For Sale WTB Valve Lash Adjustment Tool for Lycoming O-235

Discussion in 'The Classifieds' started by Lndwarrior, May 25, 2019.

  1. Lndwarrior

    Lndwarrior Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Gary
    Got one you don't need? If so, please let me know.
     
  2. alfadog

    alfadog En-Route

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    Screwdriver and a wrench? Just did one a couple days ago but then I've owned Volkswagens.
     
  3. Lndwarrior

    Lndwarrior Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yeah I've done this but on the O-235-C1 it is a time consuming process because the slightest twisting of the screw changes the clearance. This happens as you tighten the nut.

    My O-235 has the solid lifters. Don't know if the adjustment is easier on the hydraulic lifters but I suspect that it is.

    The tool eliminates the twisting and allows you to set it much more precisely. Otherwise it's a painstaking process of doing it over and over again until the engine gods smile on you. An then you do it seven more times...

    I'm guessing there are those who do this all the time and get good at it and they probably don't need the tool.

    I have to do it on my engine about twice a year and it's frustrating as heck to get it in the .007 to .009 clearance required.

    I have to do this every 100 hours on my O-235-C1. After 3 years of this I'm ready to drop the $200 on the tool to save me time and aggravation.

    For me, maintaining my homebuilt aircraft consumes a huge amount of my time. Frankly, I'm sick of it. Anything I can do to save time and simplify the process is worth it.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2019
    GRG55 likes this.
  4. alfadog

    alfadog En-Route

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    I can understand. Personally, I have a good touch for it and it only takes a few minutes per valve. But then I have been adjusting valves since I was 14 or so though not so much in the last 30 years until I got into wrenching on old airplanes. I rough it in go/no-go .008 and .0012, then the last little bit go/no-go .009 and .011. The manual says .007 - .009 but the plaque on the engine says .010.
     
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  5. Spotter626

    Spotter626 Pre-Flight

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    yep I check my 0-235 every couple of years and see little to no change most of the time. Due to the lack of frequency I just use the screwdriver and wrench. A little practice and it's not a problem, just learn to anticipate the amount to allow for tightening the nut and you'll find it won't take long.