CO detector

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by Lawson Laslo, Oct 8, 2019.

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  1. Lawson Laslo

    Lawson Laslo Pre-takeoff checklist

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    can you just cut out the small orange circle on the asa carbon monoxide detector to put in the panel? Instead of having a big white sticker in the cockpit
    upload_2019-10-8_20-47-25.png
     
  2. mwagg737

    mwagg737 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Just throw that garbage away and get in electronic one. There's a member on Mooneyspace that passed out due to CO poisoning and the orange dot still showing orange.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
     
  3. Lawson Laslo

    Lawson Laslo Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Ok
    Any fairly inexpensive ones you would recommend or can you just use a generic one like this
    upload_2019-10-8_21-12-4.jpeg
     
  4. Huckster79

    Huckster79 Line Up and Wait

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    Yup Walmart aviation, $14.99...
     
  5. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    If you want to be precise? Get a box that has a ppm gauge. I've had Aeromedix detectors for many years and I went back to the dots. Simple, cheap, effective, and I never need to calibrate or replace parts.
     
  6. SoCal RV Flyer

    SoCal RV Flyer En-Route

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    Inspect your exhaust system often...
     
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  7. chemgeek

    chemgeek Cleared for Takeoff

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    And these are next to useless. We won't use them in the chem lab because you would likely die before you notice they turn dark. They also have a poor useful life. A $20 residential/commercial solid state CO detector with a digital readout will be more effective and informative. I think I found a nice Kidde unit. Good for 10 years.
     
  8. 1RTK1

    1RTK1 Cleared for Takeoff

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    I use a key chain model that gives total exposure, dose, cumulative etc. Wasn’t that costly, but it lets me know when I hit max exposure and it is usually during taxi. I don’t always turn it on though it is nice to check now and again.
     
  9. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    With the dot type you are relying on your scan picking up the disappearance of color. Not exactly an attention getter. The electronic detectors will beep and actually alert you to the presence of the poison .
     
  10. Unit74

    Unit74 Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Look up the Sensorcon CO detector. I use one every flight and it is really the way to go. Shows PPm and has visual and audible alerts. It is about the size of new style garage door opener.
     
  11. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    [​IMG]
    had to fill the hole where the vacuum gauge came out.
     
  12. NealRomeoGolf

    NealRomeoGolf Cleared for Takeoff

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    How heavy is that?
     
  13. Gerhardt

    Gerhardt En-Route

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    slightly lighter than air.
     
  14. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    About a henway.
     
  15. david.h

    david.h Pre-takeoff checklist

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    What's a henway?













    :)
     
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  16. Zeldman

    Zeldman Touchdown! Greaser!

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    upload_2019-10-9_13-42-18.jpeg
     
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  17. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    A few ounces. Don't really remember. That picture is actually larger than life size.

    looked it up. 3.5 ounces. Full specs listed below:

    • Designed for Part 23 aircraft and Part 27 and 29 helicopters.
    • Dimensions: 3.35 in. L x 2.25 in. W x 1.50 in. H.
    • Weight 3.5 oz.
    • Input Power 14/28 VDC.
    • Internal fan for optimum sensing.
    • Shielded to prevent EMI (Electro-Magnetic Interference) with aircraft systems.
    • Audible alarm with varying pitch at 85 dB.
    • LED Red and Amber CO Alert lights. LED Green nominal indication light.
    • Temperature ranges 0 °F to 110 °F.
    • Built-in Temperature compensating circuit.
     
  18. Unit74

    Unit74 Ejection Handle Pulled

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    At sea level, that’s 14.7 psi....
     
  19. wrbix

    wrbix Pattern Altitude

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    The folks who make and market aviation specific (read: expensive) CO monitors make a point that home units aren’t tested at altitude. Don’t know what to make of that....means they aren’t reliable at homes in Denver????
     
  20. GeorgeC

    GeorgeC En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Be careful with those, their detection threshold is set pretty high. See this thread:
    https://www.pilotsofamerica.com/community/threads/carbon-monoxide-detector.91150/#post-2038931
     
  21. iflyatiger

    iflyatiger Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Home units sold in the USA are made to alarm at a higher ppm and with a longer exposure to that higher ppm.. For instance 50ppm within 60-90 minutes or 100ppm within 10-40 minutes. They where forced to build that way to avoid the excessive false alarms and the resulting pd fd responses. This level of alarm is not the best for use in an airplane where any co effects can cause big problems..

    That is why the aviation units alarm immediately at as little as 5 ppm.. it will alarm in as little co that is produced by a hairline crack (almost invisible to the eye) in your exhaust system.

    Before buying the sensorcon inspector are sure that the very low alarm sound is acceptable to you.. it is very quiet.

    Check out “CO Experts” for the real good ones.
     
  22. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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  23. weilke

    weilke Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    The home detector is set to keep you from dying in your sleep. This is from the Kidde site:


    Carbon Monoxide Level Alarm Response Time
    40 PPM 10 hours
    50 PPM 8 hours
    70 PPM 1 to 4 hours
    150 PPM 10 to 50 minutes
    400 PPM 4 to 15 minutes



    The portable units are mostly set for occupational exposures and have more of an instant response. This is for the Aeromedix keychain unit:

    • CO level between 50 PPM and 124 PPM: Alarm beeper/LED/Vibrator pulse once every 20 seconds.
    • CO level between 125 PPM and 399 PPM: Alarm beeper/LED/Vibrator pulse once every 10 seconds.
    • CO level exposure at or above 400 PPM: Alarm beeper/LED/Vibrator pulse once every 5 seconds.
    This for a 3M BW Clip detector. That's what you'll find on the maintenance guy who has to enter the boiler plant:

    This monitor has default alarm setpoints at 35 ppm and 200 ppm, with an alarm setpoint range of 5 ppm to 200 ppm.






    35 is the threshold for 'you dont want to work here for the next 8hrs'.

    200 is the 'gtf out of here NOW' level.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019