What to do after a PPL?

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piperpilot
Hello Everyone,

I am 17, and a new private pilot as of yesterday! I am hoping to do R-ATP at a Part-141 college program after the completion of my senior year. In the meantime, I would like to be productive, and pursue further ratings that wouldn’t disqualify me from the R-ATP. I have come up with complex/high performance, tailwheel, spin, multi-engine, and acrobatic. My goal is to become a professional pilot, either flying an airline, cargo, or corporate job. Could anyone please advise as to what would be the best ratings to pursue before I go Part-141 and start my Instrument Rating? Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 
Read through the commercial requirements and check off as many as you can. Right now is a good time to get your 10 night takeoffs and landing at a towered field and the 5 hours of night. Any time you are flying solo more than 300 nm make at least 3 landings.
If you are flying just for fun, land at least 50 nm away to get the 50 hours in cross-country flight time.
This time of year is also good to get the 2-hour cross country flight day and night with an instructor out of the way. Plan a flight that is out 2 hours during the day and back at night.
These hours never expire so it doesn’t matter if you go for your commercial certificate in 2 years or 20.
Also go up with an instructor and learn the commercial maneuvers. They are a lot of fun.
 
My son is 17 and in exactly the same boat. He got his ASES as his first follow-on and is working on the same endorsement list as you are. Plus some fun flying, cross country looking for food.

What JScarry posted is very good advice too. In school, some of the requirements are logistically difficult, especially in the bigger programs. knock them out on your timeline.

He was advised to avoid the multi. Depending what program you go to the 60 hour requirement might get tight without the Multi course. And the general wisdom is to get the multi after the instrument and commercial, and since those are the disqualifying courses it doesn't make sense. Of course, "familiarization" flights are fun.

What schools?
 
The SES rating is all fun and almost no work, IMHO. It's mostly about boating in an airplane, no so much about flying one. I think you'll learn more useful skills mastering tailwheel and glider, probably not in that order. And you don't necessarily need to get the rating or endorsement to benefit from the instruction.

I took an aerobatic course immediately after getting my PP certificate. If nothing else, you quickly learn how much of a beating the plane can take without coming apart.
 
Just out of curiosity, what would be disqualifying for a R-ATP?
Not as though it technically disqualifies, a lot of curriculums from various institutions don’t want their students to come in with more than a Private ticket. I think it’s more of a money grab than anything.
 
Not as though it technically disqualifies, a lot of curriculums from various institutions don’t want their students to come in with more than a Private ticket. I think it’s more of a money grab than anything.
Nope.

You must get the Commercial and Instrument at an approved college program.

Citation for eligibility in CFR 61.160 (b) (3).
....
(3) Holds a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and instrument rating if:
(i) The required ground training was completed as part of an approved part 141 curriculum at the institution of higher education;
(ii) The required flight training was completed as part of an approved part 141 curriculum at the institution of higher education or at a part 141 pilot school that has a training agreement under § 141.26 of this chapter with the institution of higher education
 
I think you have plenty of good options. I think the main thing is gain some hours and have some fun while you do it. As life gets busy when we get older, you’re not going to have the same time.

I’d suggest getting some of those endorsements like tail wheel, complex/high performance, etc.

I’d also recommend Jscarry’s approach. Take a peak at those hour requirements for commercial and start plugging away with some fun destination cross country flights. You build the hours and can find some fun places to check out along the way.

Best of luck to you!!!


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Nope.

You must get the Commercial and Instrument at an approved college program.

Citation for eligibility in CFR 61.160 (b) (3).
....
(3) Holds a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and instrument rating if:
(i) The required ground training was completed as part of an approved part 141 curriculum at the institution of higher education;
(ii) The required flight training was completed as part of an approved part 141 curriculum at the institution of higher education or at a part 141 pilot school that has a training agreement under § 141.26 of this chapter with the institution of higher education
I stand corrected.
 
Just fly. Get some experience going places and doing things without the structure of training. Try different planes, eg low wing vs high wing. Take some friends flying.

