My Learning Path

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Jeffythequick, Apr 28, 2017.

  1. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Report out on Tuesday's training:
    Got the Tomahawk in the air, and went down by KJZI to fly around a point, which is a lighthouse in the water. Did that, went a little steep in the turn, and had to re-learn this. Went to 2500', and then did some turns with a fix on the horizon. All good there, then we requested clearance to land at KCHS, and got a straight in approach from around KJZI.

    About 3 minutes out, got a call from the tower, "Can you come in a little faster?"
    I pitched down, and throttled from 70 to 100, and the tower wasn't impressed. I don't think the 3 commercial airliners on the ground weren't, either, but after we landed, got off at Taxiway A, and back to Atlantic (FBO).

    Lessons learned: New airplanes take a little time to get used to. I don't need so much crap to fly, just Sectional, Headset, snacks, and water. Everything else is a distraction, at this point. Also, fly the plane. glance at the gauges, like when driving a car.
     
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  2. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    On straight-ins it can be hard to judge when to pull power, in a 172, I've been kind of using the PAPI lights and keeping up cruise speed till I get 3 white at pattern altitude, then start slowing down and going down, that puts you just inside of 2 miles I think, but I like a steeper approach.(vs PAPI 3deg).
     
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  3. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    UGH...

    As a student, remember the CNA:
    Communicate
    Navigate
    Aviate

    My CFI just quit on me. Got an “offer he couldn’t refuse” after a week long trip out west. The game plan was to fly 3x/week, and I set time aside in my life to do that, and this wasn’t helpful. If you’re looking to “move up,” let your students know, so they can make back up plans. The texts for the last few days from him (“I prefer to communicate through text messages.”) made it pretty clear that something was up.

    Luckily, I have a friend whose CFI is willing to “work my a%$# off” for the next month while waiting for his next gig, and that gives me time to have another trained in our PA-38.
    Weather happens. I get that.
    Sometimes the plane isn’t ready. I get that.
    You, Mr. CFI, keeping your cards close to the vest and wasting both of our time I don’t get.

    I guess the point is, don’t waste your student’s time and money. It takes another 2-3 hours to “learn what I know” with each new CFI, and, quite frankly, is frustrating.

    A question for those of you out there. Once I solo, is there a lot of flying that I do on my own, or am I still tightly bound to my CFI for all flying? I mean, my cross country solo, I get that I will be flying alone, but a friend of mine, who doesn’t have his license, flies by himself. Is that normal?
     
  4. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    IMO a CFI should always know what their student is doing, and if possible be present to supervise their student. There are ways, once you solo, to have the CFI endorse your logbook for say, a nearby airport for T&Gs. If you have a syllabus you can see what your solo lessons should be, and Part 61 breaks it down of what is required, which you should be familiar with.

    As you may know, instructing is a means to gain experience, and a means to build up hours for employment for a professional pilot gig. Naturally students/pilots sometimes have a difficult time comprehending that as bonds have been established and their instructor leaves with short notice. I know it's frustrating but your CFI may not have known about the job offer, or they received a short notice notification. Most have applied for numerous flying jobs in the hope of landing one. It's the way it is unfortunately as being a CFI is difficult to earn enough to live on and generally no benefits at all. Presently there is a lot of hiring going on in the corporate and airline worlds and probably going to get worse as far as CFIs leaving for greener pastures. Is it fair to the student? No, but it has always been this way. Good luck in your training
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017
  5. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    A subtle point, but instructing SHOULD be the ultimate in “professional” pilot gigs. But the industry isn’t set up that way. In any other biz, the people teaching had pro jobs doing the work before and THEN went into teaching. Aviation will always be back-ass-wards in this regard.
     
  6. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    I was given a sign-off with a local radius and wind/weather minimums after my solo. I'd just text my CFI when I wanted and let him know when I was going. He'd sometimes give me assignments to go practice maneuvers or pattern work or whatever. Sometimes I'd just go sight seeing as a break from the 'work' flights.
     
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  7. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Thank you for the nice words. In my defense, the CFI never let me know that he was looking for a better gig, and that's where I have the problem. He has a lawn care business, so I figured he wasn't looking to fly Transatlantic flights on United, and he said that he wanted to teach people. My mistake was trusting him. I put it to a friend that this is like dating in high school. You find someone, get to know them, make plans for the prom, and then after one date, they dump you, and you're left to find another date to the prom.

