EASA license and training in US confusion

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by RocktheWings, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. RocktheWings

    RocktheWings Filing Flight Plan

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    So I just became an instructor and am already getting curveballs thrown at me that I’ve never considered.

    Right now there’s a reservation from someone from the UK who wants to get his “complex endorsement”. Assuming he is from the UK and flying there, through my limited research I don’t think they require an actual endorsement there. I assume there is no harm in training him and logging it as such, but should I be writing out an endorsement at the end?

    It also seems that in order to actually fly in the US his EASA license would need to be converted over to the FAA equivalent. So I assume this means no solo flight or actually using the plane after the training is done.

    Finally, I’m unclear if I’ll need to verify his citizenship or do the alien flight student program for this guy. I know there are exemptions for flight reviews and such, but don’t know if that falls in that category.

    Any guidance would be much appreciated.
     
  2. mcmanigle

    mcmanigle Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I'm sure real-life CFIs will be along with actual guidance soon, but in the meantime I'll say: don't discount the possibility that this is a UK citizen who just happened to be here long enough to get an FAA pilot certificate and just wants a normal complex endorsement. Whether visiting or living here and took it up as a hobby, or is trying to collect some experience before going back and transitioning to the UK equivalent, my understanding is that it's not unusual for foreigners to just do FAA training de novo for one reason or another.
     
  3. RocktheWings

    RocktheWings Filing Flight Plan

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    I wish that were the case. The reservation says EASA PPL holder so I don’t think there’s any FAA license to speak of. I’ll hopefully know more tomorrow, but just trying to gather as much info prior so I can come prepared. Especially if the guy has to jump through hoops for the non citizenship.
     
  4. Spring Ford

    Spring Ford Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Might be worth asking on pprune.

    e.g.
    https://www.pprune.org/private-flying-63/

    There are a lot of N reg aircraft in the UK.

    There seems to be a way to get an FAA licence from an EASA one.
    Google - pprune.org faa license piggyback
     
  5. SkyDog58

    SkyDog58 Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    Canis Non Grata
    He just wants the complex endorsement and not a US pilot certificate conversion? Isn’t an endorsement an endorsement on a pilot certificate? If so, if he doesn’t have a FAA certificate, there is nothing to add the endorsement to. The rules of Part 61 in regards to endorsements would therefore not apply. No?

    So any training would most likely be treated as primary training and require the appropriate log book entries. He would also need all of the usual foreign student documentation.
     
  6. jonvcaples

    jonvcaples Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Sasquatch
    Have you checked with the FSDO? Try the duty Operations Inspector who is easiest to find by calling the main number then have the operator transfer you. (There used to have a choice on the voice tree but it seldom worked.)

    If you are a member of AOPA, they are good with these types of off the wall questions.

    Good luck and please let us know what the answer turns out to be.
     
  7. RocktheWings

    RocktheWings Filing Flight Plan

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    Quick update for those interested. I read through some more materials and found a nice AOPA guide for the TSA flight training stuff.

    https://www.aopa.org/advocacy/pilot...n-flight-training-citizenship-validation-rule

    The below seems pretty cut and dry for this student's situation considering a complex checkout is part of 61.31:

    "An alien is NOT required to participate in the AFSP and undergo a security threat assessment if:
    • He/she is seeking recurrent training, such as a flight review, instrument proficiency check, or flight training listed under 14 CFR 61.31"
    For the actual written endorsement, I can't see anything that would preclude me from actually writing it out in the logbook. The reg language just states in order to act as PIC of a complex aircraft this endorsement is needed. I don't think there would be any requirement to have a prior FAA certificate considering I could theoretically endorse a student with just a few hours to have the endorsement. They just wouldn't be able to act as PIC (or fly at all for that matter) without having the appropriate FAA equivalent certificate.
     
  8. jonvcaples

    jonvcaples Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Just hung up after talking to AOPA. Basically, you could give this pilot dual and make endorsements in their logbook. But they could not then fly solo. Reasoning is as follows:

    1-Pilot has only an EASA private

    2-FAA does not recognize or accept EASA licenses at any level. (Hmm guess the EASA medical would likewise not be recognized.) To exercise airman privileges she or he would have to complete the process for obtaining an FAA license.

    3-As far as FAA is concerned this person does not have a license or even eligible to solo.

    4-Any training (and subsequent endorsement or logbook entries) would probably not be recognized by EASA because the FAA CFI is not accepted or recognized by EASA.

    While working at UAL way before 9/11 there was lots of opportunities to work for vendors that provided training for foreign pilots. All of them held FAA licenses or, as part of their training, went through the process to obtain one.
     
  9. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    It is not. The instructor didn't get anywhere near my certificate. It goes the "PILOT LOGBOOK" by regulation.

    I agree with Jon. Unless he's going to fly on a US certificate (whether he get it "on the basis of a foreign one" or by taking the tests here), the endorsement is kind of useless.