Maneuvers for new instrument students

Discussion in 'Cleared for the Approach' started by Flyingfanatic, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. Flyingfanatic

    Flyingfanatic Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I just got my CFII a few weeks ago, finally (had my cfi since 1994).

    I've heard of some maneuvers that instructor's give new instrument students to help them build their scan. Something specific like a 90 degree turn at half standard rate then climb 1000'... etc.

    Does anyone have a maneuver they think is effective in helping new IFR students?
     
  2. Bill Jennings

    Bill Jennings Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    FAA patterns A & B, CFII had me do them until competent, then we started on approaches, etc.

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  3. jordane93

    jordane93 Final Approach

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    You should always start with basic attitude flying. Make sure they can do a standard rate turn to a heading, constant airspeed climbs/descents, tracking/intercepting courses, etc. Steep turns under the hood is also a good exercise.
     
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  4. murphey

    murphey Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Make sure you work with the student doing the patterns...explain each step, when something goes wrong, explain what went wrong and how to fix it. Don’t keep doing them over and over with no feedback to the student. Fastest way to lose a student.
     
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  5. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    And before you start in on these patterns, establish what the normal configuration (power settings, etc...) is for each of these flight regime (NORMAL CRUISE, LOW (APPROACH) CRUISE, as well as your climb and descent configurations.
     
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  6. Michael A

    Michael A Pre-Flight

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    +1 here.
     
  7. Flyingfanatic

    Flyingfanatic Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I was going to start with this and then move to something more advanced. Thanks!
     
  8. bobmrg

    bobmrg En-Route

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    It is boring for the instructor, but IMHO the first five hours should be devoted solely to attitude instrument flying. When you student can change speeds without changing altitude, transition from cruise to climb/descent smoothly, make level turns without losing altitude....all under the hood...you can advance to navigation and communication. Flying the airplane solely by instrument reference has to become automatic, without involving any extra brain cells. Patterns A and B are good, but you can make up your own exercises.

    Bob
     
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  9. j1b3h0

    j1b3h0 Line Up and Wait

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    I agree with Mr. Gardner, but would add minimum controllable airpeed, with turns to headings, climbs and descents, even stalls, power on and off. Student should be able to fly the airplane VERY precisely under the hood before the “navigation” stuff.
     
  10. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Frankly, while a student should well able to handle the aircraft prior to instrument training, MCA and stalls are largely irrelevant. A student should not be anywhere close to those regimes and if they do (let's say in recovery from unusual attitudes), they should be immediately moving toward the straight-and-level mode. What they need is control of constant rate turns and level and constant rate climbs in turns and straight at both cruise and approach airspeeds.
     
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  11. N1120A

    N1120A Pattern Altitude

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    My CFI/I actually had me do the Oscar Pattern (look up Jason Miller's video about it) during my PPL training, as well as my IFR training. It is very disorienting, especially at night, but being able to fly it well is a great tool to increase success.
     
  12. tree96

    tree96 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    came here to say this. I benefited greatly from this technique.
     
  13. Sam D

    Sam D Cleared for Takeoff

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    Link

     
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  14. j1b3h0

    j1b3h0 Line Up and Wait

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    I think students should be able to fly the aircraft well in all regimes by reference to instruments, then when introduced to the easy maneuvers of IFR flying the student can concentrate on the cerebral stuff, navigation, etc,.
     
  15. N1120A

    N1120A Pattern Altitude

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    Another thing - instrument training really started clicking when I stopped thinking about what we were expected to do on the PPL checkride. The training is largely based on getting into the soup as soon as you hit 400' AGL, so you aren't exactly coming back and the concept of Vy and Vx really should go out of the window at that point. Your head stays so much more level when you pitch for 500 FPM than when you're trying to go for best rate or angle, meaning your inner ear works better. Also, the controls stay much more effective.