Cheapest Twin on EBay Down

flyingpreacher

Pre-takeoff checklist
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flyingpreacher

This just happened a couple of hours ago. The Rebuild Rescue YouTube channel has been refurbishing the cheapest twin engine available on EBay. According to their social media, they put the new props on yesterday. It went down today with one reported fatality.

More details will be added as they become available.

Flight track: https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N887CC/history/20240201/1849Z/KMQS/KMQS
 

This just happened a couple of hours ago. The Rebuild Rescue YouTube channel has been refurbishing the cheapest twin engine available on EBay. According to their social media, they put the new props on yesterday. It went down today with one reported fatality.

More details will be added as they become available.

Flight track: https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N887CC/history/20240201/1849Z/KMQS/KMQS
Just watched a quick clip from the rebuild rescue on this plane.
I wonder what went wrong...
 
Based on the ADSB data, I’m guessing full power wasn’t being made. No idea why that would be since it seems to have made a 500NM xc about 45 days ago.
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Ugh. I corresponded with him this summer about a Comanche I found gathering dust at a local strip. Seems like a nice enough guy.
 
Someone on the Beech board has a friend that was operating a tug on the airport. Said one engine started backfiring on climbout, aircraft got slow, dropped a wing and spun in. Sounds like vmc roll.

MQS is one of my t&g circuit airports. Was heading out to fly today but the phone rang and I got waylaid. Would have been up there about that time.

RIP.
 
Someone on the Beech board has a friend that was operating a tug on the airport. Said one engine started backfiring on climbout, aircraft got slow, dropped a wing and spun in. Sounds like vmc roll.

MQS is one of my t&g circuit airports. Was heading out to fly today but the phone rang and I got waylaid. Would have been up there about that time.

RIP.
Ugh. I used to follow him on YT, but kinda got tired of the schtick. It'll be interesting to see who was on board, and who was flying. Last I heard, he was a long term student pilot, although he was usually flying in the videos with a qualified person in the right seat. They refurbed and flew stuff I would've said was too far gone. Too bad.
 
Sad RIP. Losino an engine on climb out is never a good thing in a twin.
 
Looks like that article updated and it says that it was Sam who passed in the accident (and was the only person on board). He seemed like a really great guy from watching the channel. From talk in various videos, IIRC he owned or used to own another Grumman Cougar, so certainly was very familiar with the type, but losing an engine in a light twin on takeoff at low altitude rarely has a good ending. Very sad, thinking of all his family and friends.
 
Hi! Long time listener, first time caller.

Looks like it taxied to the run-up area on Jan 26th but it didn't fly. Is that when they tried the new props?

I can't post links and such, but I am surprised to see (watching the tv coverage) that there was no post-crash fire. Allegedly the plane had been fully fueled. Also, the tail is folded over the fuselage, not to the side, so it would seem it hit the ground with no rotation on the yaw axis.

Edited to correct my confusion.
 
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I really stopped watching them when they did the gear rigging on the twin Cessna completely wrong.

When I saw that, I knew it was only a matter of time before something went bad on a project of theirs.


Sad to see it actually happen. RIP.
 
The plane's first flight 3 weeks ago.


He had recently made a deal to sell it.
 
Is this the Garage Monkeys of aviation?
 
I didn't get the impression they were skimping on anything safety related on any of their work. An A&P IA had to sign off on anything being done, but I guess we'll see what the NTSB says...
 
Never liked the show. What I saw early on, they way they rushed to start those engines on the 401 and some of the questionable judgement displayed, all of it in the name of views, turned me off on the whole operation. Judging by the views on the initial episodes compared with the later ones, I wasn't the only one.

This seemingly lack of good judgement extended to the Cougar. Sits for who knows how long in MI, get some repairs done and then embark on a 500 mile flight straight to PA. I didn't see even a few laps in the pattern over there to do some sort of a check-out before embarking on such a trip.

Once it arrived in PA, the same thing - it seems they did taxi to the run-up area a few days prior, but no other check-out flights. Rumors from the locals seem to indicate the plane was sold. Someone else mentioned they had filled up the plane with 80 gallons of fuel. That doesn't sound (to me) like a plane going for a few laps around the pattern. More like a delivery to the buyer. But that's me speculating.
I would've kept it light and flown it around the block for an hour or so before embarking on any of those long journeys. Make sure things are A-OK and no parts want to come out of the exhausts.

It's these little things that make me question the decision-making process in that operation.
 
This seemingly lack of good judgement extended to the Cougar. Sits for who knows how long in MI, get some repairs done and then embark on a 500 mile flight straight to PA. I didn't see even a few laps in the pattern over there to do some sort of a check-out before embarking on such a trip.
MIght actually watch the video. Test flying was done, with no apparent squawks before flying the a/c home the next day. As to sitting, it had only been there for a little under two years.
 
I sit corrected.
Looks like there are some ADS-B hits that resemble a lap or two in the pattern (but not more) the day of the flight to PA. Nothing else the day prior or earlier. Those hits are active all the way down to runway level, so ADS-B coverage should be decent. Not sure why it looks so sketchy. Creative editing can make a day's flights seem to be stretched over a week, so what would you believe? ADS-B data or a video storyline?

