Starting on my PPL

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by MHarrow, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. MHarrow

    MHarrow Filing Flight Plan

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    So I have done a local discovery flight out here in Colorado. I really like the instructor he is great and well informed.

    Unfortunately I am a overseas contractor. So I am home for 30 days and back to work for 90. Should I wait until the end of my contract late next year. Or just fly as much as I can while I am home and earn it that way?
     
  2. Rgbeard

    Rgbeard Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Congrats on picking up the disease we all share!!

    My advice is to wait.

    Learning to fly is as much a motor-skill development as well as an intellectual effort. If you wait for a time when the available funds and the available time both converge you will earn your license with the least expense.

    But that said, if you can’t wait to get in the air, go for it!

    In 30-days you can be post-solo and when you’re back you just backtrack a little and do your first cross country.

    It all depends on how you view the small backtrack and cost efficiency hit. If you don’t really care..... go have fun!
     
  3. SkyDog58

    SkyDog58 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Old dog w/o new tricks
    Go for it. Yes you’ll gain a little rust over the time you are away but at least you won’t be waiting an entire year to get started. If you work hard at it while you are here, you could possibly be able to get it knocked out in your second 30 day period but if not, your third.
     
  4. frfly172

    frfly172 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    If you enjoy the flying and can afford some extra expense,go for it . Good luck with your endeavors.
     
  5. Skyrys62

    Skyrys62 Pattern Altitude

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    If you don't have too many commitments at home, you can do a lot of flying in 30 days, weather depending. You could knock that PPL out quick if it's all in your favor... and save some money.
    You'll probably spend more if you spread it out over the months between work, but I agree that you can knock the rust off if that's what you choose. Plus you can annoy the people at work by constantly talking about it all. ;)

    Seriously, you could make a lot of progress in a month or two at home with no other commitments. If you solo one month and go back to work, you'll need to get re-soloed by your instructor, but that's very minimal...and you'd probably want a refresher ride anyway.

    For a good look at what can be accomplished while still working overseas see @Katamarino 's posts/adventures.

    Probably not the same situation as yours, (almost reversed time frames) but they still need to be looked at because they're so awesome.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
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  6. texasclouds

    texasclouds Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I'd say start it and go as far as you can. You probably can you study the ground school and prep for the written test while overseas. Get the Gleim FAA Written Test booklet.

    https://www.gleimaviation.com/shop/ppkt/
     
  7. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Now offering reverse discounts.
    I would advise doing what you can during your current "home" rotation. Then when overseas, work on the ground school items and prep for the written test.

    Just before returning home, reach out to the instructor, and schedule a very active and productive flying schedule, with the goal of completing before your next overseas departure.

    Upon return home, take the knowledge test, pass. Then link up with the instructor and get busy flying.
     
  8. benyflyguy

    benyflyguy Line Up and Wait

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    How amenable is Colorado to ppl training this time of year??
     
  9. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    @MHarrow .. In addition to the "Ford" version of the knowledge test info (Gleim), you also have the "Chevy" version from King Schools, the "Dodge" version from Sportys, the "Toyota" version from ASA2Fly.com, and the "Honda" version from Gold Seal Online. And there is Jeppesen, but I'm not sure what brand of car they would be. Maybe Yugo?

    And if a new pilot want the free versions, then this FAA Handbook Page is where to find those. (look for the Airplane Flying Handbook and Pilots Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge)

    My point being, there are multiple sources for the ground school information. And it's up to the student pilot to determine which one suits their learning style.
     
  10. Cici

    Cici Pre-Flight

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    Colorado has over 300 sunny days a year. Winds do pick up, but I have put down about 40 hours the last 30 days, and that is flying around a 9-5, about half with an instructor (one more schedule to juggle) and a family. The main concern would be the instructor. I would contact them and get on their schedule ASAP.

    Another data point is I started my ppl training mid oct and ended @ end of feb. Again, with a 9-5, a "part time" instructor and a family. If you have the money and no time, you could probably knock it out in 3-4 weeks. DPE availability is loosening up as well.
     
  11. Wesley Bryant

    Wesley Bryant Filing Flight Plan

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    I'd personally wait. I know that when I had a break in my training, I often forgot a few things here and there.
     
  12. sarangan

    sarangan Pre-takeoff checklist

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    It is true you will forget a few things, but it comes back quickly. My recommendation is to do it now. You will always have breaks in flying even after you earn your certificate. Flying is not just about learning the mechanics, but also developing the right mindset. You can do a lot while you are away, such as participate in discussion forums like this, and may be sign up for pilotworkshops, and may be do a bit of simming. (BTW, its not a PPL).