DuPuis Family Cobra Build

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by Ted DuPuis, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Thanks for all this detail - I'm learning a whole lot more about ignition systems than I ever thought.
     
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  2. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    I guess I missed it, but why did you choose the 289-firing order over the 351w firing order?
     
  3. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    I didn't explicitly choose the 289 firing order vs. the 351W firing order. However in looking at camshafts, I was looking at lift, duration, and lobe separation angle. From my research there's not a real benefit to the 289 vs. the 351W firing order, it's just that they're different. Supposedly the 351W order has some benefits as far as torque balancing on the crankshaft, but I'm not sure I see it.

    One thing that I'm curious about, as I am becoming more and more a student of engine dynamics and acoustics, is what (if any) sound difference would exist between the two firing orders.
     
  4. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Here's another interesting development.

    Summit Racing apparently checks YouTube for videos including reviews of their products, and found my video where I talked about their fuel hose and that I wasn't entirely pleased with it. They commented and eMailed me, noting two things:

    1) I bought the wrong fittings for use with that hose, which could lead to a fire. They also admitted their website was not clear on this and they would fix it so that it was clear and prevent this mistake from happening to others. They would gladly set up an exchange so I could get the right hose ends.

    2) I was welcome to return the hose for a full refund if I wanted.

    So, now I'm trying to figure out what I want to do here. I've been thinking about the hoses some. These hoses do not feel very good quality to me still - too light weight. Then again I'm used to firesleeve hoses in aircraft with stainless steel ends. These ends are aluminum as well, and by the way so are my fuel rails and the fittings that came with the fuel rails. None of this would pass aircraft cert requirements, period. Now that's not to say that I should go out and look to make fire hazards, but perhaps holding my Cobra to aviation standard isn't reasonable. I do still feel that the Aeroquip hose I worked with before is better and I'm not entirely sure about this stuff. This could give me an opportunity to just change it all up or just get the right fittings and try again.
     
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  5. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Today was a really productive day on the Cobra. Another one of those days where the actual work done was only a couple of hours, but the progress felt was significant. I got the ignition coils mounted on their brackets and then mounted to the engine, as well as got the lower radiator hose cut and put on. Factory Five includes a 7 foot length of "universal" radiator hose and connectors, which I had to then cut to fit. The connectors I had to heat up to get over the radiator end and the water pump (especially the water pump as the outlet on it is quite large), but it all worked out. I also got the coolant temperature sensor installed in the intake manifold.

    Then came a lot of thinking. I started looking at the spark plugs and the ignition coils, and figured out what I wanted to do for my spark plug routing. What I came up with is very similar to what Ford came up with on the 4.6 with the same ignition. However, I still need some sort of custom wires since the 4.6's spark plugs are buried deep within holes and are also located on the inside of the vee instead of the outside.

    I want to make my own spark plug wires, but the more I look at it the more I think I'm probably best off just letting a company with the proper tools on hand do it. Getting a good set of tools won't be cheap, a bad set of tools won't be good, and the ends won't be easy. But at least I now know the order I want, so I can start measuring. I also figured out how I want to route the wires (I think) so that's progress.

    Looking at things, I have a few ideas for where to mount the ignition module, but I'm not entirely sure yet and this may require removal of one of the ignition coils. I want to keep it accessible yet not hugely visible, and of course everything has to stay maintainable.

    I'm also thinking about whether I want to run an intake air temperature sensor, and if so, how do I want to run it. There's not really a good way to do it. There's no centralized point for airflow to go past, at least not within the engine. I could run a general sensor just sticking out somewhere under the hood and consider it close enough, which it probably would be. But I'm also thinking that I might just "cap and stow" the wires, go without an IAT sensor, and then mess with adding one later if I feel like it. But, I do need to get the throttle position sensor ordered because I think that might determine some of my other routing.

    I looked at the distributor hole some more and played around with an old 302 distributor I had laying around. Note that the 351 uses a 3/8" driveshaft off the distributor for the oil pump vs. 5/16" for the 302, so the dizzy by itself wouldn't fit in. But the more I looked at it the more I found myself thinking that the solution needs to be something very low profile that doesn't stick above (at least not far above) the top of the intake manifold. A friend of mine with a lathe offered to do the distributor modifications for me, but first we need to make a plan on what the changes should look like.

