Ifr finisher course in their plane or stick with the club

Discussion in 'Cleared for the Approach' started by Monpilot, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. Monpilot

    Monpilot Pre-Flight

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    your input is appreciated.

    I took an american flyers weekend ifr written course and passed.

    Now im training for my oral and flight and its going slowly. Im in a club and one of the members is my cfii but its slow and im interested in trying a new instructor.

    The club olane will be the plane i fly after i get my ifr ticket.

    So does it make sense to knock out the training and mu checkride using the american flyers ifr finish up classes using the american flyers plane? I could use the club plane but american flyers would have to talk to the insurance comoany for the club and thats more hurdles.

    Or should i continue with my cfii and the club plane so that i learn in the plane ill eventually use?

    I learned my ppl in a 152 and transitioned to the club archer quickly but using the garmin for ifr is a different animal.
     
  2. Catalo

    Catalo Pre-takeoff checklist

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    American flyers is efficient and good training. So if you're just trying to get it done quick I'd say go with them. You can always use the club's cfii to transition to the club plane and learn its avionics.
     
  3. NKTFlyer

    NKTFlyer Pre-Flight

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    Just my two cents...I would use the club plane. I'm guessing AF does the insurance dance often for their finish-up course. And which Garmin product are you leary about? Is it a glass panel or just a GPS. Your club is eventually going to install a 430 or 530 in your plane anyway.
     
  4. Monpilot

    Monpilot Pre-Flight

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    It's a 530 in the club plane I'm using and I've fumbled around on it and it's very useful with weather on it.

    But i figure less complicated would make it easier to pass the checkride
     
  5. Ravioli

    Ravioli Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    Depends on the club.

    Some clubs will not allow instruction with a non-club instructor. The club I'm in only constricts the insurance checkout time to club approved instructors and we can use anybody we want for advanced work.

    This will sound slightly negative, but I think AF wants their CFI's flying AF planes because they like renting out their planes. The insurance bit smells a bit fishy. But that's just me being negative again.
     
  6. NKTFlyer

    NKTFlyer Pre-Flight

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    Once you have it down you'll really like it. It'll make your checkride easier. I swear. Especially if your plane isn't equipped with DME.
     
  7. tsts4

    tsts4 Line Up and Wait

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    The important thing is that you take your checkride in the plane you train in, whether it's AF's or the club's. Transitioning to a different plane after you get your rating is a non-issue.
     
  8. Monpilot

    Monpilot Pre-Flight

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    Thanks for all the input !

    I followed up and going outside the club will cost $100 per hour more so I'll stick with the club cfi and plane

    Even if it takes several hours longer the savings does add up.

    Thanks again!
     
  9. frfly172

    frfly172 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Use the plane your most comfortable in,pass the checkride,then worry about transitioning to another airplane. You can always hire an instructor for an hour or two of transition training.
     
  10. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Transitioning from a 172 to an Archer is a nonevent. Even the "numbers" are very similar, especially if the 172 is 180 HP.

    Garmin interfaces suck donkeys, but they are at least all very similar.

    I learned instruments in a 172 with dual VOR, DME (real) and a GTN650. It's important to understand how to use all of them, and set them up for the inevitable FU. You can fly a VOR approach using the GPS as a backup, and if you twist it wrong, you can recover trivially anywhere but on the final approach segment. Similarly, you can set up the second VOR for cross-radials and use the DME as primary, for some nonprecision approaches.

    Don't worry about slow unless you aren't progressing. Too fast means you don't retain.
     
  11. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    What do you mean by progressing slow? Why do you think that? In retrospect, I think learning the IFR properly will seem slow at first. I think properly done, you should spend a lot of time working out the command and performance aspects, and doing things like flying pattern A and B before leaping to approaches. When doing that, you are learning a lot of really good stuff that doesn't seem that overly significant at the time. But it is.

    I also echo the sentiment that if you learn it slowly, it may possibly stay with you longer.
     
  12. Blueangel

    Blueangel Line Up and Wait

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    Once you get the basics down, it comes faster. The trick for me anyways in IFR is to remain a few steps ahead of the airplane and think what's next and execute that correctly while handling ATC calls and flying a hold or approach correctly. For me, I plan to finish in my own plane because club rentals while less expensive are a pain to deal with in many ways.