T route with higher MEA than V airway it overlaps

Discussion in 'Cleared for the Approach' started by airheadpenguin, Jun 16, 2020.

  1. airheadpenguin

    airheadpenguin Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I'm planning a flight out to Ohio and noticed that the overlapping segments of T216 and V58 in PA have a MEA of 4200 on the T route but a lower MEA of 4000 for V58.

    Its not based on COM reception, do T routes have a wider airway width that could be impacted by terrain?
     

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  2. airheadpenguin

    airheadpenguin Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Looking at Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_airways#:~:text=When VORs are less than,14.8 km) total width). I'm still confused because the Victor airways a protected 8 miles on either side of the centerline for segments that are less than 102 nm

    T-routes are said to have 6nm of obstacle protection (primary + secondary) on either side of the center line with the mention that it supports 10nm of protected airspace on either side of the centerline. The way that I read that is that additional 4nm are protected from aircraft but not obstacles. So I'm left still puzzled as to why the higher MEA would impact the route
     
  3. RussR

    RussR Pattern Altitude

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    While I don't have an answer for the difference in MEAs, I need to point out that the part of the linked article that refers to T-routes and 10 nm wide, is under the heading of "Canada".

    In the U.S., at least, T-routes are, like V-routes, 4 nm either side of centerline with a secondary area (what you might call a "buffer" area) another 2 nm each side. The T-route widths, however, do not expand when you get past 51 nm like V-routes.

    Source: FAAO 8260.58A, but you need to refer to about three different paragraphs to piece this information together. I can provide more detail if you want it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2020