    The HVAC should be on the way next week, and then hopefully arrived.

    Really, I need to keep on ordering a bunch of little things so that the routing for what I need to do will become obvious. The alternator is another item that needs to get ordered and needs to go on soon. I'm starting to look around at this and trying to figure out what I want here. I definitely want a self-exciting alternator, and given the electrical nature of the car, there needs to be good power. The big draws to look at will be the HVAC (especially the electric compressor), electric water pump, electric cooling fan, and of course EFI/fuel pump. I want to keep something that's self-exciting so as to keep wiring to a minimum. I've generally done the old style GM alternators and those have worked fine. One of the newer AD230/244 style alternators would be make for a cleaner look under the hood, and especially the AD230 would be nice. But I think that my amperage needs might be a bit of a challenge out of that. I need to research some more and see what will make the most sense here.

    The suspension and brakes were the first two systems to be fully complete. At this point I've got a lot of systems that are close to completion and it'll come together quickly - cooling, fuel, ignition, HVAC, and of course then I have to start on electrical. Which I'm not doing until I have the others done.

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    After doing some thinking and some digging, I ended up deciding to go with an alternator: Powermaster 577711. This is a Ford 3G style alternator (which should bolt right up easily), comes in black (which fits the car's coloring and looks cooler than the standard "natural aluminum"), and is rated for 130 amps at idle and 200 amps total capacity. This is exactly what I need in this car to make sure that I can run all of the high current electrical goodies at idle. I found an eBay store that sold it for a good bit cheaper than others (as is often the case), so hopefully it lives up.

    Now I need to order some more stuff from Summit, probably tomorrow if I want to have it in time to make progress on the car when Laurie's on shift...
     
  7. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Today I called up Summit Racing and arranged for the exchange of fittings from the ones that I have (which were incorrect) the ones I need, and while I was at it ordered some additional items that I need to keep moving forward on things. Unfortunately the 90 degree fittings I won't have for this weekend, but I'll have enough to keep going.

    I ended up deciding to stick with the PTFE hose. I'm not sure at this point whether I think that's the best call or not, but from doing some more research it did seem like it was probably better suited for the underhood environment than rubber. More resistant to higher temperatures and pressures. Not the quality of an aviation firesleeve hose, but there's a significant price difference. So we'll see how that goes.

    I also got the filler neck and radiator cap, as well as coolant hose adapters required for finishing up the radiator connections. I won't be able to fully seal up the cooling system until the HVAC stuff arrives and is installed, but that'll be one system more or less checked off.

    The fuel system will be 95% done once I get these fittings. Really, I could do a pressure test and set the regulator correctly - I have enough hoses for that.

    One thing I'm thinking about still is whether I want to go for a new filler neck or repaint/reuse the one I have. It's got external rust on it and I can't really tell easily if there's internal rust, too. I'm leaning towards just buying a new one, but need to look at it some more. The reality is it's a part that nobody will see and so long as it's not going to throw rust into the fuel tank, I could just coat it with some spray paint and be fine.
     
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  8. Sac Arrow

    Sac Arrow Touchdown! Greaser!

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    #prayfornoleaksonstartup
     
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  9. MIFlyer

    MIFlyer Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    i'm just here to congratulate you on your use on international red
     
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  10. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    One of the things I’ve beeb thinking about is how I want to address testing the various systems for leaks. The fuel system is easy and straightforward (other than no convenient blue staining... what’s up with that?).

    The coolant I’m worries about the head to intake leaking. So my thought is that I’ll fill the cooling system a couple days before putting oil in and make sure I don’t see anything draining into the oil pan, and then put oil in it. Probably should also pressure test the cooling system. The intake coming off will really suck if I have to do that.

    I’ll admit I have concerns about the oil pan leaking but that’s really not too awful to take off if need be.

    Red is our accent color on the car and I’m really happy with it. About 30 pages ago I’d talked about wanting to paint the frame red instead of doing the powder coating. I think if I could do it over I’d probably do that.
     
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  11. Sac Arrow

    Sac Arrow Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I had an S10 Blazer with the 2.8L V6 which decided to blow out its intake manifold gasket at around 70K at a really bad time and place. It really put me out. It was two weeks and a new (rebuilt) engine later I was back on the road.
     
