Craftsman tools.

Discussion in 'Maintenance Bay' started by Tom-D, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Grum.Man

    Grum.Man Line Up and Wait

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    Yea, around my area Lowes is way better. Way more inventory, way more employees. I don't know about the "pro" help as I don't often ask for it.
     
  2. mscard88

    mscard88 Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Aren't they HQ'd in Statesville, or Charlotte area?
     
  3. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    The thing I don't understand is that my nearest Lowe's is also the CLOSEST one to the Lowe's corporate headquarters. It's arguably THE WORST instance of the store I've ever had the misfortune to step into. The Troutman store on the other hand is beautiful. When I'm really working on a project I bop up to Hickory we have Tractor Supply, Northern Tools, Harbor Freight, Lowes, and Home Depot all in the same two mile stretch of road. If I can't find it there, I can probably do without it.

    Amusingly, Lowe's lists a SuperUnicom that's only 4 miles from my house but I've never heard it or have been able to kerchunk it up on the published frequency.
     
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  4. Grum.Man

    Grum.Man Line Up and Wait

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    Yes they are
     
  5. Grum.Man

    Grum.Man Line Up and Wait

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    The Troutman store is pretty amazing! One thing that is strange is how different every Lowes is. Troutman for example has a huge garden section but hardly any fans in the fan section. The best store for Bathroom stuff is the one across the street from North Lake Mall in Charlotte.
     
  6. bluerooster

    bluerooster Cleared for Takeoff

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    I have a pair of diagonal side cutters, that I got from Mac, about 25 years ago. They are like an extension of my right arm. If you see me they will be there too. I can whale on them with a hammer if I need to, with no worries about damaging them, (and I have on many occaisions).
    I got them because I knew that they will stand up to whatever punishment I can dish out. And I don't need to worry about breaking them, and having to leave to go buy another pair, because they won't break that easy.
     
  7. bluerooster

    bluerooster Cleared for Takeoff

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    S
    Snap-On bottom bin (lower price). But still very good quality. I have lots of Blue-Point stuff.
     
  8. SCCutler

    SCCutler Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

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    Lots of great tools under the J. H. Williams brand - and they're Snap-Ons, as well.
     
  9. FastEddieB

    FastEddieB Final Approach

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    As an aside, I managed to bend a 1/2" Craftsman breaker bar yesterday. Took an extension pipe and my body weight, but bend it did. Lug nuts on our Jeep as I swapped to our snow tire wheels yesterday preparing for the Great Blizzard of '17.

    Previously, all I had to do was carry it into any Sears and they'd throw it in a bin and give me a new one. Have to see how that goes now.
     
  10. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    flip it around.....and bend it back on the next lug. :lol:
     
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  11. Chip Sylverne

    Chip Sylverne En-Route

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    Fear is the poison of our lives.
    Might want to pick up a tube of anti-seize while you're there....
     
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  12. FastEddieB

    FastEddieB Final Approach

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    In all seriousness, that has to be done with caution.

    Most torque settings are based on dry threads, unless otherwise specified. Take a bolt to what "feels right" or to the specified torque on a bolt with antiseize can actually stretch the bolt and lead to failure.

    But thanks for the advice!
     
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  13. Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas En-Route

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    Very true. http://www.alliedsystems.com/pdf/Wagner/Forms/80/80-1057.pdf

    It depends on the anti-seize, of course, but this chart shows a 34% reduction in torque from lubricated 1/2-20 threads. If one puts it on the nut cone as well, it could get a lot worse, and from dry threads, the drop is huge. Snap goes the stud...
     
  14. CC268

    CC268 Cleared for Takeoff

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    Wow that video is crazy...spooky too. Yea Phoenix is almost all outdoor malls...I love them.
     
  15. SoCal RV Flyer

    SoCal RV Flyer Cleared for Takeoff

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    I hate the tire stores that ridiculously overtorque the lug bolts/nuts...I swear I've had some on there at 250 ft-lb when the spec is 110 or so. I use anti-seize and torque to about 100.

    Depends on the car, but the egregious over-torquing can potentially distort the brake disc, although snapping a stud is the bigger issue.

    Tools-wise, I've got a few Cobalt things (screwdrivers mostly and a 3/8" ratchet), and I'm pretty impressed at the quality for the price. And a Lowe's is right down the street, so there's that.
     
  16. 3393RP

    3393RP Cleared for Takeoff

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    Jeezus...what are you gonna do when you have a flat in the snow and all that's available to remove the tire is the stock lug wrench?

    I think your tire mounting procedure may need to be altered. Most aluminum wheel torque specs are between 100 and 130 lb/ft. I put a small dab of anti-seize on the studs and torque the lugs to 90.
     
  17. FastEddieB

    FastEddieB Final Approach

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    I had mounted the wheels prior, and only moderately snug.

    The bolts loosened with a creaking sound, leading me to suspect dissimilar metal corrosion between the steel bolt and the aluminum wheel. Maybe just a touch of anti-seize on the conical shoulder might be a thought.

    As an aside, once I could just not get a wheel off of our old 1993 Land Cruiser. Boards for leverage and even a sledge hammer on the tire and no joy. YouTube suggested replacing the wheel bolts but leaving them about 1/16" loose. And then drive the car and jerk the steering wheel left and right until you get a "clunk". I did, and it worked.
     
