Do I Need to File a Report?

Penguinforce

Pre-takeoff checklist
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Penguinforce
On my flight today, I encountered total electric failure and therefore lost the ability to communicate with radios. Luckily I was already in talks with flight following and seconds before losing communications, I told them we would be diverting to a nearby delta airspace airport and we were guided down safely with the help of light signals from tower. Upon landing, flight following called us to verify we landed ok and I also called tower whilst taxiing for taxiing help and FBO directions. We are currently awaiting what went wrong and caused the failure. My question is, do I need to file any report to the FAA or NTSB? It’s not an accident nor is it engine related as the airplane still flew fine so I don’t believe I needed to file anything. Also I already talked with both tower and center and they didn’t mention anything about needing to file a report. I also never declared an emergency landing as it didn’t necessarily call for that, but I wanted to make sure, and I cannot find anywhere saying I need to file anything.
 
That’s what I was assuming as well. But they just wanted to make sure we landed ok and could taxi ok so not hearing anything about paperwork I assumed would mean nothing needing to be done from my end. Again, just wanted to double check. Thank you!
 
Nopeity nopeity nope!

Not an accident. Not an incident.
(Not even an emergency.)
Nice work using your last Joules of comms!
 
They would have told you if you needed to do something when you spoke with them.

I would not expect ATC to necessarily know the details of the reporting requirements in 49 CFR Part 830, which pertain to what things you need to report to the NTSB, not to ATC, and apply even if you're not talking to ATC. So I wouldn't take lack of ATC telling you to report something as confirmation that you DON'T need to report anything.

The answer to the OP's question is still "no", but it has nothing to do with whether ATC said they wanted a report or not.
 
If there were learning points for other pilots, filing a report could help someone else do well in a similar situation. ASRS reports aren’t solely for avoiding FAA sanctions; their purpose is to improve safety.
 
Don’t NEED to; but in view of the fact that it is anonymous (and therefore won’t open any unwanted interactions with the FAA], the fact it may be a learning experience for you in how the ASRS system works, and how easy it is to do, I would suggest maybe proceeding with an ASRS....but really up to you.
 
Don’t NEED to; but in view of the fact that it is anonymous (and therefore won’t open any unwanted interactions with the FAA], the fact it may be a learning experience for you in how the ASRS system works, and how easy it is to do, I would suggest maybe proceeding with an ASRS....but really up to you.


Sometimes referred to as the NASA form.

https://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/report/electronic.html
 
If there were learning points for other pilots, filing a report could help someone else do well in a similar situation. ASRS reports aren’t solely for avoiding FAA sanctions; their purpose is to improve safety.

Thank you, I was waiting for someone to recommend a ASRS. Every time someone comes on and says they busted airspace because they were not paying or attention or fumbling around with Foreflight everyone says file.

But this is a great legitimate reason to file one.
 
don't listen to shepard. the first purpose of the nasa form is for safety. they de-identify and log the information. many sectors of aviation use that data for research and safety studies. somebody may be compiling data on say, tower use of light gun signals and the ratio of proper vs improper response. your report may be a data point for that. a lot of pilots think the form should only be used when they think that a violation has happened. that's totally wrong, the get of jail free card was put in to try to get pilots to file forms. I file one any time that something out of the ordinary happens just to get the data point in the system. for example, some badly designed taxiway signage has been changed because of the number of reports given on certain airports.a pilots that says, " that didn't cause a problem or violation, but it was a bit confusing.." decided to file a nasa and somebody saw a few that referred to that same airport and said, "we might want to take a look at that". go ahead and file it. just state what happened, how you handled it and any suggestions if changes could be made to the system to help someone else in that situation.
 
I’m surprised this place hasn’t decided to dance on the head of a pin and say an electrical failure removes more than 50% of information from an electronic panel, thus all electrical failures in a TAA are a mandatory NTSB 830 report. LOL.
 
On my flight today, I encountered total electric failure and therefore lost the ability to communicate with radios. Luckily I was already in talks with flight following and seconds before losing communications, I told them we would be diverting to a nearby delta airspace airport and we were guided down safely with the help of light signals from tower. Upon landing, flight following called us to verify we landed ok and I also called tower whilst taxiing for taxiing help and FBO directions. We are currently awaiting what went wrong and caused the failure. My question is, do I need to file any report to the FAA or NTSB? It’s not an accident nor is it engine related as the airplane still flew fine so I don’t believe I needed to file anything. Also I already talked with both tower and center and they didn’t mention anything about needing to file a report. I also never declared an emergency landing as it didn’t necessarily call for that, but I wanted to make sure, and I cannot find anywhere saying I need to file anything.

Happened to me a few years ago. A bit different scenario because I heard "cleared to land" from the tower. When I clicked the PTT to respond I lost all electrical. Luckily the gear was already down.

The FSDO called a while later and asked for:
************
Please send copies of the records requested:
* Last years and current year aircraft annual inspection
* Last years and current engine 100 hr. inspection
* Current altimeter / transponder test/inspection. (14CFR 91.411, 91.413)
* Copy of Pilot certificate, medical, and bi-annual review (student log and instructor endorsements, as applicable)
* A logbook entry of the issue reported along with a certified mechanics signature approving or disapproving the aircraft for return to service.

Reference 14 CFR 91.405, and 91.407 if needed regarding aircraft records.
Questions regarding the logbook entry, reference 14 CFR 43.11.
*************

I didn't need to provide the 100hr inspection because my plane was not required to have 100hr inspections. I provided the information and that's the last I heard of anything.
 
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