  12. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Yeah, this is a similar design where the intake manifold gaskets failing will have the same end result. So, having them not fail is important.
     
  13. Sac Arrow

    Sac Arrow Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Yeah we don't want to read a "Thinking about repairing a hole in the corner of my garage roof" thread.
     
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  14. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Lol, I've been meaning to replace my gas water heater (going on 17 years old I believe) which is actually located in the HVAC closet in the living room. Going to get a bit drafty if it blows up! Been planning on it for a year now, but some other project always comes up.
     
  15. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Got a few boxes in the mail yesterday - one box from Summit with the bits that I ordered including the coolant in-line filler neck and the (correct) fittings for my fuel hoses. Haven't messed with those much yet but at this point I have what I need to finish up the main cooling system (the HVAC not quite) and once a few more fittings arrive that were backordered, I can finish up the fuel system and test it. That won't be this weekend, but I can get most of the way there.

    The other big thing that I ordered and received was the HVAC system for the Cobra. This is a pretty complete kit. One of the Cobra specialty sellers takes a kit from another company (I forget which) and then adds in their aluminum pieces for attaching it behind the firewall. I already had those pieces and riveted them on, so now I have the rest of it.

    The first thing I noticed looking at it is that I'm going to have to cut another support member. Factory Five has a 1" square tube going up from the main cross support behind the dashboard to the hoop that is where the dashboard and aft of the hood area sits. That tube is directly in front of where the HVAC's "bird box" will go. This means I can't get it in. This is better to handle now, but I'll have to cut this square tube and figure out where to put it back in, or if I want to put it back in. Factory Five over the years has added extra metal bracing to strengthen the overall car. I figure these are good things and I should try to keep them.

    At some point before too long I am going to have to get an argon bottle to set myself up for MiG welding. My welder is flux core and while that works fine for farm stuff and situations where I don't care so much about the overall quality of the weld (and especially appearance. But for the Cobra, this matters more. I've been needing to do this for a while anyway, and I think I'm now at the point where I have enough motivation to do it. I just have to look into what that entails.

    So, time to get the angle grinder out...

    The alternator is also supposed to arrive today.
     
  16. -KLB-

    -KLB- Pre-takeoff checklist

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    You will want C25 mix for steel. (25% CO2, 75% argon) Straight argon is for aluminum and other more reactive metals. On steel, straight argon tends to leave a taller bead. I would rather run straight CO2 on steel than straight argon, but for most welders, the C25 mix gives the best results.
     
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  17. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Appreciate that. There's a welding shop nearby that I think could help out. There's also Craigslist, of course, but it doesn't seem like there's much to savings on welding stuff.
     
  18. FormerHangie

    FormerHangie En-Route

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    I bought one at Northern Tool. You buy it full and can exchange it for another full one once you empty it, if you empty it. I never did enough welding to need a refill, and ultimately gave the whole setup to my nephew.
     
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  19. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Good info, thanks. I'll look into that.
     
  20. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Few more packages showed up today.

    For one, my PowerMaster alternator. It'll fit perfectly, and according to the data tag produced 149 amps at idle. That'll work just fine. I did a quick holding it up to the engine and figured out how long of a bolt I'm going to need (unless I can find one in my stash of appropriate size). Since it's set up as a one wire then I will just need... you guessed it... one wire.

    Also got my connectors that I ordered for the EDIS. They're aftermarket but seem to fit correctly. Unfortunately after looking at the crank sensor some more, I determined that I, in fact, got the wrote one. I'll have to return that one and get a different one. Amazon Prime free returns are a good thing.
     
  21. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    This weekend I managed to get a bit done, although it felt like one of those weekends where I didn't get that much done. There weren't any systems that got fully buttoned up, and I wasn't even able to install as many of the items as I would have liked to. Mostly I lacked the hardware that I needed. I couldn't put the alternator on because I didn't have a bolt long enough, couldn't put the engine ground strap on because I didn't have a bolt short enough (two bolts, really), and the air conditioning I could only really start looking at. But I did do that, and so I think I've got a plan together for how I want to route the hoses for both the AC and the heat. The heat is going to require drilling some new holes in the box, getting some 90 degree hose bends, and then some straight sections. I'm trying to figure out the bets way to handle that. Obviously there's no hose that will be a direct fit for the full section I'm trying to cover. There are universal coolant bends, but most of them are expensive silicone, so I'll probably have to spend some time at the auto parts store just looking for some hose that might have what I'm looking for. But I know the routing that I want (I think), so that's progress.

