Want To Buy CFI in Tucson, AZ

Discussion in 'The Classifieds' started by Josh Jackson, Jul 31, 2019.

?

What beginner plane would you buy?

  1. Cessna 150

    28.6%
  2. Piper Tomahawk

    28.6%
  3. Other

    42.9%
  1. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I am looking for a CFI in Tucson, AZ that can stay with me through my PPL certification.

    I do not currently have my own airplane, though I am interested in purchasing a Piper Tomahawk or Cessna C150.

    I would like to find a CFI that has a plane, though I am not against renting for the right Instructor price.

    I am trying to do my PPL through Part 61 and possibly using Sporty's for ground school online.

    I am military and I do use X Plane 11 at home with the Airfoils Cessna 172, but I am extremely novice.

    Please let me know if you all know anyone out there, as I would like to complete my PPL by the end of the year, to use my GI Bill to pay for more advanced ratings for a career path.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Kenny Phillips

    Kenny Phillips Pattern Altitude

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    On think I'll ask: do you have your FAA medical yet? If you want to go "career", you should make sure that you qualify for a first class medical.
    And if you are relatively small, a 150 would be the ticket; you pretty much cannot lose money on it. Finding one suitable for IFR training will be a little difficult, but they do exist. The performance "hot and high", conditions which do exist in Tucson for a decent part of the year, is disappointing; a 152 has a few more ponies.
     
  3. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I was Class II Medical while active duty, I am National Guard now with a Class III and still in essentially the same ,if not better health. I do not believe a Class I will be difficult to receive, but thank you for reminding me of that requirement, as I was only thinking of a Class III.

    I am 5' 8" on a good day, I will look into the 152 though thank you!

    I was always told that Tucson is a great place to learn to fly with the weather conditions, is this untrue or marginally untrue? I am a meteorological technician in the Air Force and have vast Aviation Weather training, but never with a manned aircraft as small as the Cessna/Piper aircraft. Most of my weather experience has been fighters and UAVs.
     
  4. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    Josh did you come from DM as active duty? If so, have you ever heard the initials TM from the tower?

    That's me.

    What flight schools have you checked already?
     
  5. asicer

    asicer En-Route

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    I voted for the Tomahawk. I *think* it's cheaper to acquire so you won't lose much when it's time to move on.
     
  6. Caramon13

    Caramon13 Pattern Altitude

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    Voted other. A 152 or even older 172 would be a better plane to buy and use after training imo...never flown a Tramahawk, but they seem hard to find.

    I bought a Cherokee 180, 1965 model for my flight training, was a great plane.
     
  7. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    Tim, awesome to hear you are local! I came from Virginia as Active Duty, currently assigned to the Reaper unit on DM though as Air National Guard. I have never heard TM but are you ATC on DM? I need a lot of radio practice haha.

    That is why I am leaning toward the Tomahawk. They are easy to find under 20k and the resale sticks with them from what I have researched so far.

    I was thinking I could use it to hop around Southern Arizona and gain some hours as a CFI down the road in it as it seems to be a great trainer plane.

    I have been looking around at the 152s, the 172s are out of my price range right now and I dont want to get in over my head on an airplane. I am not too concerned about the range or seating in the aircraft after training, as I am planning to continue my training down the airliner path after my PPL.

    I would still fly the plane just to get up in the sky for leisure and sell it sometime down the road.

    Do you feel owning the Cherokee for training was worth it in the end?
     
  8. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    Yes I work in DM tower and with the exception of three deployments and two assignments, I have been since 1992. I bought a Cherokee to finish my training after starting in a 152 in the 80's. I still have it and plan on having it for a long time. I keep it at Handy Hangars next to Million Air on KTUS.
     
  9. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    Thats pretty awesome, I almost did ATC in the Navy, but settled on Weather instead. I have always had an interest in the controller side of aviation.

    ah yeah, Million Air right off Valencia right? Well if you ever want a flight companion I know a guy that would love to tag a long!

    The Cherokee looks like a good plane, it might be a little above my price range at this point, but I may be able to convince the wife in the long term that it would be worth it.

    I am trying to pay cash for the plane though.
     
  10. schmookeeg

    schmookeeg Cleared for Takeoff

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    152 over 150? Curious why, my thoughts lean the opposite. :)

    I voted 'other', because I agree that a 172 is the better choice here. Especially in Tucson.
     
  11. jsstevens

    jsstevens En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Piper Tomahawk has a useful load of 542 lbs. With 30 gallons of gas, that drops to 242. Unless you & your flight instructor combined are 242 lbs or less, this is not going work for you.
     
  12. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    You're probably going to be hard pressed to find a CFI who will instruct in their own plane. But I know a couple who might instruct in your plane. The above post makes a LOT of sense so if you go that route, consider the useful load.
     
  13. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    What would make the 172 a better choice in Tucson? I am not an expert by any means on these planes. Is it the power? and if so, why do I need to be concerned with that in Tucson specifically? winds? heat? just trying to figure out all the details before I make a very bad decision on an airplane.

    my leaning toward a 150 is price specific, as I am trying to pay cash for the plane and have enough to also pay for my PPL.

    With the Tomahawk fuel burn of 6.5gph, wouldn't half tanks (16 gallons) be okay for flight lessons? I'm 180, so that would allow for a 250lb instructor and 2 hours of flight time with a half hour of fuel to play with. Assuming my instructor were 250lb. If he/she were 200lb wouldnt that allow me at least 25 gallons of fuel?

    I hadn't thought the useful load would have been an issue, but thank you for bringing it to my attention!! I really appreciate it.
     
