Keep Instructing or Go Fly Lear35?

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by rt4388, May 28, 2018.

  1. rt4388

    rt4388 Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Messages:
    169
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    rt4388
    So I hit 500 hours today and a friend who's a captain in a Lear 35 said I most likely have a SIC job if I wanted it. Curious what you all think the pros and cons are... I enjoy instructing and ultimately my goal is to go to the airlines, but I would like to do some corporate flying at some point in my career. Biggest downsides as of now are longer to get to the airlines and I'll be missing out on some valuable instructing experience.
    Thoughts??
     
  2. 3393RP

    3393RP Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,768
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    3393RP
    Instructing experience doesn't count at the airlines but turbine multi time does.
     
  3. rt4388

    rt4388 Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Messages:
    169
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    rt4388
    Agreed. I am slightly worried though cause I would sign a contract for a couple of years at least, whereas, I could be at the airlines next year if I just instructed. Think if I took a PIC job in the Lear, I would be able to apply to a major in about the same timeframe as if I went to a regional?
     
  4. MD11Pilot

    MD11Pilot Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    Messages:
    511
    Location:
    Round Rock TX
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    MD11Pilot
    Job is for a SIC and then the last post talks about PIC? Sign a CONTRACT? Never. I know they want to ensure they get their money's worth out of you but in today's market you would be locking yourself in. How much flying do they do in the Lear? Is it part 135? They know you will go to a regional as soon as you meet the requirements and you will reach those requirements in the right seat of a Lear or a trainer. The question is "How soon one way vs another"?
    Not to be a wet blanket, but Lear, Citation, King Air jobs in the right seat are a dime a dozen in the present market. HOURS first. I just retired and have already had a chance to fly right seat in a Citation just jerking gear and talking on the radio...the "Captain" said that they pay 200-300 per day plus expenses?????? I politely told him that he was about 50% low and he said "I can get a flight instructor for that!" And I said, "Go ahead and hire them then". That's the market.

    You can apply to any airline anytime. The question is are you competitive. The company I just retired from is having very little problem hiring with upwards of 7000 hours TT with HEAVY INTERNATIONAL PIC Experience. The time that HR looks at someone with just 1500 hours is just long enough to file it in the trash can.
     
  5. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2013
    Messages:
    8,587
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jordan
    Just finish off Flight instructing. The regionals are hiring like crazy. Get there ASAP.
     
  6. frfly172

    frfly172 Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2008
    Messages:
    12,642
    Location:
    mass fla
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    ron keating
    How steady is the Lear time,as opposed to instructing. You might be able to do both.
     
  7. FlyingTiger

    FlyingTiger Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2014
    Messages:
    330
    Location:
    Lehman, PA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    FlyingTiger
    Surprised you can get a SIC in a Lear at minimum hours. I know there's a pilot shortage but that is a bit surprising to me.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
  8. PaulS

    PaulS Final Approach

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    7,317
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    PaulS
    Do both.
     
    James331 and AndrewX like this.
  9. Unit74

    Unit74 En-Route

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    4,629
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Unit74
    I'd say you are very much so in the drivers seat right now. With no shortage of jobs, do what positions you best for your over arching goals. If you want big iron, keep on keeping on. If you are more corporate inclined, I'd think the Lear time would have significant value in short order.

    But, I'm no commercial pilot, just looking at it logically w/o true industry knowledge.
     
  10. James331

    James331 Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Messages:
    17,554
    Location:
    Behind you!
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    James331
    Lol, care to elaborate?


    To the OP, I'd go find a VFR 135 gig and get some real experience, don't underestimate PIC time, no one every said they wish they had less command time and more SIC time.

    Sounds like you got the hours to land a 135 VFR job, and the season is just starting for that type of flying, go live it up, you got a fun journey ahead of you if you let it be, go check out AK, or go to Africa, or just call around the VFR charter places, or if you want to instruct go try to get in with FSI.

    Being a seat warmer in a lear, unless they are paying you a ungodly large amount of money for some reason, seems like one of the last things I'd recommend.

    As far as sidestepping a regional, which I think is a currently VERY good idea, not sure just PICing a Lear would do it, you probably want to hit ATP mins then get a job fly a Boeing for one of those iffy cargo opsthink Calitta or atlas or something, and make Capt, and put your app in to fill in the blank major.

    So yeah, of it were me, I'd go do a season or so in AK or Africa and have a adventure, get on with a large aircraft cargo op, apply for major.


    People arnt lining up to SIC old learjets, I'm also guessing it's not a lifestyles of the rich and famous type QOL type job ;)
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
  11. Eric Gleason

    Eric Gleason Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2016
    Messages:
    485
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Eric Gleason
    A contract that locks you in to anything only works for the employer in a tight job market, not the employee. I gotta believe that multi-engine and turbine time will make you a more attractive candidate, but I'm just speculating based on other things I've read. It would be worth a few minutes of your time to write emails to a few chief pilots at outfits you'd want to fly for and ask them. My guess is that if you write to 3 people, you'll get 3 different answers, but you'll also start making contacts, and networking plays a bigger role in professional success than knowledge and skill.
     
  12. RalphInCA

    RalphInCA Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2014
    Messages:
    1,329
    Location:
    Glendora, CA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    RalphInCA
    Only continue instructing if you are the kind of instructor who is truly invested in his/her student’s success.

    We don’t need burned out instructors, and we don’t needl bored instructors who are just building time.
     
  13. James331

    James331 Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Messages:
    17,554
    Location:
    Behind you!
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    James331
    He only has 500hrs TOTAL TIME, if he's burned out/bored at 500tt he need to rethink aviation lol
     
  14. MD11Pilot

    MD11Pilot Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    Messages:
    511
    Location:
    Round Rock TX
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    MD11Pilot
    Addendum
    Go to job fairs and talk with recruiters and ask them
     
  15. kayoh190

    kayoh190 Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    2,316
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Kayoh@190
    Almost certainly not. Think about this - how much flying will you be doing in that Lear? Even a busy 91 gig is typically just a few hundred hours per year. Continuing to instruct and flying at a regional will be a much faster method to get your total time to competitive levels for a major. I see low time guys get distracted by the shiny jet all the time, and in every case they end up heading over to a regional after a few years anyway. If a major is your goal, you might as well skip the interim step (and a training contract - yikes!) and head to a regional that much sooner.

    That said, if you're a 'life is a journey, not a destination' kind of guy, the corporate gig might be a fun way to start on an alternative path to your goal. Or do like what James recommends. But it'll almost certainly take longer to get you to your major (especially a legacy, who don't give a lot of love to people not either already 121 or military), if that's the end game.