Retirement: inside or outside the USA?

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by G-Man, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    16,111
    Location:
    kojc, kixd, k34
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matthew
    Other than gun control laws and the State and Federal government interactions on those issues, I think that a lot of the rest of those infrastructure problems are local or State responsibilities. Quality of life issues in the US do depend on where you live. I’m not sure the best way to compare apples to apples when comparing QOL and infrastructure between the US and other countries.
     
    wsuffa likes this.
  2. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    51,971
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    DenverPilot
    You probably won’t need that one in retirement. ;)
     
  3. ArnoldPalmer

    ArnoldPalmer Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2015
    Messages:
    160
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    ArnoldPalmer
    Colleague of mine - ex-mil and now works for the state of MN - who has some decent bennies, is looking at Guatemala or Ecuador.

    I have a feeling I'll be doing the same. But who the heck knows where we will be in the next 30 years?

    Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
     
  4. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    There are no German restaurants in Germany (according to me). Lots of Italian and (where I live) Turkish. Very few German.
     
  5. Dave Theisen

    Dave Theisen En-Route PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    3,021
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dave Theisen
    I come from mostly German heritage. So I was excited when I started traveling to Germany for work, but disappointed so far that I haven’t found any of the dishes my grandmother used to make when I was a kid.
     
  6. Lance F

    Lance F En-Route PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,585
    Location:
    GA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Lance F
    Germany? No German restaurants ? You guys didn’t try very hard or only stayed in big city tourist areas. There are family owned restaurants serving traditional German fare in virtually every German village I’ve ever been in. And I’ve been in a lot of them. And it’s delicious.
    But no interest in retiring there
     
    Velocity173 and TCABM like this.
  7. wsuffa

    wsuffa Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    22,473
    Location:
    DC Suburbs
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Bill S.
    Oh, yes, states have a big part in it, but so much funding comes from the Feds that it has become a Federal issue, too. That's for the government-run infrastructure, as well as education, health care, and other services. I am reminded of the 4 minute piece of video that went viral from the HBO series Newsroom a couple of years ago.

    We are in agreement that it's really hard to compare QOL and infrastructure on a country-by-country basis - you really need to look at the states.

    Cato Institute did a ranking of "freedom" in the 50 states. While one may or may not agree with Cato's overall ranking, they also broke out many of the components of the ranking. I suppose that's a place to start when comparing QOL between a given state and other countries. Or not.
     
  8. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    Well, I live in Germany soooo.....just sayin.
     
  9. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    Ok, let me qualify my statement. There are plenty of places for me to get wurst (sausage). Currywurst, bratwurst, etc. We have places to get Kassler brötchen too. But finding a place to get some traditional hackbraten with knödel is hard to find. Want some saumagen? Don’t know where to point you to besides my company cafeteria.

    But I can quickly find Thai, Chinese, Pizza, Döner, Turkish kebabs, Italian or many other things.
     
  10. Dave Theisen

    Dave Theisen En-Route PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    3,021
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dave Theisen
    Whereabouts? We usually bounce around to a few places each trip over.
     
  11. Fallsrider

    Fallsrider Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2018
    Messages:
    556
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Fallsrider
    Priorities!
     
    N747JB likes this.
  12. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    13,538
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    weilke
    Those are 'german american' items that you would only find in a german restaurant in the US (the equivalent of 'General Tsos Chicken').

    There are indeed very few traditional german restaurants left. That's mainly a result of labor law and the labor market. Even places that may still have a traditional 'gasthaus' style marquee are often run by greek, serbian and lately syrian proprietors.
     
  13. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    Messages:
    5,216
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    SoonerAviator
    Is this lack of German fare similar to finding a true Scotsman? lol.
     
    denverpilot likes this.
  14. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    Heidelberg....until April.
     
  15. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    You think saumagen is American German? Find me one American who has ever eaten saumagen.
     
  16. wsuffa

    wsuffa Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    22,473
    Location:
    DC Suburbs
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Bill S.
    One here. Not that I care to again (it's in the same category as haggis, blutwurst, and boudin noir). Just not tasty to me. But I have had it.
     
  17. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    13,538
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    weilke
    Find me a german under 70 who has.

