Fun IFR Platform ?????

Discussion in 'Cleared for the Approach' started by lolachampcar, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Bill Watson

    Bill Watson Cleared for Takeoff

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    That was my dream after flying IFR in my old Maule for a few years, and now I'm living it. An RV-10 with WAAS, synthetic vision, NEXRAD, 3 EFIS screens, and a 2 axis AP running on a robust electrical system with dual alts, batts, and buses. I can take off, engage the AP and not touch the stick until I break out at 200' looking at the numbers.

    Getting where I want, when I want, most of the time, is it's own reward.

    Now if I could just add FIKI....


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  2. tsts4

    tsts4 Line Up and Wait

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    Well to each his own but your idea fun and my idea of fun is apparently vastly different.
     
  3. BigBadLou

    BigBadLou En-Route

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    Why did you become a pilot then? *scratchhead*
    You might be on the wrong webpage, this one is for people who like flying (for our very strange and vastly different reasons).
     
  4. tsts4

    tsts4 Line Up and Wait

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    WTF? I love to fly--I even built my own airplane to do so which took dedication far beyond anything we're discussing here. I just didn't think IR traing was fun and don't think that IFR flying, particularly in IMC is all that fun either. YMMV...I do derive satisfaction from it but I wouldn't categorize it as fun. For me IFR is more a means to an end--sorry that ruffles your sensibilities.
     
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  5. AcroBoy

    AcroBoy Line Up and Wait

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    You are correct of course. Mine has a 430 and stec 30. If I were concerned that it made that much difference in my rec aerobatics I'd go on a diet!
     
  6. BigBadLou

    BigBadLou En-Route

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    I definitely misunderstood your post. Which is not hard on them Ynterwebs without the interaction of human beings face-to-face over beer and such. If that happens (beer face-to-face), I will gladly explain to you how I love flying. I will gladly explain it to anyone, especially over beer. ;) IFR or not, commandeering an airplane is just always fun time for me.
    And if you notice my response in the Fighter Pilot Shortage thread, you might get the idea that I don't like flying just a little. Feel absolutely free to call me strange. (insert honest smiley here)
     
  7. NoHeat

    NoHeat En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Breaking out of the clouds and seeing the runway right where it should be. That's fun, for me.

    Getting task-saturated just before an approach, not so much fun. An autopilot helps a lot with that.

    So to answer the OP's question, an IFR plane with an autopilot, to make the experience more pleasant. Of course, you still have to train to hand fly as well.
     
  8. Bill Watson

    Bill Watson Cleared for Takeoff

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    Yep, we all need to respect our fellow pilots' love of flying, a love which comes in many different flavors.

    I'm one of those that loves it all but what I love has changed over time. I'll always be a glider pilot and yet have little desire to return to it. My first plane had a tail wheel which I loved but the plane I built sits on it's nose. Building is the most rewarding task I've ever undertaken and yet I only have one build in me. And the plane I built was intended to be an all weather cruiser where IFR capability, speed and utility are the ultimate measures. Boring for some but it's my fun thing these days.

    Now if I can just finish the electric powered mini-RC Pilatus Porter that my father started 20 years ago, my year will be complete.


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  9. asgcpa

    asgcpa En-Route

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    I bought a Cirrus SR22 and finished in that
     
  10. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Hmm I don't have a TW endorsement, and I have plenty of TW time. :dunno:
     
  11. lolachampcar

    lolachampcar Pre-Flight

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    If you are like me and older than dirt, you may be grandfathered in :)
     
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  12. James331

    James331 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Think you level of enjoyment in the IFR world is going to be mostly dependent on your CFII, his level of comfort and experience in IMC/IFR, the airframe doesn't really matter, all the control movements and very slight, you wouldn't get much more enjoyment out of a extra 330L IFR than you would a C172, it's all slow easy rate 1 stuff.

    The big one, find a CFII who worked in the IFR world, preferable one who had to do all his own flight planning and worked in a more adhoc type environment. A good CFII will make lots of your flight actual IMC scenarios, hey lets get a burger here, it's nice here, well just start off VFR and pull a IFR later, or getting a IFR in the ground, basically working things into a real world type scenario and having you actually do it. Also good to find one who knows when to use a sim, if even just MS flight sim.

