Renting a plane from a friend

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Anil Sahai, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. Anil Sahai

    Anil Sahai Filing Flight Plan

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    Hi,

    I am a student pilot - have been endorsed for solo. Can I legally fly a
    plane borrowed from a friend, and log hours?

    What are other consequences in terms of insurance, liability, etc.?

    Best regards;

    ... Anil
     
  2. paflyer

    paflyer Final Approach

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    What insurance do you have now?
     
  3. luvflyin

    luvflyin Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Yes. If it is the same type and model you are endorsed for. I think, maybe
     
  4. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    I am certain you will not meet their open pilot warrantee clause of their insurance policy,, so CYA in that area.
     
  5. genna

    genna Cleared for Takeoff

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    As long as your endorsement Make and Model matches your friends plane there are no legal restrictions i don't think....

    Insurance... well, big "depends". Private plane and insurance? Likely they may have a problem with a student solo. Not legal to rent either. Having renters insurance may help, but fine print is the key here. If it's a rental plane to begin with, then you should have no problems.
     
  6. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Unless your solo endorsement comes with a tail number, it only matters what make and model the airplane is, and any limitations. Read your endorsement to see if it's legal.

    Insurance may be another story entirely.
     
  7. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    So true, I saved a bunch of cash making my open pilot warrantee clause for the Fairchild say 500 hours in make and model. which precludes most everybody
     
  8. Anil Sahai

    Anil Sahai Filing Flight Plan

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    Thanks guys!
    Looks like insurance issue will be tricky. I rather not take the risk!

    Best regards;
     
  9. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Also you may want to let your CFI in on your plans. Just saying.
     
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  10. Adam Brice

    Adam Brice Filing Flight Plan

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    There is much more to the insurance issue than has been addressed here. Even if you meet the "open pilot warranty" of the owners policy it does not solve everything. Unless he has a "non-subrogation clause" in his policy, his insurance company can pursue you to recuperate some of their loss associated with the accident. I'm a producer (aka agent or broker) for a major agency in the US and would be happy to chat more but in the interest of not agitating the forum rule police I'd prefer to do it via PM.
     
  11. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    How can you meet the open pilot warrantee when you are not a pilot?
     
  12. coloradobluesky

    coloradobluesky En-Route Gone West

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    Depends on the endorsement but usually no. Most instructors only endorse students in the planes the instructor and the student train in. The plane owners insurance usually only covers the owner.

    There probably is a way to get insurance coverage, but it costs more money for more insurance coverage. And it has to be done right.
     
  13. MassPilot

    MassPilot Cleared for Takeoff

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    My solo endorsement just said C172 and made no mention of tail numbers.
     
  14. Ravioli

    Ravioli Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Keep in mind that your solo endorsement is for a make/model and probably not a tail number, BUT you have to be also endorsed for flights to another airport, and each solo XC needs to be reviewed and signed by your CFI.

    Is your buddies airplane on the same field?

    Lot's of stuff that all sounds like more risk in doing this than not. And student pilots should be learning to be risk averse, not how to skimp on training costs.
     
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  15. Adam Brice

    Adam Brice Filing Flight Plan

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    They generally require -
    1. a current and valid FAA Private, Commercial, or ATP pilot certificate with ratings and endorsements
    applicable to your aircraft and sometimes including an instrument rating.
    2. if required, a current and valid FAA Medical Certificate;
    3. if required, a current and valid Biennial Flight Review;
    4. sometimes a minimum number of total logged hours as pilot-in-command of aircraft, of which sometimes includes applicable hours in
    the aircraft meeting the following descriptions:
    a. same make and model as your aircraft
    b. aircraft with the same type of retractable and/or tail-wheel landing gear as your
    c. aircraft being flown
    d. multi-engine powered fixed wing aircraft
    e. turbine powered aircraft
    f. fixed wing seaplanes
    g. rotorcraft
    h. sailplanes

    So it precludes non-pilots, student pilots and often pilots with limited experience. Really the Pleasure and Business policies aren't created to take on the liability of training pilots in the aircraft other than the named pilots. Probably too much info... but I hope that it helps.