    It is something you may get at a 'Schlachtfest' event which some civic organizations may put on as a fundraiser. You slaughter a few pigs and eat every bit of meat that can be turned into some kind of sausage.
    German american restaurants reflect the cuisine that was common during the period of german migration to the US. They have no relation to what you would get in a upscale german restaurant today.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2020
    wsuffa likes this.
  18. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2016
    Messages:
    1,649
    Location:
    Illinois / Germany
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    NRG
    Everyone who works for me has had it. All under 70. They serve it in our cafeteria. ;)
     
  19. wsuffa

    wsuffa Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    22,473
    Location:
    DC Suburbs
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Bill S.
  20. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    51,971
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    DenverPilot
    Well, that’s one sure way to kill the staff off. LOL. :)
     
    wayne likes this.
  21. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2009
    Messages:
    51,971
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    DenverPilot
  22. n2230b

    n2230b Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2012
    Messages:
    205
    Location:
    SouthFlatistan
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    fast eddie
    Oh, I forgot, don’t drink the tap water in Turkey, don’t say “Putin’s grandmother wears army boots” in Russia and don’t call the Malvinas the Falklands in Argentina. In fact, don’t say anything about Putin’s grandmother anywhere.
     
  23. sourdough44

    sourdough44 Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,890
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    WI Flyer
    I’ll be staying in the USA, maybe evaluating the corners a bit. Nothing wrong with international travel, even for extended periods.

    Anyone still civil with family & friends will have a visit or 3 to schedule.
     
  24. Caramon13

    Caramon13 Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    Messages:
    2,255
    Location:
    Sarasota, FL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Romeo
    Sounds a little like scrapple, which cannot be found here in FL but was pretty common in PA where I'm from originally.
     
    denverpilot likes this.
  25. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    13,538
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    weilke
    It also doesn't say how many of them are there because corporate sent them or because they went 'home' to take care of a family member. Those data mining click-bait articles are near meaningless (the other day I saw one that touted Williston, ND as one of the states 'hidden gems' ).
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2020
    denverpilot likes this.
  26. flyingcheesehead

    flyingcheesehead Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    23,324
    Location:
    UQACY, WI
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    iMooniac
    Normally if you ask for sweet tea up here in the snow belt you'll get "Uh, you mean you want sugar in it?" as the reply. Most people up here have not experienced the delicious supersaturated concoction that is real sweet tea.

    Sure we do. We just call them "restaurants". Or, more often, "Diners".

    What is American? Turkey, roast beast, mashed potatoes, etc... And while I like it now and then, if you compare it with other cuisines, it's pretty bland and boring. No wonder we have so many "foreign" restaurants. Of course, we also have plenty of immigrants to open those foreign restaurants. I'm really glad that on any given day I can choose from Mexican, Thai, Greek, Chinese, Indian, or one of the varieties of "American" food (BBQ, burgers, sandwiches, chicken wings, steak, etc). I can't imagine living life on one cuisine.
     
  27. wilkersk

    wilkersk Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,626
    Location:
    Puget Sound
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    KennyW
    Real Yankee Pot Roast? Philly Cheesesteaks? Cheeseburgers, Pizza, Chili, Fried Chicken (the real stuff not the hormone and antibiotic stuffed superchicken). Porkchops, mashed potatoes and gravy. Oh, ....I could go on, and on, and on...... Having lived on the economy in other countries, I have a deep and abiding appreciation for 'merican! ...........Shrimp-n-grits, po'boys, Fried Catfish, Macaroni and cheese, Hush Puppies, .......
     
    455 Bravo Uniform likes this.
  28. flyingcheesehead

    flyingcheesehead Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    23,324
    Location:
    UQACY, WI
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    iMooniac
    To be fair - Most of those are pretty bland when you compare them with good Mexican, Indian, Thai, etc...

    Now, cajun food is definitely an exception. That's a regional specialty of "American" though.
     
  29. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    16,111
    Location:
    kojc, kixd, k34
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matthew
    Bland - coming from a guy that lives in a place that puts cheese on everything!

    BBQ, chili, Cajun (all have been mentioned already) are not bland unless you do it wrong. Sure, they are all regional, but "bland" is more than just heat. Meatloaf can be bland, or really savory. Steamed mussels in wine with lots of butter, garlic, and shallots, all sopped up with a good crusty bread slathered with butter is one of life's simple pleasures and it doesn't have any capsaicin.

    One of the great things about American food is that it is regional - it's always different wherever you go, and some places just do it better than others.
     
    SoonerAviator likes this.
  30. wilkersk

    wilkersk Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    May 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,626
    Location:
    Puget Sound
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    KennyW
    You need to find a better cook!
     