    However, since we're all adults here, if the guy was looking for a better deal, let me, the guy that is relying on you for instruction and training, know so I can be looking for another instructor. Quite honestly, I feel like I was a cash cow, as we had 4 hours of ground instruction, and 1.2 hours in the air. Luckily for me, a friend who just got his license has a friend that can teach me ("work my %$# off for a month" as he put it) for a month. I'll be looking for another CFI in the meantime, but at least I know that the clock is ticking, and I can be proactive, rather than scrambling and being reactive.

    (tirade coming on here...)
    I see all of the "why isn't GA thriving?" threads, and it's basically a customer service issue, from my observations. There have been quite a few times that I've wanted to quit. Not because I was scared, but mainly because of the CFI that I've dealt with (after presenting my Student License, Medical, Ground School Test, and on one occasion, my bank account balance... In other words, I was ready to go):
    The "You need to figure it out, and I'm not going to help you" CFI - Guy that owned his own shop, and told me (while I was in his shop) to go to FAAFlightschools.com and sign up, if I wanted to fly with his school. Wouldn't let me use his computer to do it. Geez Louise, guy... I'm right here! Strike while the iron is hot! I did sign up, and never got a response back.
    The "Phantom" CFI - 6 CFI that never contacted me after I e-mailed them. Not even an "I'm too busy, talk to Joey... he's got time." One did call me back, and so far, he's now a friend and a CFI. Across the country.
    The "I'm not going to get you a CFI until you threaten to go elsewhere" CFI - A flight school that is associated with our flying club that had me fall through the cracks, even when I showed up 5 times, and asked for names and numbers of their CFI (who act as contractors and can fly with me)
    The "We're too busy for you" CFI - Flight school that had 4 CFI walk past me, and one did finally talk to me, as I was behind the counter looking at the books, but he only wanted to know if I was his "4pm appointment." I said, "no, but..." as he turned around and walked away from me.
    The "I am God, no matter the contradicting evidence" CFI - That was the one that absolutely refused to take my written endorsement. I later found out that he does this to everyone - finds fault in what they do, and makes sure they know that they're wrong, in front of crowds.
    And the last one... the "One night stand" CFI - I'll tell you anything you want to hear, take your money, and leave you.​
    (tirade off)
    On the bright side, there are some good ones out there that I've met:
    Jason Schappert - The guy loves flying, and he loves teaching, and it shows.
    My CFI in Everett - He also loves teaching, and gets progressively more strict, the more hours that you fly.
    Amy at Northway Aviation at KPAE - An aviator's aviator. She took my daughters and gave them a 15 minute ground school. Just her and them, as she was pre-flighting an airplane for a Challenge Air Event. http://www.northwayaviation.com/Instructors/new-1/
    An accomplished pilot and a nice person, as well.
    ...and that's about it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017
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  8. Caramon13

    Caramon13 Pattern Altitude

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    That sucks...you gotta figure though, most of the CFI's out there probably who are younger probably don't have degrees, probably still live with mommy and daddy or are on their own with a roommate. They have no life experience and no customer service skills because well, they haven't needed them yet. In fact I'd bet that the kids that get their CFI's via a pilot mill, or even right out of high school probably don't give a rat's ass about anything other than the customer that will get their 40 and pass. Anyone else is a waste of time. That's what they get paid on.

    Not everyone that can "do" should teach. To some it's just a job (like McDonald's) and you're the guy who wants his hamburger fast and special made. The CFI just wants to get 100 hamburgers out the door because well, it adds time to the meter.

    I went into retail sales right out of high school and let me tell you, it teaches you a lot about the average consumer. Took a few more customer service positions and ended up teaching and learned a lot more. It's an ego thing. Most pilots already have an ego, add to that the fire of youth and sometimes you get a know-it-all that thinks what he/she is doing is somehow more important than what you do.

    Age doesn't always make it better though. The flip side of the coin is the older CFI that somehow thinks 10,000 hours of flight time makes him Bob Hoover, but unlike Bob Hoover he probably thinks that's an automatic reason to impose unrealistic expectations on an eager learner which alienate and confuse the person.

    I find it amazing how many CFI's out there pass, but don't "get" the concepts in the FOI part of the license. It should almost be a requirement to actually get some REAL teaching experience as a part of the CFI. As in, go to a school and teach learners of ALL ages to actually experience what it takes to instruct someone right out of high school vs someone who just entered retirement.

