Engine age vs hours

Discussion in 'Maintenance Bay' started by Roy Lee Kinser Jr, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Jmcmanna

    Jmcmanna Pre-takeoff checklist

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    When I bought my Arrow last year, the engine had 1300 hours and 29 years on it. It ran great, good compressions, no signs of corrosion during the prebuy. Five months later a fatigue crack appeared in the case underneath the #2 cylinder. Having to OH an engine less than 6 months after buying the airplane kinda hurt.
     
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  2. NordicDave

    NordicDave Line Up and Wait

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    Yup, but conventional wisdom in this thread is calendar time is no factor in engine longevity.
     
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  3. Greg Bockelman

    Greg Bockelman Administrator Management Council Member

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    That was your take away? If you had said “not necessarily a factor” I would have agreed with you n
     
  4. NordicDave

    NordicDave Line Up and Wait

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    I understand. I was more sarcastically commenting on the few edge cases of guys with “my engine is over 30 yers old and no problem here...”.
     
  5. Salty

    Salty En-Route PoA Supporter

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    I wouldn't say that. It's a factor. Just not the only factor.
     
  6. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    It just depends. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. ;)
     
  7. Hang 4

    Hang 4 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I have same exact engine and similar hours SMOH and years since overhaul. I've put ~200 hours on the plane, runs flawlessly so far. Good oil analysis results as well. Data point of one.
     
  8. bluerooster

    bluerooster Pattern Altitude

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    What I did: Bought a Cherokee ~550 SMOH, (15 years on OH) bought it as run out, and been flying it since. Here in the humid southeast, that's a gamble. Which, in my case has paid off. (so far) I fly it as often as I can. ~ 50hours/year, or more.
     
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  9. Tusayan

    Tusayan Filing Flight Plan

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    The only factor in all of the above that is relevant to fatigue cracking of crankcases in engine total time. Neither hours or years since overhaul have any relevance to crankcase fatigue cracks, since crankcases are not often replaced at overhaul and cracks do not grow unless the engine is running.

    My engine at 1100 hrs total time, 48 years old, is less likely to crack its cases than a freshly overhauled 10 year old engine with 2000 hrs total time on the cases. The only benefit of an overhaul in that regard is that it might catch a cracked case before the crack grows enough to leak or cause other worse symptoms.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
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  10. thomasdr72

    thomasdr72 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    A review of my best friend's old PA-28 180C showed that the original engine went 3600hrs with very little maintenance except for standard oil changes, etc. They replaced it with a factory new engine, and he bought it with around 1900 hours on that second engine. After running it to close to 2500 hrs TT on that engine, a hailstorm decided that he needed an airplane upgrade...

    More to the story: the next owner (perfectly flyable airplane) ran that engine for another 100hrs or so before it started making some metal. Then they pulled the trigger and put another factory new engine on the bird. Unfortunately, about 20hrs later a loose fuel line caused the thing to catch fire on the ground and total the airplane (for reals this time!).

    What's the moral to the story? You choose the punchline...