    The AC hoses I have figured out, at least mostly. The high pressure line coming from the condenser will go along the passenger side top frame rail, the receiver/dryer will be mounted to a frame point as well, straight to the "bird box" (as we used to call them) with the AC unit. The hoses going to and from the rear of the car (where the compressor is going to be located) will go along the transmission tunnel, above the transmission. Be an easy spot to route them, out of the way of other things. The kit includes the fittings, but of course not for the compressor since I'm using a different one, so I'll need to order that before long and start getting that figured out. I'll take care of the heater hoses first.

    I got the upper radiator hose on, but I'm not really happy with it. Apparently I didn't search very well because in searching for thermostat housings, they all were 90 degrees off of the engine, pointed up. This would work fine if I had a 90 degree rubber/silicone hose, but with the universal metal tubing that Factory Five provides it ends up sticking the filler neck further up than I would like. I think (but am not certain) it should clear the hood as it sits, but I think I'm going to look for a better solution. Sometimes, these things take a few tries to get right.

    One example of this was another thing I did this weekend. I had previously riveted the adel clamps for the fuel filter to the frame. I didn't like this solution, figuring that eventually that would come to bite me. The frame is thick enough that it can be drilled and tapped, so that's exactly what I did. Now there are a couple of little allen head screws holding the clamps on and the filter housing itself should actually be removable.

    Wanting to make some more progress on a few little things to throw boxes away, I assembled the steering wheel (you have to bolt it to the hub) and then lightly tapped it onto the steering shaft. This was something that I figured would make moving the car around a lot easier. Similarly, I put the shift lever on the transmission. Now I can more easily shove it into a gear to keep the car from rolling. Of course, they will have to get removed again (and since the Factory Five shift lever is at about a 45 degree angle I'll have to drill another hole to get it at the right angle), but they make the car look more like a car and add a bit to functionality at the moment.

    The last thing of note that I did was putting the seat heaters in. This, of course, wasn't required to do now, but since I had them it let me get that task done, and also look at the seats further. Easy enough to do and easy to get the seat covers off the foam to get on. These really do feel like high quality seats, and are made in England, replicating the originals.

    One thing that we do want to do to the seats is make the stitching red. Currently it's black, Laurie and I think red would look really sharp, especially given that red is the accent color on the car. Doing some reading up, it looks like a lot of people have had good success using fabric markers to stain stitching. This stitching is as simple as it comes, so I'll probably do some more research, figure out what looks like a good one to go with, and then try on an area that would be hidden if it doesn't work out.

    I'm still not quite ready for an electrical system yet, but it's getting close. Last summer when I was really making progress I'd hoped to be able to go-kart the car for my son's first day of school. Obviously that didn't happen (nor did driving it to Ford v. Ferrari). It probably won't be driving by the beginning of spring, either, given the amount of little details that need to get finished up between now and then. However, driving it to pick up my son from his last day of school (mid/late May) and then be able to drive it through the summer definitely seems like a reasonable and attainable goal. To get there is just going to require a lot of little trips to the parts store at this point.
     
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  22. ktup-flyer

    ktup-flyer En-Route

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  23. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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  24. Sac Arrow

    Sac Arrow Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Pitchers. We want pitchers.
     
  25. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    I was bad about pictures this weekend. Took a decent bit of video actually, but I didn't feel like much of it was very good I'll have to see what of it I might want to post.
     
  26. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    The encouraging thing about my current stage with the Cobra is that I'm at a phase of lots of little details. This, however, means trips to the hardware store more or less every day to make some level of progress, and I'm sure I'll get held up in the project at some point because of it. But what that also means is that if I can spend a few minutes in the garage at night, I can make some form of progress.

