How much do bush pilots know about First Aid?

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by skipone, Dec 3, 2020.

  1. skipone

    skipone Filing Flight Plan

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    Would you say that a large number of bush pilots are proficient in First aid or know just enough to handle minor issues?

    And if you were stuck in the wild with a friend who had a broken leg and you had zero help, would you know enough to splint that leg?
     
  2. AA5Bman

    AA5Bman Line Up and Wait

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    I don’t think the answer is to know how to splint a leg and walk out to safety. The answer is more like how to not bleed out, how to not die of hypothermia, and in being prepared to get help (ie how to smash that SOS button in your GPS messenger), and that goes for anyone flying a plane.

    As an aside... “bush pilots”... I wonder when the aviation community will get off this kick.
     
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  3. 3393RP

    3393RP En-Route

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    Broken legs are basic stuff, I think just about everyone can handle that. The injuries that freak out people are the ones that require immediate and proper care. That obviously includes heart attacks and strokes. The ones I try to educate others on are brachial and femoral artery breaches. You have just seconds to properly treat those injuries.

    I had a good friend die while deer hunting near Socorro, NM. He was a party kind of guy, and was hunting with his good time buddies. One of them shot a deer, and while he was running down a hill to inspect his kill with the rifle over his shoulder, he slipped and almost fell. The gun discharged and struck my friend in the upper arm. It severed his brachial artery.

    There were four other people in this group of idiots, and none of them were smart enough to apply a tourniquet to my friend's arm. They were miles from any help. He died on that hill, bled to death while the others stood around and watched it happen. Many people are scared to apply a tourniquet to an extremity. They have heard claims that an improperly applied tourniquet will result in the loss of the limb. They don't understand that losing a limb is preferable to bleeding out. My friend died almost 35 years ago, and I'm still angry that it happened.

    Are you prepared to intervene in a situation that is life or death? I've done it several times. I have enough training and confidence to do it. I'm not bragging, I just want to point out that training gives you the confidence. Situations that require immediate action will arise in your life. Don't be the person that stands around and watches someone die.
     
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  4. skipone

    skipone Filing Flight Plan

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    I agree. It's important to do something than nothing. Applying a tourniquet above the wound would have at least slowed the flow of blood.

    Splinting isn't so much about walking out as it is preventing further injury, and reducing pain.

    In the best scenario help is close by, help arrives, but if you're in a remote area, you forgot XYZ, or have a dead battery, or whatever, it's good to know at least the basics.
     
  5. Jeff Oslick

    Jeff Oslick En-Route

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    I highly recommend a Wilderness First Aid class for anyone who spends time in the back country, or regularly flying over remote areas. Basic first aid is important, but you need to get familiar with what equipment you need and how to handle cases where help could be many hours or days away.

    Sources:
    https://www.nols.edu/en/coursefinder/courses/wilderness-first-aid-WFA/
    https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/wilderness-first-aid-basics.html
    https://www.ecsinstitute.org/training-programs/firstaid
     
  6. nrpetersen

    nrpetersen Line Up and Wait

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    3393RP - Thanks for that valuable post.
     
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  7. Rgbeard

    Rgbeard Pattern Altitude

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    @skipone

    Please - tell me what's up here. You're asking really specific questions.

    Are you trying to sort through some kind of phobias?
    Or - (my guess) are you an author trying to write a novel?
     
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  8. cowman

    cowman En-Route PoA Supporter

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    There’s no first aid in typical civilian pilot training. I’d say like anyone else it’s just what you’ve been exposed to, taken a class in, or bothered to learn on your own.
     
  9. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    I could set a leg. I've done it. I've also administered cardiac drugs and defibrillated (old school manual unit) people. But I spent several years as a paramedic (we've got a few on the airport).
     
  10. Lindberg

    Lindberg En-Route

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    And what about a broken femur that can become a severed femoral artery.....

    To answer the OP, if you want to generalize, probably about the same as the general population. "Bush pilots" are likely to be "outdoorsy" types, so let's say about the same as the general outdoorsy population.
     
  11. Zeldman

    Zeldman Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Just enough to get by. Pilots are usually a ''in charge'' type person that would not stand by and do nothing.

    I had no training whatsoever in first aid at any of the bush outfits I flew for. Except for learning the location of the first aid kit and survival gear on the plane. (nose compartments are a bad place for those items)

    Everything I know was just from basic first aid training throughout the years.
     
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  12. LB 408A

    LB 408A Pre-Flight

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    I believe most pilots strive to become professional which includes the ability to handle many situations whether it be medical, mechanical or managerial. I think that any bush pilot will describe themselves as a pilot first before adding bush as a describer depending upon the company they are keeping. Sounds like a passenger question to me anyway.