IFR Training Cessna 172 G1000 vs Round dials?

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Cjayfly1
I would like to see if anyone has recently completed their Instrument training using round dials? If so, how was your experience? I am currently finishing up the private licenses and wanted to see the different opinions and gain knowledge from each and everyone of you. I know a lot of people are utilizing g1000's but all of my training so far has been completed in the round dials.

If you have completed instrument training recently, how is the g1000 and the learning of the system?
 
There's nothing wrong with either system. They display the same basic information, they just do it differently. My advice would be to complete your instrument training in an airplane that has instruments similar to what you'll be flying with after the checkride is complete rather than obsess over glass vs. steam.
 
If you have access to a solid IFR airplane with Round Dial and a good navigator, and a quality CFII that can teach you well, go with that.

In my area, you can save considerable rental costs by not going with a G1000.
 
Scott Best (@SbestCFII) is a well respected CFII that teaches a lot of IFR students in his accelerated course. I am curious about his answer to this question.
 
Thank you for the information. It's much appreciated! I'm 99.9999% sure i will fill the round dial after the instrument training. As a new pilot in training thank you for all the advice you all provide.
 
If you have access to a solid IFR airplane with Round Dial and a good navigator, and a quality CFII that can teach you well, go with that.

In my area, you can save considerable rental costs by not going with a G1000.

I would agree with this advice. Whichever costs less would be my choice. More important is to find a CFI who knows how to teach and has experience in IFR. I've been working with an IFR student who has mic fright when talking to ATC, and forgets critical things like extending the landing gear. But he is great at uncontrolled fields. It turns out his previous CFI avoided talking to ATC. That boggles my mind. IFR is a choreographed dance with ATC. I can't see how one can train to work in the system without talking to ATC.
 
No thoughts on the difference, other than with the glass be sure to do all the on-line classes before you waste hobbes hours being befuddled with all that glass.

But you should be aware that if your check ride plane has a working ADF, then you may have to have to demonstrate your ability to bird dog. If the plane is equipped with a working DME, then you’re going to have to demonstrate flying a DME arc. The key word is “working.” Put a bullet through both instruments before your check ride.
 
What are you going to be flying after the checkride? Glass or round dials? Train in what you’re going to fly. In the end, it doesn’t matter. You can transition to either one once you’re done with your training.
 
The only negative is the DG will process and you have to align with the compass about every 20 minutes. If the plane you are using is a training aircraft the it may be less time.
 
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The only negative is the DG will process and you have to align with the compass about every 20 minutes. pic the plane you are using is a training aircraft the it may be less time.
There is a smarta** comment in there but I can’t come up with it at the moment. :)
 
If you are going G1000 route, spend the money and get a online course from sporty’s , costs a lot less than Hobbs . There are a lot of buttons to turn on that screen which is bigger and far better than the first computer monitor I had lol
 
In the middle of IFR training right now. I’m learning on steam gages.

1- Steam gauges are cheaper to rent.

2- In future when flying different airplanes, it will be easier to go from dials to glass vs vice versa from what I’ve been told.
 
In the middle of IFR training right now. I’m learning on steam gages.

1- Steam gauges are cheaper to rent.

2- In future when flying different airplanes, it will be easier to go from dials to glass vs vice versa from what I’ve been told.

Actually if you are operating a very active flight school G5s are less expensive than vac. You have less instrument repair cost and aircraft down time. Primary instruction is rather hard on gyros.
 
Must be nice! Around here it is at least a $50 / hour premium for glass.
 
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