are rules.

    That said, I don't regret the experience at all. It was a great adventure. I'd recommend a long vfr cross country to anyone if you have a flexible enough schedule to not be tempted to do something unsafe.
     
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  20. JCranford

    JCranford En-Route

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  21. AU_James

    AU_James Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Completely agree here. A couple of years ago I took a week and went with my wife and dog from Ohio to visit family in DC then to visit family in Atlanta, then back to Ohio. It was around Christmas/New Years so the weather was ALL over the place. Things went really well for us until it was time to get back to Ohio. First day we cancelled but could have flown very safely above a layer if I had my IR. Second day we waited long enough to know we could get most of the flight done and then weather closed up an hour from home, at night, and I made the in-air decision to just land the plane ASAP (saw visible freezing moisture in the lights, got on the ground to assess).

    Now I understand that having my IR probably would have gotten me home on the original date, but that having my IR also could have made the decision harder on the second day. It's important to know that even with the rating, you may not want to fly anyway.
     
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  22. MauleSkinner

    MauleSkinner Final Approach

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    You need to tell the whole joke, not just the punch line...
    “Poop jokes are the highest form of humor. My daughter disagrees, but she will admit that they’re a solid #2.”

    :D
     
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  23. Ravioli

    Ravioli Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    I decided Covid lockdown was the time to finally get back to IFR cert. (I started years ago and my written has long since expired)

    So far I've gotten as far as buying the GoldMethod subscription. Fortunately I got the 2-year option!!
     
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  24. Doug Reid

    Doug Reid Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Take your time...fly and have fun...when you are ready, go for it !
     
  25. steingar

    steingar Taxi to Parking

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    Screw the OP. I got motivation coming out my six. What I don't got is ca$h.
     
  26. MauleSkinner

    MauleSkinner Final Approach

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    There's a really good poop joke in there somewhere...:rolleyes:
     
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  27. Martin Pauly

    Martin Pauly Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Why do you feel you need to get the instrument rating? Honestly, you don't! Just have fun flying VFR.

    If after some time you figure out you want more, that's where your motivation will come from. Until then, IFR is a ton of work and should not be taken lightly.

    - Martin
     
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  28. MacFlier

    MacFlier Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I went straight from PPL to IR training and after a while, decided that I needed to stop and see the world VFR.
    Now, I do that every now and then between IR training so I don't get burned out.
    I'm 1 hour of hood time from meeting all the requirements.
    For me, the motivation was those days where VFR was not possible, but I could punch thru the thin layer of clouds on an IFR clearance and be on my way.
     
  29. WannFly

    WannFly Final Approach

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    I just started my 3rd time IFR journey in 3 years
     
  30. Pugs

    Pugs Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I waited about 6 months after the PPL to start the instrument. Did a lot of cross country flying from the Mid-Atlantic up through New England. Got stuck at the beach in RI for an extra day once. Cancelled a couple trips I could have made with an IR. = motivation. (use Flight following on the trips)

    Did the Sporty's course in Dec and then the instrument with the same instructor I did the private with Jan-April. If I had to do it again.

    1) I'd do the same 6 months between PPL. You'll learn a whole lot in that time especially if you get the X/C time which you need for the Inst ticket anyway.
    2) I'd fly with a buddy a few times in that 6 months as a safety pilot and start to do some goggle time and work basic scan and maneuvers. No need to overdo it. Just go to breakfast someplace and then on the way over or back do 20 minutes or so of time with the googles/hood on.
    3) Do some approaches WITHOUT the VLD. Just so the control movement / instrument reaction starts to make sense. It helps get all the buttonology down too.
    4) Go to a 10 day / two week IFR course someplace. Most of the good ones work some time out so plan 6 months ahead of time.
     
  31. frfly172

    frfly172 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Getting your IFR will extend your flying options. Gives you the ability to be not stuck in boring places do to weather. Definitely worth it if you fly cross countries.
     
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  32. Hang 4

    Hang 4 Line Up and Wait

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    I had about an 18 month gap from PP to IR. Similar experience to a lot of prior posters. Flew a lot, including some very long XC flights. Got very lucky with weather and accommodating controllers. Flew with flight following on most longer XC's and got used to being in the system and what the ATC part of IFR was like. Also got very familiar with my GPS, AP and EFB app. Took an accelerated IR course and had some real ups and downs over the 8 days. I work hard at staying proficient, though that can be a bit tough in FL during the spring and summer.

    I'm very glad I got the rating, but I'm also very glad I waited and got more comfortable with my plane, avionics and ATC before getting the rating.
     