  18. ircphoenix

    ircphoenix Pattern Altitude

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    Of course you need the second YouTube video for how to chase down a tire rolling down the street... ;)
     
  19. cessna182b

    cessna182b Pre-takeoff checklist

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    When I was young (early '60s) I had occasion to change a wheel on my father's '59 Pontiac. I found out the hard way that the car had left hand threads on the left side (broke a stud). Never encountered any other vehicle since then that used that system. However,as a result, I know to look for an "L" on the end of any stud before attempting to remove the nut!

    Dave
     
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  20. FastEddieB

    FastEddieB Final Approach

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    To save someone some grief, bicycle pedal are also reverse-threaded on the left side!
     
  21. Skip Miller

    Skip Miller En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Dave, left hand threads/left side was very common in the 1950s. My parents always drove Chrysler Corp cars and that is what I learned on. Dunno about Ford.

    -Skip
     
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  22. ElPaso Pilot

    ElPaso Pilot Line Up and Wait

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    Ha! Just snapped a stud off my son's '68 Plymouth when I had to show him how to use some muscle to remove the "stuck" lugnuts on a driver's side wheel. Took the broken piece out of the wrench and saw the L stamped in the end of it.

    Whoops!
     
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  23. ksandrew

    ksandrew Pre-Flight

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    I have an employee who is a great fan of Kobalt tools from Lowe's, He just can't stop telling everyone how great they are and he explains that they are made by the same company that makes Snap On tools. So they must be great.
    If he said this once or twice it would not be too bad, but he goes on and on. Made by the same company that makes Snap On tools.

    After a few months of this I got tired of it. I explained to him that my $10.00 electric toaster was made by the same company that makes the jet engines for the Boeing 777, that is General Electric, and my toaster is a piece of crap. He has not said much since.

    Life is a barrel of fun.

    Ken
     
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  24. Matthew

    Matthew Touchdown! Greaser!

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  25. JimNtexas

    JimNtexas Pattern Altitude

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    Jim - In Texas!
    But about cell phone cases!
     
  26. Acrodustertoo

    Acrodustertoo Ejection Handle Pulled

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    I don't have a cell phone, so that eliminates that idea.
     
  27. JimNtexas

    JimNtexas Pattern Altitude

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    This pair of pliers is my best tool. It belonged to my Grandfather, who was a great influence in my life. I think it was probably purchased in the 1920s.

    It's hard to describe but it just fits my hand perfectly, it has real heft and perfect balance. I love it.

    And to be honest, whenever I pick it up I feel a direct connect to Grandad. Silly I guess, but there it is.

    My son isn't much into tools, but his son is.

    I plan to leave these to the Grandson when I'm sent to the recycling center in the sky.

    [​IMG]
     
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  28. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    I have a pair of those = lineman pliers, and they are very old
     
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  29. 3393RP

    3393RP Cleared for Takeoff

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    Are you guys sure about it being the driver's side? All of the Chrysler products had LH threads on the passenger, or right side of the vehicle.
     
  30. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    I don't know what they use to attach the wheels to the EZGO golf cars at the Textron factory but they were a bitch to remove even with an impact driver.
     
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  31. flyingbrit

    flyingbrit Filing Flight Plan

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    No, it's "left hand threads on the left hand side". My father's '66 Dodge was like that, as were pre '65 Buicks/Olds/Pontiacs. Supposedly this prevents the wheels from falling off if you forget to tighten the nuts. Google "left hand lug nuts" to read more.
     
  32. 3393RP

    3393RP Cleared for Takeoff

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    Huh. I was wrong about the Chrysler products.

    The large single wheel nut on IndyCars is left handed on the right side of the car. Same thing with a Bonneville streamliner I crewed on. If the car is going forward, it supposedly imparts a tightening force on the nut. I think that's pretty common on single nut wheels used in other forms of racing. I know about the IndyCars because I used to crew on them.

    This excerpt from a MoPar oriented website discusses single lug wheels, they are configured with LH on the right side of the vehicle.

     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  33. ElPaso Pilot

    ElPaso Pilot Line Up and Wait

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    Yup. Old Chrysler lug nuts are defiantly left hand thread on drivers side. Except for this one, which now has RH on all three except the drivers rear.

    If Boy ever lets a shop change or rotate his tires without a sticky note stuck on that hubcap with explicit instructions, he will quickly have that issue solved, too.
     
  34. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    hey....didn't you work there? :eek:
     
  35. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    Not EZGO, I worked for Overwatch (now Textron Geospatial) until they decided that I was making too much money and summarily fired me after 23 years (over the phone even).
     
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  36. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    well ya....there is that. :eek:
     
  37. thomasdr72

    thomasdr72 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Sears has been going downhill for the last 20 years, and taking the Craftsman line with it. However, I have oodles of Craftsman tools! Conversely, HFT has been steadily improving for at least the last decade, and I would put many of their pro series polished lifetime-warranty handtools on par with much of my Craftsman stock.

    My favorite thing about Craftsman is that after loosing my 3/8" Craftsman socket down a drain, or through a crack in the driveway (or wherever those damn things end up under the truck) I could go down to Sears (normally a special trip) and buy just that ONE socket to make the set whole again!

    Oh well, those days might stay with Stanley. I have a set of Stanley branded avionics tools that I can just go and buy replacement parts online for. But a small pair of wire cutters is also $20...

    (*crying inside*)
    -Dana
     
  38. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    cheap tools are good,, I spend half my time looking for the expensive ones, cheap ones I just buy another. you know when the owner finds them in their aircraft they are going to keep them. better the cheap ones than the snap on ones.
     
  39. ktup-flyer

    ktup-flyer Cleared for Takeoff

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    It's called a centerlock lol
     
  40. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    If they jam a flight control, you can just go get them back from the wreckage. ;-)