Single Pilot Part 135

iamtheari

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Do any POAers have experience putting together and/or operating a single-pilot Part 135 charter operation? I'm curious how much of a headache it really is, how hard it is to get insurance, and things like that. In particular, how much red tape is really conserved in getting one of these certified compared with a standard charter operation? I get asked often enough about local charter operations that I wonder about whether I could trick someone into starting one.
 
About 2 years start to finish. The insurance will be high.

The airplane will have to go through a conformity inspection. If it’s like a lot of GA junk out there, good luck.

Depending on which FSDO you are talking about, be prepared for delay, delay, delay.
 
What does a conformity inspection entail? Equipment list vs. type certificate, or is there a different standard for part 135 that they apply?
 
I will be closely watching this thread. A friend just took delivery of a brand new Cirrus S22T and is looking to fly as much as he can. I’d be curious to see how many total hours and hours in type he would need in order to be granted single pilot part 135. Also curious about whether there are expediters/law firms that can put everything together.

Insurance isn’t an issue. You just add it to the charter hourly cost.
 
What does a conformity inspection entail? Equipment list vs. type certificate, or is there a different standard for part 135 that they apply?

As the name implies, does the aircraft conform to it's type certificate? This also goes for anything that's been installed.

Are all AD's and SB's complied with? Engine and props must be maintained by manufacturer recommendations, such as TBO. Does the aircraft have any life limit items? Are all form 337's documented? Equipment list? Weight and Balance? Does everything work? Does equipment have the necessary markings (seat belt tags, landing gear data plates, etc) Does the aircraft have a current up to date POH with manuals for any installed equipment?

And the list goes on.
 
I will be closely watching this thread. A friend just took delivery of a brand new Cirrus S22T and is looking to fly as much as he can. I’d be curious to see how many total hours and hours in type he would need in order to be granted single pilot part 135. Also curious about whether there are expediters/law firms that can put everything together.

Insurance isn’t an issue. You just add it to the charter hourly cost.

Read 14 CFR Part 119 and Part 135 for hour requirements.
 
The airplane will have to go through a conformity inspection. If it’s like a lot of GA junk out there, good luck.
Nah, just gotta find the right rubber stamp inspector. :p
 
Acquiring a Single-Pilot 135 is not a stretch by any means. Read this:
Single-Pilot 135 Requirements

The number one thing you need to do your homework on is the: "General Operations Manual (GOM)" . The GOM is a manual that will describe every detail of your operation and will be approved line by line by an FAA Inspector (ASI). Most of the operational rules are very rudimentary and are easy approved. Don't be intimidated by all the requirements there just basic questions with basic answers.

The SMS for a Single-Pilot 135 are implemented in the GOM by default. Not difficult at all.
 
Acquiring a Single-Pilot 135 is not a stretch by any means. Read this:
Single-Pilot 135 Requirements

The number one thing you need to do your homework on is the: "General Operations Manual (GOM)" . The GOM is a manual that will describe every detail of your operation and will be approved line by line by an FAA Inspector (ASI). Most of the operational rules are very rudimentary and are easy approved. Don't be intimidated by all the requirements there just basic questions with basic answers.

The SMS for a Single-Pilot 135 are implemented in the GOM by default. Not difficult at all.

A Single Pilot 135 does not require a GOM, nor does it require a Training Manual. It does require a Compliance Statement.
 
A Single Pilot 135 does not require a GOM, nor does it require a Training Manual. It does require a Compliance Statement.
I'm missing something, did I write that a Single-Pilot 135 is required by regulation to have a GOM? I stated nothing about a training manual either. Understanding the GOM is essential to operating commercially on any and all levels. No matter what the regulations require. Although, Operation Specifications (OP Specs.) are required.
 
I'm missing something, did I write that a Single-Pilot 135 is required by regulation to have a GOM? I stated nothing about a training manual either. Understanding the GOM is essential to operating commercially on any and all levels. No matter what the regulations require. Although, Operation Specifications (OP Specs.) are required.
You wrote that one Would need to do his homework on the GOM, and that it’s where single pilot 135 SMS is implemented. How would one read that such that a GOM would not be required?
 
I'm missing something, did I write that a Single-Pilot 135 is required by regulation to have a GOM?

Yes you did: The number one thing you need to do your homework on is the: "General Operations Manual (GOM)" . The GOM is a manual that will describe every detail of your operation and will be approved line by line by an FAA Inspector (ASI)

The topic is Single Pilot Part 135, and you advised to "do your homework on "General Operations Manual".
Understanding the GOM is essential to operating commercially on any and all levels.

What GOM??? According to guidance the operator writes the GOM to comply with regulations (Part 61, 91, 119 and 135) And guidance specifies that Single Pilot Part 135 does not require a GOM.