  33. Ryan F.

    Ryan F. Line Up and Wait

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    I do a fair amount of practical tests for pilots on an accelerated training track. Someone asked me recently about the "perfect" way to train a pilot in a theoretical world in which there were no cost or time constraints.

    In my mind it would be fairly simple -- fly at least one hundred hours (100-200 would be the truly useful range, but 100 minimum) utilizing the certificate or rating just achieved before moving on.

    In my subjective view there is no more valuable time to learn and grow as a pilot than directly after earning a private pilot certificate. In my vision of how best to build a complete and well-rounded pilot, the assignment would be for that pilot to fly VFR across the country (maybe even some light international travel towards the end of the time) dealing with all the usual challenges faced by VFR-only pilots. Weather, mechanical issues, challenging airspace, having to make an unexpected stop and wait out a frontal system, and so on. Back in the day that would have (and did) include stopping at a flight service station, doing a tour of a tower cab, spending a day or two shadowing a mechanic performing an annual or 100-hour inspection, etc. All of the little details which gives context and understanding to the knowledge and skills recently gained.

    The same assignment would take place after earning the instrument rating. File and go -- based on personal minimums which are carefully but continuously reduced to a level at which the instrument rating is a highly useful tool. Seek out safe ways to increase the comfort factor with weather which was once considered dangerously challenging, but can be whittled down to a manageable bite-sized chunk with exposure. Get a few tune-up flights with instructors during this time to correct any bad habits creeping in.

    Of course, in the real world, this could take years to accomplish. In the modern professional pilot training track these are luxuries which are simply unaffordable for most.

    For part-time, GA pilots, it is possible, though... if you're not on a timetable to complete training, take advantage of the time you do have to flesh out the skills you've most recently learned before moving on.
     
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  34. Bill Jennings

    Bill Jennings Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    I started right after a really rough day coming back from one of the early Gastons flyins. I literally called my CFII on Monday morning after that bad Sunday flight.
     
  35. drummer4468

    drummer4468 Filing Flight Plan

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    Totally understand the burnout feelings. Currently in instrument training now and 40-60 hours under a hood/foggles, learning far more complex procedures, right after the "honeymoon" of finally earning your PPL is absolutely no joke. It's intense and demanding, especially for someone like me, in a college program doing IR to commercial to CFI/CFII all in rapid succession.

    Like others here have said, it's important to keep in touch with why you want to get your IR in the first place.
    As for me, I'm motivated by a few things:
    1) Living in coastal Maine, cloudy/foggy-but-otherwise-smooth weather is common, and was a huge frustration while working on my PPL. I was already eager to start IFR after my first few cancelled private lessons.
    2) Now, well into IR training, I enjoy how much better of a pilot it has made me. Holding altitudes and headings as if I'm on rails has become muscle-memory and makes XCs much more enjoyable. Not to mention how the mental workout has strengthened my brain and VASTLY improved my overall situational awareness. Sure it's always fun lazily buzzing around VFR and not caring too much about my course etc, but it's much nicer being more tuned-in and not constantly making large course and altitude corrections from being sloppy.

    Make sure to keep some VFR flying in your training flow as well. Putting foggles on every time you get in a plane becomes a slog and makes you forget why you're working so hard. Get out and fly a few hours a month outside of lessons, just for the love of flying. Or even just run a couple laps around the pattern at the start of your instrument lessons. Really helps to break it up and keep your head in the game. Maybe even shoot a few approaches VFR, that helps situational awareness too(so you're more in touch with what a 1- or 2-dot deflection of the LOC needle looks like in the "real" world).

    Best of luck!
     
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  36. smv

    smv Cleared for Takeoff

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    15264.jpeg
     
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  37. Challenged

    Challenged Pattern Altitude

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    Timely. I just decided to try and finish up my IR and I've been studying constantly for the past week or so. Honestly I'm a little concerned that it's just a license to get myself in trouble. The weather here today:

    Walk_in_the_Park.png
     
  38. smv

    smv Cleared for Takeoff

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    One of the biggest bubble bursters for new pilots is learning that an instrument certificate is not a ticket to fly anytime, anywhere.

    "I cannot wait to get my 'IFR License' so I can fly whenever I want!" is something I have heard many times... :(
     
  39. Jamie Kirk

    Jamie Kirk Line Up and Wait

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    Book part of IFR sucks and drags on. Bores the crap out of me.

    Now flying IFR is awesome, I love the lessons.

    I just can’t get myself to read the Sheppard Air 1000s of questions and the Kings course put me to sleep b
     
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  40. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    Just fly VFR for a while. When you go, try to get flight following as much as possible. It will help you a great deal with your IFR when you choose to pursue it to already have a high comfort level talking with ATC.