FCC radio license

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Cjayfly1
looking for information to apply for the fcc radio license! Thank you
 
The FCC does not presently require a license for Aviation Radio installations in aircraft, where those are VHF and UHF, HF transmissions require a license. These are covered in Part 87 of the FCC regulations. Travel outside the US requires a station license, the ICAO Standard specifically states a radio station license and operator’s permit are required if the aircraft is equipped with radios.
 
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There are two licenses that go with a radio: Your station license (sort of equivalent to the your aircraft registration) and the operator license (sort of like your pilot certificate).

Neither are needed for domestic VHF/UHF use any more.

If you are flying internationally, you technically need both. @Half Fast posted the forms, but you might find it easier to create a ULS account and file it there. It costs money in both cases.

Amusingly, my operator license is free (I carry both General Radiotelephone and Radiotelegraph licenses), but I had to take tests to get them.
 
Amusingly, my operator license is free (I carry both General Radiotelephone and Radiotelegraph licenses), but I had to take tests to get them.

I had to pay for my amateur license AND take tests, but when I was a volunteer examiner giving the tests we weren't allowed to charge any fee, because we were amateurs. :rolleyes:
 
I took my first Amateur tests and the third and second phone at the FCC for free. My Amateur Extra exam I paid some nominal fee with the VEC program. I spent many years as the liaison for the Vienna Wireless Society exams.

The Ameteur Extra got me out of the code portion of the commercial radiotelegraph license. I took it through PSI at the local A&P school a few years back.
 
To clarify, ICAO requires them if you fly across an international border, even when neither country on either side of the border requires them. For example neither Canada nor the USA does. That said, you should have both licenses just in case, even though the likelihood is slim that anyone in the USA or in Canada will ask for them. Once you get them they're good for about 10 years IIRC.

IME, flying between WA state and Canada for the past 15 years (including twice earlier this year) I've been asked for these licenses exactly 1 time back in 2008, by US Customs after returning home.
 
To clarify, ICAO requires them if you fly across an international border, even when neither country on either side of the border requires them. For example neither Canada nor the USA does.
In many places, you needed them whether you crossed a border or not. This was the way the US was up unitl 1996, and is the way Canada is today. Actually, it's the ITU that is the operative agency, but ICAO indicates the requirement by reference.

In the US 47 CFR 87.89 exempts the requirement for an operator license for VHF telephony used domestically as well as for things like DME and transponders no matter where you are. 87.18 exempts you from a station license if you are operating in a way that avoids international communications (i.e., VHF) or international operations.

It is true that the only people often who asked about them are overly obnoxious US customs guys, but that doesn't make them not required. You need your restricted (or better) and station license to fly to Canada.
 
There are two licenses that go with a radio: Your station license (sort of equivalent to the your aircraft registration) and the operator license (sort of like your pilot certificate).

Neither are needed for domestic VHF/UHF use any more.

If you are flying internationally, you technically need both. @Half Fast posted the forms, but you might find it easier to create a ULS account and file it there. It costs money in both cases.

Amusingly, my operator license is free (I carry both General Radiotelephone and Radiotelegraph licenses), but I had to take tests to get them.
For my trips through Canada you do need a "station license" for the aircraft.
I had my free Radio Telephone Operators certificate from the 1970s. I did not have to pay for a new certificate.
I was never asked to produce the certificate or station license.
 
Again, not being asked for one, doesn't mean it's not required. Your N-registered plane does need a station license to operate in Canada. Canadian planes already have them.
 
Again, not being asked for one, doesn't mean it's not required. Your N-registered plane does need a station license to operate in Canada. Canadian planes already have them.
I didn't say it wasn't required. I said I was never asked to present it. Canadian Customs was always a phone call, never in person.
 
Canada stopped requiring licenses for the aircraft's radios in Canadian airplanes at least 20 years ago.
 
Only need if flying international, there’s one for the pilot (no expiry but the fee goes up every now and then), and one for the aircraft (forgot how long it’s good for maybe 5 or 10 year), however most people say it’s not checked for. I got both, and never presented it once.
 
I just went through the process. The FCC website is quite painful to use and navigate, but there are plenty of websites and also YouTube videos which help guide you through the process.

Approval and issuance were quick. I just downloaded the restricted radiotelephone operator permit (RR) about 24 hours after requesting it.

As @flyingron said, you need TWO of those: one for the aircraft (radio station) and one for the pilot (radio operator).

- Martin
 
I just went through the process. The FCC website is quite painful to use and navigate, but there are plenty of websites and also YouTube videos which help guide you through the process.
This is how to say you are going to the Bahamas without saying you are going to the Bahamas.
 
Having just went to the Bahamas I can say nobody mentioned or asked for anything pertaining to FCC stuff. Not coming or going. If the OP question even had anything to do with the Bahamas. Haha
 
Just purchased one for our new company aircraft. It was about like I remembered; the process does require a little care, but really it's not too bad.
 
Having just went to the Bahamas I can say nobody mentioned or asked for anything pertaining to FCC stuff. Not coming or going. If the OP question even had anything to do with the Bahamas. Haha

Even if nobody routinely asks, it's one of those pieces of paper whose absence can be a big 'thing' if you run into the wrong local official who has a checklist to work off.
 
I donated my money to the FCC set everything up last week and still havent received my email with number!!!!!!!!
 
i think its one of those that is supposedly required - and potentially to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
 
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