If you really feel the need to always be working towards something, tailwheel is easy, inexpensive, fast, fun, and available everywhere. It also opens the door to various vintage, EAB, and aerobatic aircraft.
 
Just fly. Get some experience going places and doing things without the structure of training. Try different planes, eg low wing vs high wing. Take some friends flying.

If you really feel the need to always be working towards something, tailwheel is easy, inexpensive, fast, fun, and available everywhere. It also opens the door to various vintage, EAB, and aerobatic aircraft.
This is what I was thinking, fly some hours and do as much as you can like Ed said.
 
Practically no experience can be taken INTO a 141 syllabus. 25 percent MAXIMUM….

So… ditto on glider, seaplane and aero.

However, KNOWING how to control an aircraft by reference to instruments will make your life easier.

Added extra sim and actual instrument time bolsters your resume, as does cross country and night time. Won’t help with speeding up your 141 experience, but valuable in the long run.
 
Hello Everyone,

I am 17, and a new private pilot as of yesterday! I am hoping to do R-ATP at a Part-141 college program after the completion of my senior year. In the meantime, I would like to be productive, and pursue further ratings that wouldn’t disqualify me from the R-ATP. I have come up with complex/high performance, tailwheel, spin, multi-engine, and acrobatic. My goal is to become a professional pilot, either flying an airline, cargo, or corporate job. Could anyone please advise as to what would be the best ratings to pursue before I go Part-141 and start my Instrument Rating? Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Unless there is a financial reason for going to an aviation college, my suggestion would be to knock out your Instrument rating and the training for your commercial so you can take that checkride as soon as you turn 18. Then get your CFI and get paid to flight instruct while getting your college degree in something else. You can still get your r-ATP at 21, just with 1500 hours.
 
Get out and fly to some new areas, get some quality xc,
Work on your commercial requirements, Get your IFR.
 
Agree with the Glider, Tailwheel, Seaplane and Aerobatics.

Since most aerobatic aircraft are tailwheel, you can sort of combine those two.

And all of them are fun and will make you a better pilot.
 
Hello Everyone,

I am 17, and a new private pilot as of yesterday! I am hoping to do R-ATP at a Part-141 college program after the completion of my senior year. In the meantime, I would like to be productive, and pursue further ratings that wouldn’t disqualify me from the R-ATP. I have come up with complex/high performance, tailwheel, spin, multi-engine, and acrobatic. My goal is to become a professional pilot, either flying an airline, cargo, or corporate job. Could anyone please advise as to what would be the best ratings to pursue before I go Part-141 and start my Instrument Rating? Any and all feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Fly.
 
I would be disqualified from R-ATP at a collegiate Part-141 program if I did any of the following:
-Instrument Written or Practical Test
-Commercial Written or Practical Test

The other issue is that they would make me restart my training towards any given rating. Meaning if I started my instrument rating and got through VORS, holds, vectors, and approaches Part-61, I would have to re-do it all in a collegiate Part-141, regardless of school or program.

From the research I have done and who I’ve spoken to (including all of you on POA, thank you for the input and advice), I think the best course of action will be to do the tail wheel endorsement to refine my stick and rudder skills, and the high performance/complex in a 182RG my flight school offers, which will force me to stay ahead of the aircraft and fly something with more complex systems. I think both of those will give me valuable experience that a more forgiving aircraft such as a C172 or a PA28 hasn’t given me. Additionally to that I think knocking out some of the instrument and commercial requirements such as 50xc hours for instrument and 300nm xc for commercial would be smart.

Thank you all again for the advice and knowledge, and I would love to hear more to better inform me when it comes to these types of decisions. Great experience on POA so far!

Tailwinds,
 
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Good plan. Would definitely take advantage of 182RG since you have access. Combination of TW, HP, and complex endorsements will greatly expand the number of aircraft you can fly.
 
Commit to landing at every available airport in your state. If you live in a teeny, tiny colonial state, perhaps commit to airports in multiple states. ;)
 
You could also get your sport pilot CFI… and try to get paid hours faster!
 