  31. camel

    camel Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Messages:
    112
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Camel
    Interesting.. I'm from Texas but have lived in Argentina most of the last 6 years. I got my private pilot license there and have flown quite a bit there (I already had my US PPL). I've made a bunch of good friends through flying GA there. I'm curious what city your friend lives in? If he's interested in meeting another expat, PM me and I'll send my contact info... always good to meet new pilots there. Here's some Patagonia flying:
     
    FORANE likes this.
  32. Pim de Kast

    Pim de Kast Filing Flight Plan

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Flighttracking
    Im retired in south of France, can recommend it! ;)
     
  33. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    Messages:
    5,216
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    SoonerAviator
    If you emigrate to France, do they issue you a white flag upon arrival? ;)
     
  34. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    Messages:
    5,216
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    SoonerAviator
    Yeah, I dunno where any of those items is necessarily bland. I've had bland hamburgers, catfish, pizza, and chicken; however I've also had extremely flavorful versions of those "American" staples as well. All depends on the spices and cooking style.
     
  35. Velocity173

    Velocity173 Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    11,718
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Velocity173
    I’d like to know the percentage of those that moved outside the US and then returned because it didn’t workout. A lot of people make retirement decisions based on a vacation spot. It’s based on passion vs logic. I’ve lived around the world and while some areas are great to visit, they still don’t have everything that the US has. The novelty, the lure of the unfamiliar will soon turn into longing for family and the familiar.

    I always say, anything you can get there, you can get here and more. Whatever money is saved in one area overseas, is made up for in increased costs elsewhere. Plus, I’m not “Guatemalan.” I’d be an outsider and always would be.
     
  36. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    16,111
    Location:
    kojc, kixd, k34
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matthew
    You don't have to really look very far. Around here, it's popular to think/dream about, "I'd love to have some land and raise chickens." (or something similar). After a couple years of being a gentleman farmer, reality sets in and the hours of work to maintain or keep the property, equipment, and livestock in proper condition becomes a real burden. It's one thing if you grew up in that environment, but it's not something that comes easily if you haven't.
     
    Velocity173 likes this.
  37. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    26,130
    Location:
    Paola, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    #bandozer
    I've also seen where the moving back depends on family and health conditions. I've seen a number of people move down for something on the 5-15 year range, and then at some point their health deteriorates and they want to spend their final days near their family (and in some cases can't live on their own anymore and so it becomes somewhat necessary).

    The friends of mine who moved down as ex-pats and have been there for a long time (without much for family) I think are likely to stay there until health issues potentially force them back to their native lands.

    Where I grew up:

    upload_2020-3-3_12-32-14.png

    Where I live now:

    upload_2020-3-3_12-33-42.png

    Hasn't gotten old yet. But I'm not exactly normal. :)
     
  38. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    16,111
    Location:
    kojc, kixd, k34
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matthew
    I was thinking of you - you've lasted much longer than most!
     
    Ted DuPuis likes this.
  39. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    16,111
    Location:
    kojc, kixd, k34
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matthew
    When my wife and I visited NYC a long time ago I commented that I could see how people would love that city life. I figured I'd be able to take it for a little while, maybe a year or so, and then I'd have to get out. I don't know that I could get used to it. Sure, I could force my way though it, but eventually I think I'd have to get out.
     
    kyleb likes this.
  40. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    26,130
    Location:
    Paola, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    #bandozer
    Almost 5 years in, and no regrets, at least not for me. Laurie does wish we were closer to town a lot of times, but the reality of the impact for us isn't bad. When we lived in a neighborhood in Ohio (because she felt our PA house was too far away from everything) we found it took just as long to get to the places we needed to go.

    In another 15 years or so when we're empty nesters and our kids are out of college, I could see us reevaluating things. But we're a long ways off from that.

    Honestly, the most annoying part is the lack of being able to order a pizza and have it delivered. But we've gotten used to it.

    The biggest advantage to it that I see is once you hit the geriatric stage. My mom is unable to drive and here in the KC area, she'd need to be in some kind of assisted living facility or living with us. Living in the aforementioned "Ted's Crib" she's basically able to live the same life that she's always lived. The grocery store is a few blocks away and she doesn't need much food for just her (plus there's lots of delivery/takeout).

    Assuming I degrade like she has (which hopefully I won't, or at least not in my mid 70s like she did), I could see the benefits of moving back there. Especially if my friends are still there.