WiFi question

Discussion in 'Technical Corner' started by pmanton, Nov 3, 2018.

  1. pmanton

    pmanton Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    I have to get an internet signal to my wife's sewing room in the back of our hangar.
    small.jpg
    Our house is the one with the hangar door open and my red truck parked in front.
    Our computers, and router with WiFi, are located in the middle left of the house under the peaked place in the rood. The wife's sewing room runs across the back of the steel 50X50 hangar.

    WiFi doesn't penetrate the hangar. Cable would be difficult. There is no crawl space above the ceiling and I'm not about to get under the house .

    How can I do this guys? My wife puts up with living in the AZ outback for me so I'm gonna get her internet in her sewing room.

    Thanks

    Paul
    Salome, AZ
     
  2. MooneyDriver78

    MooneyDriver78 En-Route

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    Get a WIFI repeater, you probably will need one with an external antennas, mount the receiving antenna on the outside of hangar wall, on the side facing the house, probably underneath the roof connecting the two structures.
     
  3. wanttaja

    wanttaja En-Route

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  4. -KLB-

    -KLB- Pre-takeoff checklist

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    With metal siding, your best bet is likely power line repeater, and an extra access point in the sewing room. Everything else is just going to bounce most of the signal off the siding. Do note that I be heard that the power line repeaters don't like being on extension cords, and in some places, you may need to play to get them on the same side of the split phase.
     
  5. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Yeah, metal walls and radio signals are a problem. Google Faraday...
    Try the powerline repeater or pull a cable (how bad could it be?).
     
  6. MooneyDriver78

    MooneyDriver78 En-Route

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    The power line requires both to be on the same feed from the pole, probably the case here, so that would be easier.
     
  7. GRG55

    GRG55 Final Approach

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    Power line network should do the trick, as long as the hangar is wired off the same panel as the house.
     
  8. RJM62

    RJM62 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Unless you can get powerline to work, I can practically guarantee you that pulling a cable will be the easiest and most reliable way to do it.

    Rich
     
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  9. pmanton

    pmanton Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    Thanks all. I ordered the powerline stuff from Amazon.

    Cable, I sure hope not. I'm 80 and ain't gonna even try the under the house thing. Do you have ANY idea what kind of critters live under a house in the AZ desert. Then there's a concrete patio under the breezway between the house and the hangar. I'd have to bury it when it came out of the house. Ugh !

    I love living where I do but handymen are few and far between.

    Ah 80 out, 16% humidity, can't decide if I'll pull the plane out for a sunset hop, or wait till morning :D

    Paul
     
  10. Spring Ford

    Spring Ford Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Ah! you have made a decision ...

    1.
    If you have a spare phone pair between the locations you could consider these.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01BOD8C9W/ref=psdc_3015439011_t1_B002CLKFTG

    $200 ish for both ends.

    Reviews look OK.

    Might be tough to get going without some technical knowledge. You will need to terminate the cable appropriately into RJ-45 connectors.

    2.
    Even if the two buildings are on different phases, if you have both phases presented such that you can connect them with an ethernet cable you can use 4 power line adapters and connect it all up. The TP-Link website shows such an arrangement.

    https://www.tp-link.com/us/faq-406.html
    Q: Can TP-LINK powerline adapters work in different phases of three-phase circuit?
    There is a diagram.

    If the two circuits were electrically very separate you could use a fiber link for peace of mind.
    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Ethernet-Converter-Multi-Mode-MC200CM/dp/B003AVRLZI
    2 required and a fiber patch lead.
     
  11. RJM62

    RJM62 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    If powerline doesn't work, there may be a conduit between the house and the hangar through which a length of Ethernet cable could be pulled with a fish tape by any halfway-competent electrician.

    Assuming that the steel hangar is the only Faraday cage (in other words, that the signal is making it out of the house but not into the hangar), another option would be to mount an exterior wireless bridge on the side of the hangar facing the house, and drill a hole through the hangar wall to pass the wires through. Most of them are WiFi to Ethernet, but it's possible to wire them WiFi to Ethernet to WiFi, basically using the outdoor one as a bridge and the indoor one as an AP.

    There also are other options, such as an indoor bridge with an outdoor antenna.

    Powerline is finicky. In your case, I think the biggest "if" will be whether the hangar is fed by a subpanel. I've never had much luck using powerline across panels. But it's worth a shot. If it works, it'll be the easiest way to do it.

    Rich
     
  12. Kenny Phillips

    Kenny Phillips En-Route

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    Hmmm ... rattlesnakes, scorpions, gila monsters, and tarantulas?
     
  13. Unit74

    Unit74 Final Approach

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    Leave politics out of this please...... he is looking for WiFi answers.
     
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  14. Ghery

    Ghery Final Approach

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    They also have to be on the same leg. If they are on opposite legs it's doubtful that it would work.

    And, as someone who has dealt with PLT professionally, try the wires. Unless you don't care about listening to shortwave radio.
     
  15. bflynn

    bflynn Final Approach

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    To run cable under the house, get a remote controlled toy tank and a line of kite string. Use the tank to run the string and the string to run the cable. Yes, it’s laying on the ground, but it will work. With large enough track, this can work in overhead spaces too.
     
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  16. pmanton

    pmanton Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    Powerline stuff will be here Tomorrow. Plan is to open the packaging carefully so return will be easy, if it doesn't work.

    If I have to run cable I guess I'll find a handyman who doesn't mind critters.
     
  17. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Rich’s idea has some merit. You could add a wireless AP in bridge mode just outside the hangar pass a wire through and then add another AP inside. You would need two APs, one of them capable external. You would have to get power to the external. That can be done with a PoE injector just inside. Look at the Ubiquity APs. The standard one does internal and external.
     
  18. pmanton

    pmanton Cleared for Takeoff PoA Supporter

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    I tried the tp-link AV2000 Powerline from house to hangar. Even though the hangar is on a sub panel, they functioned well. The wife's sewing & quilt room is on another sub-panel the they showed a weak signal. 2 sub-panels were too much for them. However I'll plug them into a hangar receptacle and make up a patch cable through the wall into her room.
    Success!! I'm gonna get lucky :p
     
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  19. cessna182b

    cessna182b Line Up and Wait

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    If that works for you - good enough. If it were me I would look at using outdoor-rated Ethernet cable, running it around the back of the house, then aerial (if necessary) to span the gap between the buildings. Then run it inside or outside around the back of the hangar - whichever is easier. Types with and without a steel messenger wire are available.

    I would suggest a wireless bridge such as the ones offered by Ubiquiti - but the distance is so short that they would be overkill (I have a 13-mile link in service at work using Nanostation M5s that works great).

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
  20. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    There are a few articles out there on making a passive wifi repeater work. Essentially, you have two antennas and a short piece of coax. You poke one out of your hangar somewhere so it can receive the signal from the house and hang the other end inside your steel building.