    So after going to Tractor Supply to buy my bag of bolts, I promptly realized that someone put a 6" bolt in the 5" box, so while I meant to get a 5" and a 6" bolt, I got two 6" bolts. The significance of this is that I couldn't bolt the alternator to the engine fully, but I was able to figure out how many washers I needed to space it so as to get the alternator pulley lined up with the crank pulley. That part is exciting. I also procured the right size bolt for the steering wheel to steering shaft (which I put on, but just hand tightened) and got a bolt for the engine ground.

    With the alternator in place, I also can now see what sort of welding I'll need to do to make some sort of tensioner bracket, and might get the metal for it while shopping. And I was able to measure to figure out how long of a belt I'll need for the alternator belt.

    While looking at the engine, I also figured out something that I had suspected, which was that the cooling hose is almost certainly going to be sticking up too high to clear the hood. I had originally bought a thermostat housing with a 90 degree outlet (pointing straight up). I didn't like that, but couldn't really find anything pointing forward. Doing some searching now I've found a few out there that I think will work and get the angle where it should be - clearing the hood. This also makes me think the velocity stacks may not clear (which was something I knew was a risk). However that's less of a concern to me as I know the throttle bodies will clear. And I think they will ultimately be fine since Ill be putting the hood scoop on my Cobra.

    I also spent some time trying to figure out sensors. The crankshaft position sensor I ordered turned out to be the wrong one, and although this is a timing cover that can fit a 302 or a 351, the 302 Explorer crank sensor won't fit. So after looking on Rock Auto for a while I found another sensor (ironically for a Ford Contour) that looks like it might be it. So I'll get one of those coming and try it out.

    The other thing I'm trying to figure out is the throttle position sensor. I knew it used a mid-90s GM sensor, and there are two it could be from what I can tell:

    AC Delco 213-894 or 213-895

    The difference is one is clockwise and one is counter-clockwise. The thing is, I can't find anything telling me which one is which. As I look at where the TPS bolts up, the shaft rotates counter-clockwise as the throttle bodies open. Which means that if plugged into the sensor, they would rotate clockwise. Great... well that's not helpful. I'll probably just have to get both and return one.

    So now I have a shopping list for a bunch more metal and parts, some at the store, and some Amazon.

    One thing I'm also thinking about is the MegaSquirt and using it for certain controls. Specifically, the cooling fan and to some extent (maybe) the water pump. The MegaSquirt has multiple programmable outputs that can drive relays, LED indicators, etc. I will definitely use one for the cooling fan. However part of me also wonders if I shouldn't put a ballast resistor in-line with the electric water pump (55 GPM is a lot more than needed most of the time) that I could then kick up if temperature got warmer. I have to think about that and I don't know if I'm going to have excess cooling or not, especially on the track. I may leave it for now and look at adding in a kick down resistor later, or at least think about it some after I put some miles on it in go-kart mode.

    Quite exciting that before long I will be at a point where the electrical system really is the next thing to do.
     
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  27. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Today I went to the auto parts store while on my lunch break to see if I could find a serpentine belt for the Cobra. I did my measurements to figure out what size I needed to get the alternator in the right location, but since it's a small 6-rib belt, I questioned whether or not I'd be able to find it. Sure enough, though, I found a couple in the right size range. So I'll put those on, see how they fit, and then pick the one that fits better. Then I can make a note of that in my specs so that I know what part to get in the future.

    I really, really like having the single short 6-rib belt on the front of the engine. Really, the aesthetics on this car under hood are dead on. I've not typically been much of an underhood beauty kind of person, but in this case, I do care more about it.
     
  28. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    Another thing I've forgotten to talk about was coolant. There's standard green coolant, Dexcool, or something more exotic like Evanscool. Jay Leno uses the Evans coolant in his cars, and has talked about the fact that it's waterless so it doesn't expand, system therefore runs very low pressure, no water so you don't have internal corrosion/rust issues. There are some seemingly reasonable advantages to it.

    Coolant is honestly something I've never spent much time thinking about because the cars I've worked on have always had something already in there that I've pretty much had to put in to stick with what the thing has in it already. But this time, I'm starting from new, and get to decide.

    Most people I think stick with the green stuff just because it's simple and cheap. It's also universally available. OEMs have mostly switched over to some sort of DexCool/orange coolant, which is apparently because there are adavntages ot it vs. the green stuff. The Evanscool stuff looks interesting, but you can't mix it with anything else and it's $45/gallon on a system that will probably take 3-4 gallons. If a hose pops off, that suddenly gets really expensive.

