Neuro CogScreen Partial Fail...

Discussion in 'Medical Topics' started by SoCalFlyer11234, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. Hey Aviation friends....wonder if anyone has ever been in the same boat (or plane) as me...

    I have slipped memory issues according to the CogScreen; The Neuro wants to do a more detailed, one-on-one testing scenario...verbal/face to face...
    Has anyone else been through this process? I didn't find the CogScreen terribly challenging, but recall BACKWARDS is a challenge in general....

    Not worried about dropping another $1200 on the test, just worried about that'll I'll blank or freeze...

    Thanks for any input...

    B
     
  2. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Bruce C
    so if the psych wants to give you the whole battery it’s because you cannot get a “pass” on how you did I’n the screening battery..... Not much choice, here.....

    Rest up, be relaxed and use the force, Luke.
     
  3. Eric L

    Eric L Guest

    I’ve done cogscreen 5 times. 1st time I did poorly and had to do the big battery of tests and they deferred me for another year anyway. Second time I did ok on cogscreen and they made me do the big battery and approved me for special issuance. 3rd and 4th time I did ok. 5th time I did lousy. I fear I won’t be able to exercise privileges of my 3rd class Medical Certification ever again.

    Remember Cogscreen is FAA’s baby. They commissioned and paid for its development. I’m pretty sure The key component of the cogscreen is your score’s correlation with the group of brain damaged airmen. If the correlation is high they will defer you no matter how you do on the battery.

    Good luck!
     
  4. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Not true. It was Dr. Kay's graduate Ph.D. project
    Completely the opposite. If you do well on the cogscreen, 100% of full batteries make standards. If you do poorly on the cogscreen, the batter acquits a good number.
    Go with a GOOD night's sleep and not even an OTC cold medication in your system.[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]
     
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  5. Navid Ghavami

    Navid Ghavami Filing Flight Plan

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    I cannot emphasize how much a good night's sleep is for this test. I royally screwed up by presenting to the full battery of tests with about 60% of my usual sleep (nerves and staying in a crap hotel). Now 6 months later I have a withdrawn Special issuance and waiting for the FAA's consultant to review my file. With the longer delays at the FAA, a screw up on these test could put you in a holding pattern for a LONG time. Not worth it! If the neuropsychologist will let you split the tests up over 2 days, it might be worth it!

    In regards to the full battery of tests - here is the list but there is little information online about them.

    • CogScreen-Aeromedical Edition (CogScreen-AE)
    • The complete Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales (Processing Speed and Working Memory Indexes must be scored)
    • Trail Making Test, Parts A and B (Reitan Trails A & B should be used since aviation norms are available for the original Reitan Trails A & B, but not for similar tests [e.g., Color Trails; Trails from Kaplan-Delis Executive Function, etc.])
    • Executive function tests to include:
      1. Category Test or Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and
      2. Stroop Color-Word Test
    • Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT).
    • A continuous performance test (i.e., Test of Variables of Attention [TOVA], or Conners' Continuous Performance Test [CPT-II], or Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test [IVA+]), or Gordon Diagnostic System [GDS].
    • Test of verbal memory (WMS-IV subtests, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, or California Verbal Learning Test-II)
    • Test of visual memory (WMS-IV subtests, Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised, or Rey Complex Figure Test)
    • Tests of Language including Boston Naming Test and Verbal Fluency (COWAT and a semantic fluency task)
    • Psychomotor testing including Finger Tapping and Grooved Pegboard or Purdue Pegboard
    • Personality testing, to include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2). (The MMPI-2-RF is not an approved substitute. All scales, subscales, content, and supplementary scales must be scored and provided. Computer scoring is required. Abbreviated administrations are not acceptable.
    Feel free to PM with other questions and good luck!
     
  6. AV82NVIGOR8

    AV82NVIGOR8 Filing Flight Plan

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    So here goes...
    Long story short, I lost my medical due to a brief period of muscle weakness, caused by a minor stroke, due to a PFO. Within a week I was back to work. The PFO was repaired and I'm back to MTB and MX, but not flying. Two years later, as I try to renew my medical, the FAA comes at me with all guns-a-blazing, asking for all the tests Navid listed, and many more. I know my shortcomings so I haven't applied to be a walk-in controller at LaGuardia but heck, "normal" pilots from the majors with 40 years of flying seem to barely score at the 50th percentile. How am I, a mere mortal to surmount such an obstacle. My wife won't play "Memory" with me because she knows she will win, but I've flown in the LAX area airspace for 25 years without incident. I sucked at "Memory " back then, and I suck at it now.
    Recently, I took an appropriately rated pilot (Boeing 777) with me in a flight around LA in my little Cessna. "Geeze, you need to get your medical back..." was his comment. After looking into all the parameters of the NeuroCogscreen-AE etc., I seriously think 90% of pilots wouldn't get a medical if they had to pass this.
    So my short story long, any source of information that could improve my chances of passing would be most welcome. And if there is any interest in my experience going through this, I can check in as well.
    Blue Skies to you...