The point still stands, though - doesn't look like there were any prior flights in PA after arriving there. This was the first flight and it was reportedly fully fueled, with the speculation that it was being flown to its new owner.

Also, sitting for two years is not a good thing in my book.
 
There were a couple things that made me uncomfortable. 4 guys working on one engine seemingly without much QC coordination. Lot of back and forth about the mags, forgetting to connect the primary coil wire to the points, initially installing mags in the wrong position, putting something on the case snug with the intention of torqueing later.

Did not promote warm fuzzy feelings.

No idea if it had any bearing on anything, but with knowledge of the outcome they could be potential links in the accident chain.
 
Is this the Garage Monkeys of aviation?
That show made me want to poke myself in the eye with a fork. Hacking up a car, installing some aftermarket parts (poorly), a quick paint job, and calling it a “custom.”
 
Oh man that's so rough from several dimensions
 
Any airplane you fly, certainly light singles and twins you need to be spring loaded to deal with engine failure. In fact just assume it is going to happen any minute, every minute of your flight and know what you are going to do so it is muscle memory.

If you stall it or, roll it you will likely not make it.
 
I didn't see even a few laps in the pattern over there to do some sort of a check-out before embarking on such a trip.
Pattern work in a light twin is by far the most dangerous flight regime. I would absolutely NOT recommend doing pattern work in an aircraft that is being prepared to be ferried. Short hops? Sure, but being low on energy in a light twin is a bad idea. Let's go easy on the rampant **** flinging.

I met Sam and his wife at OSH a couple years ago, and am deeply saddened by the news. He was a very genuine person, and by all accounts a very good pilot. This is not news I ever expected to see.
 
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Monetization of social media may have not killed more people than cancer, but it sure is giving it a run for its money.
I get the sentiment but let's not lose our heads. Cancer kills more than half a million people a year in the USA. I'll scowl at foolish innertube monetization with the rest of you, but it isn't a pimple on the flea on the ass of cancer.
 
Pattern work in a light twin is by far the most dangerous flight regime. I would absolutely NOT recommend doing pattern work in an aircraft that is being prepared to be ferried. Short hops? Sure, but being low on energy in a light twin is a bad idea. Let's go easy on the rampant **** flinging.
No need to throw such words out there, doesn't make it any more acceptable if use *****s instead.
A few laps in the pattern doesn't mean doing touch and go landings, with changing airspeeds and altitudes that put you in a low energy state. (Which, by the way, if you look closely at the ADS-B track, is what it appears they did before departing for PA).
Let me rephrase that for you - I saw no sign of a risk-mitigation post-maintenance flight, of a duration long enough to have a chance of uncovering any potential engine or airframe issues (bolts not fully torqued, loosening up after one hour but not after a lap or two in the pattern, and so on), at a safe altitude and close enough to the airfield that a safe return could be attempted in case a major malfunction developed, before deciding to embark on a 500-mile cross-country flight.
I've seen people spend an hour or two circling above the field, within gliding range, after engine work. That's my safety-minded expectation.

I have no doubt Sam was a great human being (I mean it). Sadly, none of us are infallible. I have seen other nice guys succumb to get-there-itis and expectation bias.
FYI, Vmc on a GA-7 is below stall speed.
That explains why it didn't look like a spin but more like a straight impact.
 
During a round of hangar flying today, someone who knows a few people at MQS mentioned the latest rumor/speculation is that a fuel selector valve was in the OFF position. This is definitely a third hand piece of information, we'll see what they say about it in the preliminary report.
 
During a round of hangar flying today, someone who knows a few people at MQS mentioned the latest rumor/speculation is that a fuel selector valve was in the OFF position. This is definitely a third hand piece of information, we'll see what they say about it in the preliminary report.
Would it run long enough on the fuel in the line to make it to takeoff if the selector was off? On mine I can't even get it started with it off. More likely, he turned it off as part of the shutdown feather sequence if one engine went toes up. But I have heard of props that seemed fine on ground ops but wouldn't feather in flight. That would be a bad day for sure.
 
In the semenhole they can stay lit until climbout if people forget to bring them back to on (or inadvertently stop in the OFF detent on their way to the ON detent, like in the case of said pa44, after a crossfeed check on the ground immediately prior to takeoff). That's what happened to the kiddos at FIT in 2010.
 
Would it run long enough on the fuel in the line to make it to takeoff if the selector was off? On mine I can't even get it started with it off. More likely, he turned it off as part of the shutdown feather sequence if one engine went toes up. But I have heard of props that seemed fine on ground ops but wouldn't feather in flight. That would be a bad day for sure.
I've been told O-320s in Cherokees will make it pretty far into the takeoff process with the fuel valve set to OFF.
 
GA-7 will make it to about 100 feet if the fuel is turned off when the take off roll is started.

Don't ask.
 
In the semenhole they can stay lit until climbout if people forget to bring them back to on (or inadvertently stop in the OFF detent on their way to the ON detent, like in the case of said pa44, after a crossfeed check on the ground immediately prior to takeoff). That's what happened to the kiddos at FIT in 2010.
My POH checklist says to put fuel in crossfeed prior to takeoff to check flow and exercise the valves. But I moved that task to my after landing checklist on the taxi in to specifically avoid this possibility.
 
Preliminary is out and it is ugly for everyone involved.
 
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