Commit to landing at every available airport in your state. If you live in a teeny, tiny colonial state, perhaps commit to airports in multiple states. ;)

In some states that will earn you a nice leather flight jacket. I know that VA and MD have those programs.
 
Maryland only has 32 airports listed on AirNav.
My home state of Washington has 119. At last count I've bagged 90.
I guess in some ways it pays to live in tiny, flat state. ;)
 
Now that my aircraft is restored, I'm shooting for all 50 states. Not a professional flyer, so it will take some planning and effort. I think 3 trips can get the rest of the 48. One to PNW, one to SW, one to NE.
 
Now that my aircraft is restored, I'm shooting for all 50 states. Not a professional flyer, so it will take some planning and effort. I think 3 trips can get the rest of the 48. One to PNW, one to SW, one to NE.

HI is going to be the challenge to get to.
 
If you can’t get your ifr, at least be a safety pilot for an ifr pilot, being immersed into the ifr system can really add to you skills and knowledge
 
ND has a passport/jacket program. We have 89 public use airports and you also need to visit both air museums (KFAR and KMOT) and get signatures to show you have attended 3 FAA safety seminars. Only a couple of the airports were sketchy.

As far as things you can do without wasting instruction or exams toward your instrument rating or commercial certificate, I think the tailwheel endorsement and just-for-fun ratings like glider and seaplane are a good idea. But mostly, just fly a lot, solo or with anyone who will fly with you or let you fly right seat with them. And don’t fly the same hour twice if you can help it.
 
Just fly. Get some experience going places and doing things without the structure of training. Try different planes, eg low wing vs high wing. Take some friends flying.

If you really feel the need to always be working towards something, tailwheel is easy, inexpensive, fast, fun, and available everywhere. It also opens the door to various vintage, EAB, and aerobatic aircraft.
Ed is spot on. You'll need 50 hours X Country to qualify for instrument anyway. College will be there for you soon enough. Have fun, go fly.

Additional Thoughts:
1) Although you have your ticket now, not a bad idea to go up once a month with your CFI to continue to polish / solidify your training.
2) Get your 1st class medical now. IF there is any "turbulence" you might run into getting it, get that all straightened out now. That way you won't have a surprise down time in college, etc.
 
I have a first class medical so I am all set on that. What do you mean by challenging flights to build experience? Ops into bravo airspace or SFRA’s? My goal is just to build experience, log 50 hours xc time for IFR, and tailwheel/complex/high performance. Right now I fly at KBAF, which is Delta airspace with another delta directly to the east of BAF, and neighboring charlie about 5 miles south of the delta.
 
is their a reason you definitely want the R-ATP route ? The final place he wants to go is going to require ATP. And he will have some hourly benefits, but age will rule him out. And between 17-22 years - its a lot of time to just be eligible to get the full ATP. I ask because many places require ATP anyhow, and your options for being hired early with an R-ATP are kind of limited. So is it really worth it ? But this also assumes that you are willing to explore the non-141 R-ATP options that are available - notably a much cheaper option going through part 61 vs 141. but that option doesnt allow unrestricted loans. If college is something you want - get a 4 year degree - be a student - learn/educate and continue to work and get your ratings through the 4 years. Hell, I know college students who are CFI's at nearby airports (not affiliated with the university). But get a "real" degree from a college.

Now if college isnt for you - totally get it. You're just using the college for loans to get your flight certs and end up with a lower grade ATP (for awhile) and a lower rate college degree - but you'll get it done together. Which is understandable. The only "college affiliated" flight school I would say doesnt qualify under not as good would be Purdue. But rumor is their flight school is a bit of a mess as well (as many are).
 
Maryland only has 32 airports listed on AirNav.
My home state of Washington has 119. At last count I've bagged 90.
I guess in some ways it pays to live in tiny, flat state. ;)
VA has 66.
 
HI is going to be the challenge to get to.

Hard to do you your own plane. Otherwise, fly commercial and do an island checkout/sight seeing flight.

I have been checked out in HNL a few times. Last time was DA-40. Did a nice fun flight to Lanai and some sight seeing. GF rode in the back.
 
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