  14. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I know its a stretch for a CFI instructing in their own plane, that is a lot of liability and cost. Would you be able to get me into contact with the CFIs you know? I would like to at least start the process of finding an instructor that I am comfortable with. If I do use my own plane or have to rent one, I definitely want to make sure I am making the right decision on my CFI.

    Thank you!
     
  15. jsstevens

    jsstevens En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Thats probably OK for your private training. But for your long cross country (dual) you'll probably have to stop for fuel. And you are one of the few who are actually an FAA standard person (180 lbs) so you are in a better position than most. If you want to travel with the plane later, it'll be more of a limitation (assuming you want to take somebody and luggage along).
     
  16. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    Actually both are members of this forum, I'll let them contact you. One is Tucson, the other in Casa Grande.
     
  17. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    Yeah, with the duals though you are only required to travel 50nm, straight-line, correct? so even though not ideal, it is still doable? I would love to have a 172, but they are quite a step up in price compared to the Tomahawk and 150 (which has an even lower useful load than the Tomahawk).

    I'm 180lbs and still losing weight haha. I'm chunky, was 200lbs in January. So if I went with a Tomahawk, would that not be motivation to stay in shape??? But I do not believe I would be looking to travel in the Tomahawk. It would be for local flights only, maybe down to Sierra Vista (my daughter lives there) or up to Phoenix at most.

    You have been a huge help!
     
  18. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    Oh awesome! Thank you. I would hope the Tucson one is interested! But Casa Grande isn't out of the question for a good instructor.
     
  19. jsstevens

    jsstevens En-Route PoA Supporter

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    No. Anything over 50nm straight line distance is considered cross country, but you have to do a: 1 solo cross country flight of at least 150nm total distance with full stop landings at 3 points and one segment of at least 50nm between T/O and landings; and I've never heard of an instructor turning somebody loose on one of those without having flown it dual first. Not impossible, nor even particularly horrible, but something to consider. If you also do your Instrument Rating in the same plane you have to do a 250nm with 3 different approach types at three different airports. And instrument approaches require a good bit more flying around to get to the airport (generally) and flying a missed approach as well as more stringent reserves (45 minutes). You didn't say whether IR is in your plans, but if it is, buy an airplane that can do both now.

    Good on you for losing weight! My battle continues...

    In short, the Cherokee's (PA-28) 140 & 150 are much more capable aircraft for not a lot more money and they are plentiful.
     
  20. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I will take a look at those! thank you! I will be doing only my PPL in this aircraft and using my GI Bill to cover all costs of my other certifications, so I will be using the planes provided by those schools I believe.

    I'd imagine in the long run I would prefer an aircraft that is fully capable of IR from purchase, without having to put even more money into it.

    Great advice!
     
  21. asicer

    asicer En-Route

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    What are Beech Skipper or Musketeer prices like these days?
     
  22. Salty

    Salty En-Route PoA Supporter

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    An hour of flying (with a healthy reserve) is probably only 20 gallons in that thing. That leaves 422 pounds for student and instructor.

    You’re math doesn’t add up at all actually. 542 - (30x6) = 362
     
  23. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 En-Route

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    Tomahawks are fine aircraft except that they have life limited parts that will eventually ground them... and there’s nothing wrong with partial fuel as long as you are careful and learn to manage it wisely. I’m instructing part-time in a 150 with students in Dallas right now. It’s easier with a 150# instructor.
     
  24. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 En-Route

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    If you lean the engine out if you should only burn 6 to 7 gallons per hour max. 20 gallons should let you fly 2 hours with an ok reserve, although in the Tomahawk you have to remember to switch tanks.
     
  25. jsstevens

    jsstevens En-Route PoA Supporter

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    You’re right. Must’ve fat fingered the calculator. At any rate it wouldn’t work for me. But I don’t weigh 180.
     
  26. retpd2001

    retpd2001 Line Up and Wait

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    Check Kelly at Kelly's Aviation at Ryan, she is a great instructor but last I heard she was scaling back. She is worth the phone call, she taught my son to fly fixed wings, mention my name. Hope that helps.
     
  27. schmookeeg

    schmookeeg Cleared for Takeoff

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    Generally, and not specific to Tucson, a far wider range of mission scope with the added horsepower and useful load. It's fine to find a CFI who fits within the loading envelope of a 150/152. Does the DPE? Does your next CFI when this one gets a job with the airlines?

    172s, particularly 1970s/1980s vintage ones are very easy to sell, since they're the Corolla of the skies. :) I prefer the O-300 ones, but they're long in the tooth these days and a bit harder to sell.

    Particular to Tucson, I'd be unhappy in a 150 on a high density altitude day. We hated ours in the inland SoCal summer, and they didn't rent very well as a result (only about 60% of the hours the 172s flew in summer -- comparable hours in winter -- ie, lots of scrubbed training flights) You may be limited (by comfort, by CFI comfort, or by mission comfort) to certain times of day only, sort of a nuisance when you're gung ho in training.

    Only my opinion. If there's a hard budget number that's trying to be hit, then I'd still take a cherokee over a 150 for similar money, as someone above said.
     
  28. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I haven't looked into them! But I will be sure to check them out. The Cherokee does seem to be a better buy at this point for longevity.

    I would imagine! Thank you for the advice!

    That does make a lot of sense. Comfort is probably key when it comes to being trapped in the air for extended periods. I think you are right about the Cherokee though. It is a little more expensive but a whole lot more versatile.
     
  29. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    I sent her an email! Thank you Glenn!
     
  30. Timbeck2

    Timbeck2 Final Approach

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    check your pm's Josh. I may have a plane for you.

    Already in a hangar next to me

    and an instructor
     
  31. Josh Jackson

    Josh Jackson Pre-Flight

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    Got it! Replied.