Cessna 210 T main wheel

Discussion in 'Maintenance Bay' started by Avi Lavon, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. Avi Lavon

    Avi Lavon Filing Flight Plan

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    Hi ,
    looking for the torque of the wheel nut.
    Thank you all.
    Avi
     
  2. alfadog

    alfadog En-Route

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    What I do is Google the aircraft and "service manual".
     
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  3. Avi Lavon

    Avi Lavon Filing Flight Plan

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    Tnx. tried , couldn't find it.
     
  4. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    Are you talking about the bolts through the wheel halves? Clevelands are 150 lb-in and most MaCauleys are 90-100 lb-in.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
  5. Avi Lavon

    Avi Lavon Filing Flight Plan

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    No. the big Nut holds the all wheel (the one with the safety pin).
     
  6. alfadog

    alfadog En-Route

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    Your A&P should know how to locate that information.
     
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  7. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    I've never seen a torque value for an axle nut. Tighten until you begin to recognize bearing drag when rotating the tire. Back the nut off to the nearest alignment for the cotter pin hole and pin it.
     
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  8. Bell206

    Bell206 Line Up and Wait

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
  9. Avi Lavon

    Avi Lavon Filing Flight Plan

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    Tnx , helpful.
     
  10. Avi Lavon

    Avi Lavon Filing Flight Plan

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  11. jesse

    jesse Administrator Management Council Member

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    Hint..we are talking like finger tight..definitely not something you’d throw a torque wrench on..or any level of torque that requires the tool.

    Grab the wheel and yank it, if there is slop that’s too loose. You want it just tight enough that there is no slop, and not really any much more. Too tight is bad. The bearings will fail and your wheel may lock up at the most undesirable time.

    Did you repack the bearings with grease? If you haven’t, do that, and any other time you take it apart.

    Watch any video on YouTube that involves repacking trailer bearings. Same thing...this is a job that is much easier learned by “seeing” versus “reading”.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2018
  12. Spring Ford

    Spring Ford Pre-Flight

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    Viewed from the vantage point of ten or so messages so far on the thread - this is a deeply impressive response.
     
  13. Dan Thomas

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    Nope. Cleveland also has a 90-in-lb spec. Generally, 1/4" bolts get 90 and 5/16" get 150, but there are also separate numbers for magnesium wheels as well. Best to look up the online Cleveland maintenance manual for the torques specific to any particular wheel. You can do a lot of damage using the wrong numbers. Expensive damage.

    Tables start on Page A8 (Appendix A) of AWBCMM0001 (0.92 MB) at http://www.parker.com/portal/site/P...cat=ac504ff7b0eca410VgnVCM10000014a71dacRCRD&
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
  14. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    My numbers came right out of my Cessna service manual, which lists both Clevelands and Macs.
     
  15. Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas En-Route

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    More than finger tight. The Cleveland manual has this to say:

    (g) Torque axle nut using value specified in aircraft manual or the following:
    1 Rotate the wheel/tire while tightening axle nut to 150 to 200 inch-pounds (16.9 to
    22.6 N•m) to seat the bearing.
    2 Back off axle nut to zero torque.
    3 Tighten axle nut to 30-40 inch-pounds (3.4 to 4.5 N•m) while rotating wheel/tire.
    4 Rotate axle nut (clockwise or counterclockwise) to nearest slot and cotter pin hole,
    and insert cotter pin. Bend ends of cotter pin around axle nut. Note: Wheel must
    rotate freely without perceptible play

    Page 333 of AWBCMM0001 (0.92 MB) at http://www.parker.com/portal/site/P...&l1catname=Literature+and+Reference+Materials


    The reason for a bit of preload is that the tapered beaings will push outward slightly when the aircraft's weight comes on them, and some slop will develop. If you don't have fairly firm contact between the rollers and cup, they can slide instead of roll, and you get instant wear.
     
  16. Stewartb

    Stewartb Final Approach

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    Cut and pasted from my Cessna Service Manual.
     
  17. Dan Thomas

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    And they would be specific to the wheel numbers used on your Cessna. Different Cessnas and other manufacturers use different wheels in different model years and on different models.

    Aircraft maintenance tends to be a little more complicated than a lot of owners think. And a little more complicated than some mechanics think, too.
     
  18. jesse

    jesse Administrator Management Council Member

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    Reads like how I’ve always done it. By the time you “back off” to the nearest castellation you’re talking about very minimal torque.

    There is usually very little axle nut rotation left between bearing contact and too tight. Usually the difference between the ideal point and where you end up after you back it up to line up the cotter pin results in a torque that isn’t far from finger tight.