    Any egotistical moron can pass two tests and a practical, but it takes a lot more to be an instructor. Sorry you had to deal with the people you did, there are a lot of good ones out there, but sometimes you do have to go through the "weeds" to find them.
     
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  9. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I'll add to my "good CFI" list:
    Amy at Northway Aviation at KPAE - An aviator's aviator. She took my daughters and gave them a 15 minute ground school. Just her and them, as she was pre-flighting an airplane for a Challenge Air Event. http://www.northwayaviation.com/Instructors/new-1/
    An accomplished pilot and a nice person, as well.

    (As a side note, people at Northway say to talk to "Jeff or Amy", which is funny, as my wife's name is Amy as well. The first time I heard that, I did a double take.
     
  10. Caramon13

    Caramon13 Pattern Altitude

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    Awesome, yeah those folks exist. Going outside of a flight school or hanging around an EAA meeting or just shooting the breeze with some guys at the FBO you can find those pilots as well, or an event like you found. A lot of the ones with tons of hours PROBABLY have at one point instructed and may even still be current. Not a given, but it's a fair bet because it's pretty hard (I've found) to accumulate hours professionally once you get your commercial ticket, unless you REALLY scour the earth for the odd job. Much easier to get your CFI and instruct.
     
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  11. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    OK, somebody go develop an app for that, a Yelp for instructors.
     
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  12. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    All that is assuming you get as far as the CFI, I went into a particular FBO 2 or 3 times (feeling like an alien) leaving with no info and no call-backs until I finally happened to show up when a CFI was at the desk who set up a discovery flight(finally). I guess that is the "Who are you and why are you here and I have no info for you I'll take your number and throw it away FBO desk clerk"
     
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  13. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    So, I have good news. I have a new one to add to the list:

    The “Hey! I have to pick up a plane in another city. Want a lesson while we get that plane, and our PPL friend will fly you back” CFI.

    I got a valuable lesson from this professional pilot, learning proper trimming technique, calculating descent rate, and hold short at intersecting runways.
     
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  14. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Just for the record, I'm a "I'm learning to fly as inexpensively as possible, but willing to pay for a good CFI, and when the CFI says 'do this,' I do it and don't argue, but ask questions to make sure I understand" student.

    (you all may have a different opinion, of course...)

    Logbook: 13.6 Hours
    Checkbook (airplane): 10.2 hours
    Checkbook (CFI): 21 Hours (The one night stand CFI increased it by 4 hours for 1.2 of flight time, however, the "Hey, I need a ferry flight" CFI added 0 for his 1 hour of logbook time)
     
  15. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Went out yesterday and did climbs, radio communications with the tower at KCHS (sorry for those that heard it. Re-reading "Say Again, Please" to get the marbles out of my mouth), turns, slow flight, and getting to know my new CFI, and him learning me. Performed a straight in landing at 33, and on approach, heard the Dreamlifter (the transport for the pieces of the 787) explaining how they needed ILS at 33, and how they couldn't come in on 3, so they were held for 20 minutes. When I realized that we were part of that delay, I felt a little guilty. Humorously guilty, though...) make calls on approach.

    Enjoyed the flight, and it was one of those "all the pieces are coming together" flights. Flying by looking out the window, having the "turn to 10°" and seeing the tanks out in the distance, flying towards them, and checking the gauges, rather than checking the gauges and then looking out the window to fly. A little squiggle on the landing, but the "pitch for speed, throttle for altitude" is natural now.

    The CFI I used and I came up with a good deal that works out for the both of us. I appreciate his understanding that we're all learning something. Twice a week, and if the weather pushes it out, we adjust for the days. He wants to be home nights and weekends, which is my prime flying time (have that job thing), so I get out early on Tues/Thurs from work, and get him home earlier.

    Logbook: 14.6 Hours
    Checkbook: 11 Hours

    We talked about the next lesson, and soloing. I'll be doing a lot of pattern work at KJZI, landings, and take offs.
     
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  16. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    It's good to be back in training mode, rather than "looking for a trainer" mode.

