Student in right seat with private pilot PIC-legal?

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Baxsie, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Even the worst ones I’ve seen compared to the average non CFI were better. They went through the training and a grueling oral and flight. Even if they sucked, they were able to fool a DPE or Fed. There are lots of CFIs that probably suck. There are lots of non CFIs that also probably suck. I think flying with a non CFI can be beneficial AFTER learning the basics.
     
  2. JonH

    JonH Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Lol, thread officially derailed. Sorry OP.
     
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  3. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Welcome to PoA. You new?;)
     
  4. Salty

    Salty Cleared for Takeoff

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    If you get that locked in and can't adjust then I'd say you shouldn't be a pilot. Just sayin. You have to adjust for weather, gross weight, the type of aircraft, a million other factors; a good pilot is always learning.


    Go fly right seat.
     
  5. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 En-Route

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    :( Damn....I thought I was a pretty good teacher. None of the controllers I've trained has ever killed anyone yet. (yet added because somebody was going to say it anyway.
     
  6. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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  7. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 En-Route

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    Target audience confirmed. ;)
     
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  8. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    I fly right seat all the time.
     
  9. abqtj

    abqtj Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Dead-on here.

    I'm 47 and at 65 hours. No way am I done with just 10 more hours, though. I'm thinking more like 20-25 or so. But, I've had times with 3+ weeks between lessons and I know that hurts me. Heck, I flew yesterday and won't fly again until January 13th due to being out of the country for the holidays.
     
  10. Stephen Shore

    Stephen Shore Pre-Flight

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    First of all, don't worry about the ground school at 53. All the online self study courses make it so much easier than in the past. I got my PPL at 17 (1980) flew for a few years and walked away until a few months ago. I got current again and immediately began working on my IR. I used King and Gold Method both. Passed the IR written no problem - and I am 54.

    What others said - get all the seat time you can whether loggable or not. If nothing else it will light the fire in you and motivate you to start your formal PPL training asap.

    If you find the right CFI you will be successful. The main thing is to ask around and find a CFI that comes highly recommended. I did and I found one that got me current quickly and is doing a very thorough job with the IR training.

    I think 53 is a great age to learn. I think back to when I got my PPL at 17 years old and I am just thankful that I am alive. 17 year olds may learn quickly, but they can be idiots behind the wheel of a plane or car. I think the term is "indestructible".

    The only advantage of being 17 is quite honestly the 3rd class medical is certainly not anything to worry about. I did kind of sweat that this past summer when I went back in to get it.

    My weight on my original PPL license is 175. Not even close today. BTW - does the FAA still use your SS# for your certificate number?
     
  11. Greg Bockelman

    Greg Bockelman Administrator Management Council Member

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    No SS number.
     
  12. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    This comment has me curious. Are you still flying on your paper certificate or a plastic one?
     
  13. Stephen Shore

    Stephen Shore Pre-Flight

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    Definitely not using original certificate. It is barely legible and very frayed. I sent the FAA $2 and I have a fancy plastic one now.
     
  14. Stan Cooper

    Stan Cooper Pre-takeoff checklist

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    There is a world of difference between then and now.

    In the early 1960s I soloed at 5.5 hours and took my PP check ride with 38 hours. The check ride took 2 hours, so when it was over I had the required 40 hours in my logbook. This was in central California near Vandenberg AFB and around Ogden, Utah near Hill AFB in 1963 and 1964.

    With today's much more complex airspace and regulatory environments there is no way I could obtain a private certificate with so few hours.
     
  15. Hippike

    Hippike Pre-Flight

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    40 hours is BS! I started PPL training at age 38. Logged over 80 hours and just got to the point where taking the CK is only weeks away (and I consider myself a very skilled person when it comes to operating heavy machinery;)

    I used Gleim's ground school home study and completed the first 2 or 3 units before any actual flying but at about the 4th unit I got to the point where I needed actual flying to implement all the stuff I learnt. I couldn't continue the home study until I could feel/see/touch the airplane so to have practical knowledge to link with the stuff I was required to memorize. But you may do better at doing the ground school only, but keep in mind if it feels like you can't study any more because it just doesn't stick, you need the aircraft and the flying!

    Good luck!
     
  16. SoCal RV Flyer

    SoCal RV Flyer Cleared for Takeoff

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    The airport you fly out of can affect the number of hours it takes to get your PPL. At John Wayne, where I trained, it was a full mile of taxiing from where the aircraft was parked to the approach end of the runway. So let's just say that I peaked in taxiing proficiency very early while building up those Hobbs hours!

    But no regrets. Learning at a busy Class C was a great introduction to clearance calls, avoiding wake turbulence, etc. Lots of interesting stuff going on in the pattern with helicopters below and 737s coming in on the adjacent runway. No two laps of the pattern were the same.
     
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  17. abqtj

    abqtj Pre-takeoff checklist

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    This is so very true. I’m very comfortable on the radio and when getting vectored around In the pattern ( or anywhere). It really does help but also runs up the time/cost.