ELT inspections

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by 4RNB, Mar 20, 2021.

  1. 4RNB

    4RNB Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Are ELT inspections part of an annual inspection?
    Must the ELT inspection be specifically mentioned in log books?
     
  2. Bell206

    Bell206 En-Route

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    No. But it is a convenient time to perform and track the ELT inspection.
    Yes.
     
  3. WDD

    WDD Pattern Altitude

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    Needs to be tested every 12 months.
     
  4. 4RNB

    4RNB Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yeah, I get that.
    What I want to know is if it needs a specific mention in logs
     
  5. MauleSkinner

    MauleSkinner Final Approach

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    If an inspection is required, it must be logged.
     
  6. mondtster

    mondtster En-Route

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    If it is not mentioned in the logs you don’t know if the ELT check was really performed. So yes, it needs a specific mention as does all work performed on the airplane.

    As has already been mentioned, in most privately owned and operated aircraft the ELT check is done at annual time. It doesn’t have to be however, and may not be done at the same time if a battery replacement occurs halfway through the year or some other similar work is performed.
     
  7. Clip4

    Clip4 Final Approach

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    You will see an entry that says some like “inspected ELT in accordance with FAR 91.207(d)”
     
  8. Daleandee

    Daleandee Cleared for Takeoff

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    I was taught that testing is required and that the date of battery replacement is to be noted on the exterior of the unit. I log the ELT testing and the battery replacement date in my airframe logbook.
     
  9. Clip4

    Clip4 Final Approach

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    d) Each emergency locator transmitter required by paragraph (a) of this section must be inspected within 12 calendar months after the last inspection for -

    (1) Proper installation;

    (2) Battery corrosion;

    (3) Operation of the controls and crash sensor; and

    (4) The presence of a sufficient signal radiated from its antenna.

    That’s the inspection.

    Paragraph C is the batteries.
    (c) Batteries used in the emergency locator transmitters required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section must be replaced (or recharged, if the batteries are rechargeable) -

    (1) When the transmitter has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour; or

    (2) When 50 percent of their useful life (or, for rechargeable batteries, 50 percent of their useful life of charge) has expired, as established by the transmitter manufacturer under its approval.

    The new expiration date for replacing (or recharging) the battery must be legibly marked on the outside of the transmitter and entered in the aircraft maintenance record. Paragraph (c)(2) of this section does not apply to batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during probable storage intervals.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2021
  10. Daleandee

    Daleandee Cleared for Takeoff

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    Exactly ...
     
  11. Let'sgoflying!

    Let'sgoflying! Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    I have always wondered how 406 elts are tested; can no longer listen on our comm radios.

    I found this which talks about a test set. (it's an install AC so perhaps not completely applicable to the 12 mo test FAR)


    AC91-44A
    406 MHz Testing.
    Verify the device is outputting a signal of not less than 17dBm (50mW) and not greater than 26dBm (400mW).
    Verify the device is transmitting on the correct frequency. This can be done by running the ELT self-test and detecting the signal with an ELT test set. Receiving and decoding a test message is an indication the unit is transmitting on a correct frequency.
    Using appropriate test equipment and shielding, note the ELT code transmitted and verify that the ELT code is registered with Cospas-Sarsat. The testing technician or aircraft owner should verify the information on file with Cospas-Sarsat is accurate and up to date.
    Determine that the ELT aural indicator can be heard in the cockpit with the aircraft engine(s) off, and that the visual indicator can be seen from the crew’s normal sitting position. If possible, this should be performed in a way that will prevent a SAR response (e.g., with a dummy load installed).
    Perform an operational check of the g switch. This should be performed in a way that will prevent a SAR response (e.g., with a dummy load installed). Replace if the g switch fails to activate.
    Ensure all cables except the 406 MHz transmitter output are reconnected. Ensure the 406 MHz transmitter is connected to a test set if possible. Activate the ELT (use the remote switch if installed), and determine if the system is radiating a strong 406 MHz signal. Ensure the system is reset if necessary.
    If equipped with a water-activated circuit, connect the ELT to a test set if possible. Activate the ELT by shorting the water-sensing leads and determine if the system is radiating a strong 406 MHz signal. Ensure the system is reset if necessary.
     
  12. mondtster

    mondtster En-Route

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    Every 406 I’ve seen also transmits on 121.5.
     
  13. asicer

    asicer Final Approach

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    There's also this:
    https://www.sarsat.noaa.gov/Beacon Testing Policy.html
     
    Let'sgoflying! likes this.
  14. Let'sgoflying!

    Let'sgoflying! Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    Except for the one which has a busted component on the 406 side.
    Then you hear 121.5 on the comm, thinking all is well - but it is not transmitting on 406.
     
  15. mondtster

    mondtster En-Route

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    I never suggested that was a substitute for testing. You wrote that you couldn't listen on a com radio so I wasn't sure if you knew that they do indeed transmit on 121.5 or not.