    So, something new to think about. If anyone has thoughts, I'm all ears.
     
  29. Bill Jennings

    Bill Jennings Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    I'd stick with tried and true prestone green stuff and dump it every 2-3 years.
     
  30. MIFlyer

    MIFlyer Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    Either that or CAT ELC with distilled water (or buy the 50/50). for the kind of car you have though, the evans coolant would be tempting
     
  31. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    I see a lot of advantages given its intended use. Lots of sitting, but also intended racing. Low pressure in the cooling system I think is a good thing and would overall help with longevity (remember this is overall an old system design). And life of the car coolant, for something I intend on keeping a long time... yeah, tempting.

    The Cat ELC would be another interesting option. Hadn't thought about that but it is good stuff.

    The scary part is if a hose pops off on the race track or anywhere else (which granted is less likely with the Evanscool since lower pressure), I lose something like $120-$160 worth of coolant.

    The reality is I've never been good about changing coolant out unless there's an issue that's popped up. I know, bad Ted. I'm good at changing oils and stuff but never coolant. And to be fair, I've had very few cooling system issues over the years. I also have typically not kept cars for very long.
     
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  32. SoonerAviator

    SoonerAviator Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Meh, standard coolant is fine in this application. Especially since there could be some surprises (something necessitating removal of coolant hoses) until the bugs are all sorted. Then, you could flush the system and put the Evanscool in once you're confident that everything is running as it should.
     
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  33. FormerHangie

    FormerHangie En-Route

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    If a hose pops off, the cost of the coolant is the least of your worries. Antifreeze is slippery stuff and can easily send you spinning off track. If you do a good job with your hoses, they won't come off.

    Is there some sort of overflow tank that catches any expanding coolant?
     
  34. Sac Arrow

    Sac Arrow Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Which is why in the motorcycle track world, they let you run water only. But dumping a bike and sending coolant all over the track is more common in motorcycle racing.
     
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  35. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    I’ve had that thought as well. Start as normal for the first year or so, and then consider flushing once all the kinks are worked out.

    The kit works however I set it up. So one thing I have to decide is whether or not I want to add a coolant tank. Currently there isn’t one but it would be easy enough to add.
     
  36. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    The new (45ish degree instead of 90 degree) thermostat housing showed up today, along with one of the throttle position sensors I ordered. Turns out first time's the charm, and now I know which is which. So when the other one arrives I'll just return it. The connector was the same for both of them.

    I did think briefly whether I wanted to mount the throttle position sensor on the front of the engine or the rear. The rear would make it need the other direction (counter clockwise) sensor. I decided the front is more maintainable and it won't detract any from the aesthetic, so I'll leave it there. But I do need to find the correct size bolts for it. I think they're metric. But I am going to have to remove the TPS mount anyway so I can flip it over (have the connector pointed down instead of up). So I'll just take it to Tractor Supply and figure out the right size bolts.
     
  37. 3393RP

    3393RP En-Route

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    Until this 1992 incident, Rick Mears had never done so much as brush the wall at Indy in his previous 15 years of participation there.

    A coolant hose blew off of the heat exchanger just before entering Turn 2. I believe he broke his right wrist.

    It was a hard hit.

     
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  38. FormerHangie

    FormerHangie En-Route

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    That was savage.
     
  39. flyingbrit

    flyingbrit Pre-takeoff checklist

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    One wire alternators are attractive to the aftermarket due to their simplicity and neat appearance. However they have a tendency to overcharge the battery when the load is low. This is because they operate by having a rotor/field with some residual magnetism. This allows the alternator to start up without having a battery feed to the field. However it also results in the regulator not having full control of the output, i.e. even when the field current is zero, the output is finite. Suggest you monitor the system voltage and/or charging current carefully.
     
  40. Ted DuPuis

    Ted DuPuis Administrator Management Council Member

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    I have a voltmeter going in the car, so I'll be able to. The alternator test card said it charged at 14.8 volts, so a bit on the high side. Certainly reasonable for my various electrical components. I've run one-wire alternators in the past and never had battery issues.

    That said, you make a valid point for me to consider with the battery, specifically that I might be better off looking at something like a deep cycle battery that will benefit from the higher voltage.