Best Puke Bag

brien23

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Brien
I like a empty instant coffee container with the snap top to open and close, holding a bag full of puke for the rest of the flight is probably not the best way. I do remember a puke bags on Delta airliners that had a maze printed on the back as a game for kids, looking at that if you were on the edge that would would probably do it. Something else to remember eat a banana taste the same going down as it does coming back up.
 

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gallon size ziplock. Make them stick their whole face in. Seal it up and no smell.
 
55 gallon trash bag...
This, and seriously. It has come in handy on more than one occasion.
ETA: Maybe it's 30 gal, either way it's never been close to full.

Nauga,
neck-deep
 
I use good quality large kitchen garbage bags. Large enough that the source can put their whole head and shoulders into the bag to catch all the effluent, but easier to roll/fold and store than larger garbage bags.
 
Anyone flying with me must sign a non-puke agreement. If they can't sign it, they can't fly with me.
 
Oof. Years ago I was getting ready to preflight and noticed the plane next to mine, a Warrior of some flavor, was sitting with the door open. Then I saw a CFI buddy wiping down a 3-ring binder notebook, muttering, “I should have known. I should have known.”

Turns out he told his student it would be OK for him to bring his kids along for a lesson. What the CFI didn’t know was it was going to be a bumpy day and the guy would take his kids to a Mexican place for lunch just before the flight.
 
Medical emesis bags. Can put a stack in the seat back. Fill, twist, close, bombs away.

50 Pack Emesis Bag, Disposable Vomit Bags, Aircraft & Car Sickness Bag, Nausea Bags for Travel Motion Sickness https://a.co/d/cH1IYCc
We keep those at the house as well, mostly for the kids in case they get sick. Easier to have them hold that than a trashcan while watching cartoons on the couch. Easy to seal off as well to keep smells from lingering.
 
Open the window and stick head out and vomit.:D
 
Try being a smooth operator and you won’t need barf bags!

My wife opened one up one time but has not had to use one yet because I am a smooth operator! Lol Just kidding.
 
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How about the ones provided by amm airline? Grab a couple from the seat back in front of you.
 
Open the window and stick head out and vomit.:D
I take it you've never had to clean dried puke off the outside of your airplane... :frown2:

A friend of mine reported that a folded sectional is NOT adequate.

Industrial strength ziploc bags work well.
 
Medical emesis bags. Can put a stack in the seat back. Fill, twist, close, bombs away.

50 Pack Emesis Bag, Disposable Vomit Bags, Aircraft & Car Sickness Bag, Nausea Bags for Travel Motion Sickness https://a.co/d/cH1IYCc
For reasons I'll not recount here, some years ago I used many of these emesis bags for several weeks.
Mine are green, and they work extremely well.
 
I take it you've never had to clean dried puke off the outside of your airplane... :frown2:

A friend of mine reported that a folded sectional is NOT adequate.

Industrial strength ziploc bags work well.
Or the inside. Speaking from experience, it's not easy to puke out of a Cessna window, but that airstream will surely spread puke all over the back of the interior if you try and fail.
 
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How about the ones provided by amm airline? Grab a couple from the seat back in front of you.

Another pilot in a company I was flying for in Kotzebue had a passenger use the seat back to take a dump...

I'd take barf over that any day...
 
I used to snag one whenever I was on a commercial flight. I've got a pile of them in the hangar but I've only ever had one passenger get sick.
 
Open the window and stick head out and vomit.:D
Many years ago, as a young inexperienced pilot, I decided it would be a good idea to take my wife and two small children for a ride in a 172. It was hot summer day in Arizona; get the picture? My wife asked if she could open the window. I thought, she wants to get some air and said ok. She opened the window and tried to puke outside. Guess where all the puke went? Yep, all over the two kids in the back seat who immediately reciprocated. Of course I didn't have any puke bags in the plane. It was a little tough getting that plane on the ground without losing it myself.
 
Many years ago, as a young inexperienced pilot, I decided it would be a good idea to take my wife and two small children for a ride in a 172. It was hot summer day in Arizona; get the picture? My wife asked if she could open the window. I thought, she wants to get some air and said ok. She opened the window and tried to puke outside. Guess where all the puke went? Yep, all over the two kids in the back seat who immediately reciprocated. Of course I didn't have any puke bags in the plane. It was a little tough getting that plane on the ground without losing it myself.
Thanks for that visual, Chuck. Terrible story yet comical. :D
 
I used to fly a lady fairly regularly that would show up to every flight with her own very large scented garbage bag. She had terrible motion sickness and every time she would get on a plane she would get sick. I never smelled the puke, just the scented bag, which I figured would prevent the cascading vomit effect. I thought it was a pretty good idea, so I started carrying a few of them in my backpack to hand out if the need arises. I also have it on good authority they are pretty good for taking a dump into between the front seats of a Caravan because you ate two gas station breakfast burritos.

Or so I’m told.
 
I take it you've never had to clean dried puke off the outside of your airplane... :frown2:

Heater pressure washes does a quick job of it. Or so I have been told. Or suspect, not that I know. :D

In CAP we use gallon zip lock or 10 gallon kitchen trash bags. The trash bags allow the whole head, so nothing misses the bag.

But I like the emisis bags.
 
Sitting here reading this thread right before breakfast...eerr I think I'll skip breakfast after reading this. :smilewinkgrin:
 
I used to fly a lady fairly regularly that would show up to every flight with her own very large scented garbage bag. She had terrible motion sickness and every time she would get on a plane she would get sick. I never smelled the puke, just the scented bag, which I figured would prevent the cascading vomit effect. I thought it was a pretty good idea, so I started carrying a few of them in my backpack to hand out if the need arises. I also have it on good authority they are pretty good for taking a dump into between the front seats of a Caravan because you ate two gas station breakfast burritos.

Or so I’m told.

When I was in Kotz one of the other pilots would regale us with a colorful account about the time he was flying a Navajo and had to take a dump. This was in the middle of winter with several layers of winter clothing. And all he had was a sic sak, and he got it all in the sic sak...

Thank goodness for A/P, and no passengers, and approach plates...
 
The best puke bag is an empty puke bag. :)

I remember years ago as a line guy, two guys in a teenager landing at our airport. The kid had gotten sick, and had pulled open the neck of his shirt and threw up into it. The pilot was laughing, “this kids my hero, I’d like to buy him one of your T-shirts”. :biggrin:
 
That’s hard to do in a PA-28…
It's actually hard to do in my cessna too. The only window that cab be opened is on the pilots door and no one is getting their head through it without major body contortions. My post was meant as a joke, but guess it was not too funny.

On a more serious level, I never had anyone do the vomit comet in my plane, a few close calls, but all were avoided by using a trick I learned when scuba diving off the Jersey Shore. Whenever anyone had sea sickness which in 4 plus foot seas on a good day was not uncommon, we would have sit outside on the bow of the boat and look at the horizon. Within a few minutes their nausea was gone. It has to do with a mismatch between what the eyes are sensing and the ears are sensing. By making them match the sensation is gone. In the plane I have the victim do basically the same thing. I have them look outside the front of the plane, make sure I am in level flight, and slow down a little to minimize any upward or downward excursions of the plane. It has always worked. It seems that every time someone has gotten sick in my plane they were looking down at the ground or out to the sides, and there was some turbulence, usually fairly light.
 
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