    As for the plane, something basic, cheap and easily to schedule.
     
  13. jbDC9

    jbDC9 Pre-Flight

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    Can I have 2 old ARC nav/coms? And maybe an ADF? Now that's fun instrument flying!

    Back in my Dark Age freight dogs days ('91) hauling checks in a C-310R, we had a couple of airplanes equipped as such. I recall one leg on a cold, snowy night, MKC-MDW; 2 VORs and an ADF was my radio stack. No DME, HSI, heading bug, autopilot, radar, no nuthin'; radios were straight out of a 152... but we were good for known icing! Chicago approach was kinda busy and gave me an intersection hold for 10 minutes or so. That was a long 10 minutes...

    Nowadays I prefer the 737 with dual everything, Cat III autoland and coupled RNP approach capability. It's like magic... but in my 310 days I was a much better instrument pilot.
     
  14. SbestCFII

    SbestCFII Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I have a Warrior, and have instructed in a lot of other platforms as pilots sometimes bring their own planes. As with primary training, a Warrior or 171 class airplane are both good, stable platforms. Don't get your rating in anything smaller and don't get a rating and never see a cloud. Just make sure you have a decent modern GPS (Garmin 430W/530W,480,650,750, Avidyne 440,540) and good number 2 NavCom. A basic autopilot is a plus when training or flying in actual.

     
  15. Bill Jennings

    Bill Jennings Final Approach

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    It was fun, except for maybe NDB approaches. Although it was a good feeling when I finally mastered them.
     
  16. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    HA! That's what I am flying right now.
     
  17. labbadabba

    labbadabba Cleared for Takeoff

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    I don't hate flying without an AP. But I do hate flying without a heading bug.
     
  18. mtuomi

    mtuomi Pattern Altitude

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    Nothing wrong with IR training in a 150.
     
  19. airheadpenguin

    airheadpenguin Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Why is the GPS recommended? Its handy for sure but in no way necessary and will put you into a place where you need a more advanced airplane if you're renting.

    The transition from 2xVOR to GPS + VOR is much easier than going back to dual VOR and paper charts.
     
  20. CC268

    CC268 Cleared for Takeoff

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    That is exactly what I have in my Cherokee and that is what I plan to do my rating in :p
     
  21. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Nobody mentioned making sure the airplane has an operable ADF for "fun"! Hehehe.

    (I never minded ADF approaches. But some think they're of the devil. Ha.)
     
  22. BigBadLou

    BigBadLou En-Route

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    I had the exact same feeling while training. A heading bug would have made things oh so much easier for my brain during the six-pack scan.
     
  23. wayne

    wayne Pre-takeoff checklist

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    It's a blast. It's like playing video games, but with full 3-D motion. Unusual attitude recovery while under the hood is great fun; well maybe not if you have motion sensitivity.

    Shooting an ILS with the weather reported as OVC001. That will get your attention. :D

    I always find it fun breaking out of the clouds and finding the runway in front of me.
     
  24. SbestCFII

    SbestCFII Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I think it's fun, and training IR students in actual is fun too.
     
  25. Fearless Tower

    Fearless Tower Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Only fun if IFR means I Follow Roads/Railroads...
     
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  26. Fearless Tower

    Fearless Tower Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Most fun IFR platform for me is definitely the Beech 18.

    Super stable. Puts a smile on my face every time.

    Not exactly cheap though...
     
  27. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    The book numbers for Warriors don't look very good for IFR if there is any terrain around. You can't climb faster than 500 FPM above 5000, according to the book.

    IRL, if you load lightly, it's much better. BUT you have to fly a lot slower than book Vy. I find 70 knots works nicely solo in a Warrior, up to 8000.

    Though I operate out of sea level airports, it's rare to find MEAs below 5000. If I want to go any distance, even higher.

    I find an Archer a lot easier to deal with. Though I spend most of my time in various Cessnas (my favorite is a 177RG, 'cause it's priced cheap and it's FAST compared to other trainers, making it the lowest per-mile cost I have access to).