CFI-I Checkride preparation: Partial Panel on a G3X equipped airplane

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by AggieMike88, Feb 10, 2021.

  1. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    The original "I don't know it all" of aviation.
    Soon I will be working on preparing for my CFI-I. And will be doing it in the club's Skylane once the comes back from the avionics shop. We are upgrading to a G3X-Touch, GTN 650Xi, GFC500, a G5 as the backup instrument, and some other goodies.

    I have already spoken with my examiner of choice and he provided information about how the examination will happen. For the flight portion, I will be asked to perform and one of the approaches "partial panel".

    When one has a vacuum system and round dials, being proficient at partial panel is a must to mitigate vacuum system failure. So no problem with the need to demo that during the flight exam.

    But with replacing the vac pump with microchips, how should I expect this part of the exam to happen?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2021
  2. Hang 4

    Hang 4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    Mine used the GTN HSI and the analog altimeter. Dive and drive. Edit..
    Re-read what you have, no G5?
     
  3. Salty

    Salty Final Approach

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    If it were me, I'd practice with different parts of the PFD covered up and different components turned off or covered up, all hand flying, of course. :)

    For my IR (I know this is different, just giving an example) he covered the HSI G5 once I was established on an RNAV approach, then just after the FAF he covered the AI G5. He left me with the GPS and my iPad to finish it up with.
     
  4. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    We will have a G5 as our back up instrument.

    I edited the original post to include this.
     
  5. mondtster

    mondtster En-Route

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    Why not inquire with the examiner who will administer the test? Different examiners have different thoughts on how to do this.

    In the real world, I suspect one of two things will happen. The whole screen will go dark or a sensor/box will fail and take out the portions of the system associated with it.
     
  6. Hang 4

    Hang 4 Cleared for Takeoff

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    We practiced PP by dimming the G500 screen. Used the back up AI, Altimeter and the GTN HSI to fly the approach. In the actual exam, the DPE had stickies to cover the AI in the G500. I actually found it a lot easier to fly PP, easier to focus your scan without the distracting data showing.
     
  7. midlifeflyer

    midlifeflyer Touchdown! Greaser!

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    This issue came up when the G1000 came along and led to the change in the name of the task from loss of gyro instruments (or some such) to loss of primary instruments. The G1000 standard for partial panel is to dim the PFD and have the pilot rely on the backup instruments (not use reversionary mode).

    I would expect the same in any glass PFD installation. Dim/disable(p/cover the primary and have the pilot fly the backups.

    BTW, I would also expect to be asked about systems failure modes. What gives the PFD its information, what would cause them and what effects they might have on other equipment, such as an autopilot.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
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  8. Ryan F.

    Ryan F. Cleared for Takeoff

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    For me, this subject always involves discussion during the ground portion. This includes system components such as AHARS/ADC and what would be presented to the pilot in the event of an LRU failure, as well as how the backup display or instruments work. To simulate the failure itself In flight, I tend to dim the PFD screen in accordance with the guidance in Appendix 7 of the Instrument Rating - Airplane ACS, which states that the "most realistic failure mode" is to be used. My expectation is that the applicant will then proactively utilize backup instrumentation. In G1000/NXi or Perspective systems this generally results in the applicant using reversionary mode on the MFD, aka "pushing the red button."

    One note worth mentioning from a practical test perspective is that task VII.D. is titled "Approach with Loss of Primary Flight Instrument Indicators" which essentially means whatever failure mode the evaluator selects must by default still allow the applicant to fly an approach. One configuration example: I provide checkrides in airplanes equipped with the NXi, with a standalone Aspen EFD as the backup. The Aspen isn't fed any nav inputs, it's purely a "six pack in a box" with no HSI, just a heading indicator. As such there's no way to evaluate the skill IR.VII.D.S2, "Complete a nonprecision instrument approach without the use of the primary flight instruments using the skill elements of the nonprecision approach Task" if the applicant is down to that backup instrumentation.

    As a sidebar... for now, at least (until the ACS is introduced) the CFI-IA PTS provides the evaluator with more latitude in testing the instructor applicant on what we've historically called "partial panel" flying. I take advantage of this to ensure CFI-IA applicants are truly capable of flying on backup instrumentation - usually a more involved failure than simply dimming a screen.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2021
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  9. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    The original "I don't know it all" of aviation.
    For the oral exam, pitot-static system (and instruments) as well as gyroscopic instruments are to be taught. I will add to my outline to talk about glass panel aspects of these in addition to the the steampunk versions.

    Thanks for pointing out the need to include microchips in my teaching notes
     
  10. Ryan F.

    Ryan F. Cleared for Takeoff

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    For some reason, when I replied I thought we were discussing an IRA rather than CFI-IA.

    To expand on my "sidebar" above, my CFI-IA applicants can expect to do some actual flying on the standby instruments. This could include turns, climbs, descents, headings, and combinations thereof based on a simulated failure scenario in which vectors are required to find VFR conditions. As I mentioned, the PTS grants evaluators this kind of flexibility, but the ACS is more restrictive.
     
  11. midlifeflyer

    midlifeflyer Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I mention it especially because you are flying one. Yes, the CFI PTS - not ACS - goes back to 2012, so it hasn't been updated and talks about the pitot static system. But I doubt an examiner will be satisfied with, "This airplane doesn't have one" as an answer :D. "Gee, I'm not familiar with the system in the airplane we are flying today. Teach me how it works" seems an obvious question to salsify Task III.C.

    To determine that the applicant exhibits instructional knowledge of the elements related to the operation of systems, as applicable to the airplane used for the practical test​
     
  12. RussR

    RussR Pattern Altitude

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    When I am teaching instruments (or conducting refresher training) and we get to the formerly "partial panel" stuff, it always requires much thought on my part. Since it's "loss of primary flight instruments", AND it is also supposed to consist of a realistic failure mode (see one of the IR ACS appendices), you are right to ask how this can best be accomplished. And the answer depends on each specific airplane you're in. I posted this in another recent thread (the one about Private Pilot checkrides being harder than in the past):

    At some point in training, I'll usually get to just failing everything I can, mostly as a fun and hopefully-confidence-building exercise that they can keep the plane upright and navigate even if everything really hits the fan. But it's in no way realistic. If you have a vacuum AI and an electric HSI, the chances of both of them failing at the same time is pretty infinitesimal. Look for the commonalities between systems to create realism.
     
  13. Clip4

    Clip4 Final Approach

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    Do the test in a Cirrus and just pull the chute.
     
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