No matter what the regulations require.

It does matter what the regulations require as the operator is required to develop a compliance statement.

Although, Operation Specifications (OP Specs.) are required.

You don't say? :rolleyes:
 
Don't make a Single-Pilot 135 more so complicated. It's a commercial pilot and an aircraft maintained to commercial standards. Once approved you may advertise and fly revenue passengers and cargo.
You wrote that one Would need to do his homework on the GOM, and that it’s where single pilot 135 SMS is found. How would one read that such that a GOM would not be required?
Many pilots who start their own Single-Pilot 135 are experienced from flying commercial at a multi-Pilot operation and must study that companies GOM. It's not required but a thorough knowledge is very important. The SMS can be done without a GOM but why?
 
Many pilots who start their own Single-Pilot 135 are experienced from flying commercial at a multi-Pilot operation and must study that companies GOM. It's not required but a thorough knowledge is very important. The SMS can be done without a GOM but why?
because doing things that aren’t required is often wasted effort.
 
MauleSkinner and Doc, If you don't do a GOM, even for a Single-Pilot 135 you will be complicating the commercial operations. Each time you have a 'Base Inspection' you'll be quoting your operations from memory. That's a poor way to operate a professional business.
 
MauleSkinner and Doc, If you don't do a GOM, even for a Single-Pilot 135 you will be complicating the commercial operations. Each time you have a 'Base Inspection' you'll be quoting your operations from memory. That's a poor way to operate a professional business.
I had to quote my GOM from memory for the FAA, too…what’s the difference?
 
MauleSkinner and Doc, If you don't do a GOM, even for a Single-Pilot 135 you will be complicating the commercial operations. Each time you have a 'Base Inspection' you'll be quoting your operations from memory. That's a poor way to operate a professional business.

A GOM is not required, and never has been. If an applicant applies for a SP 135 and presents the FAA with a GOM, they will hand it back.

Why do you insist on trying to show knowledge on topics you know nothing about?
 
A GOM is not required, and never has been. If an applicant applies for a SP 135 and presents the FAA with a GOM, they will hand it back.

Why do you insist on trying to show knowledge on topics you know nothing about?
Your so funny.
 
Equipment list vs. type certificate, or is there a different standard for part 135 that they apply?
While there are various standards for aircraft conformity checks they are all basically the same. However there is a Part 135 reference for this that addresses the pertinent items.
 
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This is probably a monumentally stupid question, but here goes anyway.

If you purchase an aircraft that is already in a 135 to use in your 135, does all this paperwork for the aircraft carry over, or do you start all over?
 
This is probably a monumentally stupid question, but here goes anyway.

If you purchase an aircraft that is already in a 135 to use in your 135, does all this paperwork for the aircraft carry over, or do you start all over?

It doesn't carry over, but it does make the process easier.
 
@Doc Holliday are you a helicopter pilot by chance too?

Back to conformity - as was mentioned, does the aircraft meet the TCDS. Something as simple as velcro could be considered out of conformity.
No Velcro! ;)
 
This is me checking if the ancient faded formerly-white switch covers I replaced with fresh, color-coded covers are mentioned in the TCDS…

I know you can buy a turnkey part 135 operation, or at least they come up for sale sometimes. But I doubt the single pilot kind would work that way—or at least the pilot would probably not want to follow the certificate. But is it possible to amend one to change the designated pilot, or does it amount to just starting over?
 
This is me checking if the ancient faded formerly-white switch covers I replaced with fresh, color-coded covers are mentioned in the TCDS…

I know you can buy a turnkey part 135 operation, or at least they come up for sale sometimes. But I doubt the single pilot kind would work that way—or at least the pilot would probably not want to follow the certificate. But is it possible to amend one to change the designated pilot, or does it amount to just starting over?
Switch covers are probably not going to be an issue.

There are "boiler plate" 135 documents that you can buy and it will help out a lot but at the end of the day, time is what it really takes.

Here is a good example - I just bought into a partnership in an aircraft that came off a Part 135 certificate. I have all of the documentation for the plane from when it was on the 135 certificate. If I wanted to put this back on a certificate, I would be able to present it to the FSDO PMI but I would still have to prove everything and that takes a lot of time of going through log books, STCs and 337's.
 
There is a myth that people can buy or sell certificates. For clarity, you can buy or sell the company that holds the certificate.

If you are doing this in the same district (FSDO), it’s usually not a problem. It will entail you to have new OpSpecs issued, and if you change the airplane, then of course a new aircraft conformity.

The statement of conformity may need updating as well, as well as the Hazmat manual.

There are a few other documents that will be needed to review.
 
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