Q: Rusty Private to LSA class airplane BFR/retraining

rhkennerly

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rhkennerly
I need some expert guidance on how to proceed. I'm shopping for an Aeronca, etc., which qualifies as an LSA. I'd like to go pick it up and fly back Xc.

In the meantime, I want to get back into the left seat and get current with a BFR.

I think I've got a good handle on the ground school part, having spent the Pandemic Winter doing online courses. I've also been studying a lot of airspace videos--what a mess.

I can't find any LSA instructors or planes locally (3rd class is going to be too long with the OKC backlog and likely SI inquiries).
So using a flight school C-172 and instructor, how does retraining work:
  • when you don't have a medical? Certainly, I can't solo a 172.
  • Can I do a BFR in a 172 without a medical?
 
Hire an instructor (doesn’t need to be a CFI-S) to ride back with you in the newly purchased Champ. Refresher, flight review, and model specific training all in one.
 
How rusty is rusty?

You can get started and flight reviewed in a 172 (I did it in a 152). No medical required.

You will want (and the insurance company may require) some dual in your Aeronca as well. You could do it all in the Aeronca, but if you will need a bunch of practice because it's been years, knocking some of it out in the 172 won't hurt. Particularly if your purchase is some distance away and you don't want to spend a week or so at a remote location just to get up to speed.
 
Depending on how long ago your last medical was, basicmed might be an option? If so, then you're not limited to LSA.
 
So using a flight school C-172 and instructor, how does retraining work:
  • when you don't have a medical? Certainly, I can't solo a 172.
  • Can I do a BFR in a 172 without a medical?

For a BFR flight, the CFI can (and in your case, will) be the PIC for the flight, so you do not need a medical at all. Easy peasy.

If you want to *solo* one of their 172's, then that's a different and more complicated question... but a BFR just involves ground instruction and flight instruction with the CFI. For that, all you need is a credit card.
 
Hire an instructor (doesn’t need to be a CFI-S) to ride back with you in the newly purchased Champ. Refresher, flight review, and model specific training all in one.
^^^^ This.

Also, if you're buying a tail dragger, getting some tailwheel hours will help, on your plane and with insurance.

Also, also, if you're thinking about buying a type you're not familiar with some hours will be very useful. I.e. if you don't know if you'll like heel brakes, find out early.

Everything said so far is on-point too.
 
You could do it all in the Aeronca, but if you will need a bunch of practice because it's been years, knocking some of it out in the 172 won't hurt.

Except for the rental fee and an instructor to ride along. Might be more cost-effective to have the plane ferried here and pay an instructor for the time. Probably a toss-up on cost vs paying an instructor to ride back with me to build hours, get the tailwheel endorsement, and BFR out of the way.
 
Also, if you're buying a tail dragger, getting some tailwheel hours will help, on your plane and with insurance.

that, too. I pushed L-19s in Vietnam, but when I got my PPL, tail wheel endorsements were not required. I'd really like to find an L-19, but they're too expensive for my pocket. Still, you could do some impressive **** with 235 HP and 60 degrees of flaps on a Cessna 175 wing.
 
that, too. I pushed L-19s in Vietnam, but when I got my PPL, tail wheel endorsements were not required. I'd really like to find an L-19, but they're too expensive for my pocket. Still, you could do some impressive **** with 235 HP and 60 degrees of flaps on a Cessna 175 wing.

Just to clarify, with your L-19 time, strictly, you don't need the actual tailwheel endorsement. 61.31 (i)(2) 'grandfathers' a pilot with PIC in a tailwheel before April 15, 1991. However, if it's really been that long, the brush-up training/flight review hours you'd want will probably be equivalent to getting the actual endorsement anyway.
 
Just to clarify, with your L-19 time, strictly, you don't need the actual tailwheel endorsement. 61.31 (i)(2) 'grandfathers' a pilot with PIC in a tailwheel before April 15, 1991.

IDKT! Tnx. But ur right. I’d need a real TW refresher anyway. The L-19 is tall & narrow beast, a handful on concrete. I need something a but more docile anyway.
 
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