The “ins” and “outs” of tires

Discussion in 'Lessons Learned' started by Robin Hood, Jul 7, 2019.

  1. Robin Hood

    Robin Hood Pre-Flight

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    Recently upon landing I had the unfortunate experience of a flat tire. As the mains settled something just wasn’t right, there was no sound to give away the new development just a weird feeling that the right main was too “soft”. Then slowly as the speed decreased the plane gently turned to the right and stopped. After getting out and analyzing what had just taken place we pulled the plane to parking using a mule and tow-bar. My question is why did the tire blow? Looking back I remember that the blown tire was more inflated then the left tire and it was a hot day. Other than these factors, I am clueless as to why the tire went and I’m really not sure when it went except that it must have happened right at touchdown. Has anyone else experienced this and what can I do to prevent it happening again?
     
  2. rk911

    rk911 Line Up and Wait PoA Supporter

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    had a nose wheel go flat one time. landing and taxi went and felt fine but it was flat nonetheless. ground crew tried adding air...no go. tube had split at the seam. crew chief chalked it up to CCC...’cheap Chinese c**p”.
     
  3. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    You never know. Could be something as simple as someone using baby powder instead of tire talc when assembling the wheel.
     
  4. Salty

    Salty En-Route PoA Supporter

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    What’s the difference?
     
  5. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking PoA Supporter

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    Tell me the difference?
     
  6. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking PoA Supporter

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    cleanliness standard.
    Both are pulverized soap stone. granule size is another
     
  7. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    Oh boy, my first test. Baby powder has stuff in it that can cause the residual powder to pill or ball up causing a lump or relatively un-smooth surface between the tire and the tube which over time, can wear holes in the tube. Notice I said "residual" powder. Any mechanic worth his salt will ensure that none exists prior to putting the tube in the tire.
     
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  8. GRG55

    GRG55 Final Approach

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    It happens. Not all that unusual. And more likely the tube, not the tire that failed. How old are the tubes? Rubber ages.
     
  9. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    I have tubes that have been thru several tires......:eek:
     
  10. GRG55

    GRG55 Final Approach

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    Try landing without the brakes locked up. :D
     
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  11. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking PoA Supporter

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    It's not rubber anymore. It's some sort of synthetic goop.
     
  12. GRG55

    GRG55 Final Approach

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    I've heard complaints that Chinese made tubes are making their way into the system. I'd prefer to avoid that too.

    I just replaced the tube in the tailwheel of the Husky last week. Developed a slow leak that rapidly became not so slow. 23 years old, that's long enough.
     
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  13. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking PoA Supporter

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    At one of the IA seminars I attended, I told the Michelin rep the only way their tubes would hold air was to put a half a can of fix-a-flat in them.
    That Brought the house down.
    I never saw my PMI laugh that hard before.
     
  14. Clip4

    Clip4 En-Route

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    I used baby powder for years, there was never any balling up of the powder when I changed the tires, but I also never used an excessive amount.
     
  15. old_biker

    old_biker Pre-Flight

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    never heard of it, I now want to research it, but I have used baby powder on literally hundreds of motorcycle tires, I worked at a custom bike shop around a decade in my younger days. I had 1 tire fail, that I am aware of,& it was a piece of rubber that flaked off inside of tire, & punctured tube, it happened on my personal bike.
     
  16. Robin Hood

    Robin Hood Pre-Flight

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    I'm not sure how old they are, I bought the plane in Jan. I suppose it may be in the logs
     
  17. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    so....maybe you just have a dirty diaper? Just say'n....o_O
     
  18. Skyrys62

    Skyrys62 Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    Meet the Fokkers
    It's the other kind of Chinese tariff.

    They tear if you land on them hard :rolleyes1:
     
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  19. Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas Final Approach

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    I replaced several tubes that failed because they were being chafed by a sticker inside the tire. Goodyear had used a hard plastic overlay on the sticker, and it would peel loose a bit and the tube rubbed on it as the tire rotated. I filed SDRs on the problem. I started taking those stickers out.
     
  20. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Watch it... some baby powder is cornstarch these days.
     
  21. Checkout_my_Six

    Checkout_my_Six Final Approach

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    bet that could cause a rash of problems.....o_O
     
  22. WannFly

    WannFly En-Route

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    I have had 2 flats right after I exited the runway, both times at night, both times with a CFI on board, I have a sneaky suspicion that both times the CFI thought I didn’t have enough right rudder, places their feet on the paddle and locked the brakes by mistake. That’s my story I am sticking to it
     
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  23. hindsight2020

    hindsight2020 En-Route

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    Ever since my last pinched stem im paranoid about low inflation and sharp steering with diff braking while at taxi speed (typical brisk turnoff from ret after landing). So I run those mains slightly overinflated, bring a bicycle foot pump with me on the road, and no longer do sharp steering at taxi speeds. Always brake positively OR steer sharply, no longer both. My voodoo my superstitions. So far so good.
     
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  24. Huckster79

    Huckster79 Line Up and Wait

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    That’s one time it’s good to be in a nose dragger!
     
  25. Zeldman

    Zeldman Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Or too much baby powder and you will give the tires and or tube cancer...
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 6:07 PM
  26. Clip4

    Clip4 En-Route

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    And corn starch would do what?

    AKRON, Ohio, Dec. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Taking time to stretch and add a dose of talcum powder may sound like a gymnast getting ready for the high bar, but those practices also apply to mounting aircraft tires.

    Essential to providing proper tire life, correctly mounting aircraft tires requires following the detailed mounting procedures provided by tire and wheel manufacturers for both tube-type and tubeless tires.

    Larry Rapsard, product support manager for The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company (NYSE: GT), says proper mounting of aircraft tires calls for a 12-hour stretch after the initial mounting.

    "All tires, particularly bias tires, will stretch after the initial inflation, causing a volume increase and a corresponding drop in pressure. For that reason, tires should not be placed in service until they've been inflated for a minimum of 12 hours and reinflated if necessary," Rapsard said.

    After the 12-hour stretch period, it is highly recommended that the tire/wheel assembly be given a 24-hour diffusion check to make sure the assembly is holding inflation properly. Tubeless assemblies, in particular, can lose pressure through the valve, o-ring, fuse plug, overpressure plug, tiny cracks in the wheel, etc.

    When mounting a tube-type tire, a light coat of talc on the tube before mounting will help the tube fit inside the tire. After mounting, first inflate, then deflate, then re-inflate the tire. This helps to equalize the tube inside the tire, minimizing the chance for pinching and folding.

    When mounting a tubeless tire, torque the wheel bolts properly and inflate the tire to the recommended inflation pressure with dry nitrogen.

    After mounting aircraft tires, check tire pressures daily when they are at ambient temperature, since tire/wheel assemblies can lose as much as 5 percent of inflation pressure in 24 hours. By observing these procedures for mounting aircraft tires, you'll experience better results from your tires.

    These tips and more are covered in detail in Goodyear's Tire Care & Maintenance Manual. For information about Goodyear aviation tires and dealer locations, visit www.goodyearaviation.com.

    SOURCE The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company
     
  27. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    Sounds like a Cherokee 140 which calls for 4 ply in the parts manual. I read the arguments here and elsewhere that although many install 6 ply, it isn't correct. Something about sidewall flex and helping out the struts on landing.
     
  28. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Unlike talc, turn to goo if there's the least bit of moisture in the mix. The Goodyear document you excerpted says to use talc not cornstarch.