Thunderbirds Commander Relieved

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by mscard88, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Yeah yeah, I remember now. Thanks.
     
  2. Zeldman

    Zeldman Final Approach

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    When you get to Soldotna, be sure to go down to Homer. Visit the Salty Dawg Saloon on the spit.

    I understand where your coming from. I was very competitive when I was young(er) and full of pizz and vinegar. When I was told I could not do something, I enjoyed proving that person wrong. However, I am no longer full of vinegar so I am mellowing out a bit. I would have loved to have been a military flyer, but it wasn't in the cards. C'est la vie
     
  3. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    So you're still full of pizz though correct? o_O
     
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  4. Zeldman

    Zeldman Final Approach

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    I certainly agree with you. Not everyone can be a military pilot. I had a bone injury that kept me out. I could have re-injured that bone in combat instead of being shot through the head. Some folks can't perform under pressure. Doesn't mean they are a bad pilot, just that they do not measure up to the rigid military standards.

    I should have said anyone can fly just about any aircraft with training.

    I was recruited to be an instructor at the military pre-flight training facility in Hondo, TX. I thought it was pretty funny that I was not given a chance to be a military flyer, but was wanted to train hopeful military flyers. I declined and instead went to Alaska. I think it was called Doss Aviation.

    A friend of mine was a test pilot for Bell. He asked me if I wanted to be an instructor for the Osprey. I told him I do not know how to fly an Osprey. He said, "No one does..!!! It's not flying yet.!!" He told me I would be working with him and others developing a training syllabus. I declined because that thing looked too Buck Rogers in the 25th Century to me. I was so smart back then that I thought it would never go into service.:rolleyes: If I had any regrets in life, not working on the training syllabus and learning to fly the Osprey would be a big one.

    Washouts happen in the 135/121 world as well, even on recurrency rides. I watched a guy, 74 years old, have a bad day on a 135 recurrency ride. He did a few practice approaches, then decided to end a 50 year flying career. I think he had lost confidence in himself.

    But like I said, I agree not everyone is cut out to be a military flyer. Those that do make it are the best of those that volunteered.
     
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