    Did 6 (5 T&G, 1 Full stop) landings at KJZI after doing about 90% of the radio calls. I may be one of the weird students, but I like to have the tower there. My CFI gave me a script, which helped out immensely, as it helped with knowing what to say. I've been practicing since we landed. It was a beautiful day to fly, and we got vectored over downtown Charleston, so we got to see the Ravenal bridge, cruise lines, and historic downtown Charleston. (I did get a call from my wife while flying, as she thought I was downtown, and wanted me to pick up some items, but when she did a Find Friends on me again, I was over the Ashley River, and she remembered that I was flying... ) 1.6 hours added

    Next lesson: Forward slips, engine out descents, no flap landings

    Logbook: 16.4
    Instrument: 0.6
    Checkbook: 12.3 (I revised this to only do air training hours)
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2017
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  17. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Flight Report:
    Beautiful weather, on the ground, but 500 feet up, it was rough. Got to pattern altitude at KCHS, vectored to KJZI, and those crosswinds were beating on me. The funny thing is there are a couple of wind patterns around Charleston. The airport winds, and the coastal winds. The coastal ones are usually (in my experience) steady, but the transition is where I get the bumps. This time, the coastal winds were gusting, but I got a couple of landings in, and a go-around. About 40 minutes into it, I decided to ask my instructor if we could go back. I just wasn't feeling good about the learning, as I was spending too much time worrying about the airplane also in the pattern doing T&G, controlling the airplane, and listening to the new stuff.

    On the way back in, the tower was talking about the turbulence to the commercial airplanes taking off and landing, so I figured that I made the right call. Sometimes the lessons aren't what you are being taught, but the decisions that you make when you're not learning. On the way in, the tower asked me if I could do a right 360 over downtown Charleston, due to some check they were doing, and was thanked for obliging them.

    Did a lot of the radio work myself, so that was nice.

    Logbook: 17.5
    Checkbook: 13.2
     
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  18. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Flight Report:
    It was a great day to fly in Charleston, SC! On the ramp, there were 3 Boeing Business Jets, and a lot of people in black SUV at work, so I figured that there was an unannounced VIP visit at Boeing in Charleston. I joked around with the ramp people that these were our new club airplanes.

    Preflight went well, and it’s starting to flow, rather than “check/do”. I do alter the list that is on the aircraft, and that’s to check the fuel before flight, and make the call to get some while I continue the pre-flight, and do a once-around prior to getting in, as well as pull the pitot cover as I’m getting in. The once over is so that the fuel trucks can ensure that the wheels are chocked, and I don’t try to fly off with them chocked. I think of it as a dual wing check, rather than a half and half check. I worry that I’d forget something, and it’s better to preflight twice than 90%.

    For the lesson, we got held by departure with a call back that I’ve never heard: “All traffic stand by, we have to sort some things out.” So, we held at the ramp. After clearance to taxi, there was a Cessna coming in, and I was given clearance at G2, but waited until they turned down G1. I wasn’t sure, but waiting seemed to be the prudent thing to do. Once on Golf, I got held for two airplanes, and then told to (another first) “Turn right on 33, and hold”

    I reported back that I was on 33 holding, and then given clearance to take off.

    Did 7 T&G at KJZI, and had some friendly banter with a twin prop that my CFI knew. In the pattern, we were asked if the afterburners were installed in the Tomahawk. My reply back was , “No, but we gave the mice Monsters before we took off.”

    Performed 3 Engine Outs (a HUGE confidence builder), 2 Normal Landings, 2 Forward slips, and included some forward slips in the engine out simulations too (we were too high). I know that if the engine ever fails on downwind when I’m at 1000 feet abeam the numbers, i and my passengers will walk away. (If it’s a clear day, and no other traffic...)

    Logbook: 19.0
    Checkbook: 14.4
     
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  19. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Wednesday Report Out:
    Performed 8 landings, 1 engine out, 1 go around, 1 no flap, and got them on the GoPro. My CFI agreed to the "we both own this" terms, where neither one of us can publish the videos without express written consent of the other, but we're free to show people from our computers. A funny thing... I forgot to erase the memory card from the last time, and it had 1:38:00 of room, and the flight was 1:39.

    New things learned:
    Land and hold short - tower asked us to land on 03, and hold short of 33, and I read that back*, and we were coming in a little high, and was asked by the tower if we were able to hold short. I resonded back, "we will", and did a forward slip to get the plane down with about 4000 feet to spare, and got a "nice job" from the tower. I smiled.

    Post flight briefing: I usually wear button up shirts, as I come from work when I fly, but I changed from that to an old t-shirt, which was noted by my CFI. He said, "You might want to wear that on our next flight, and bring a sharpie and have some scissors handy." He had his hand held radio with him on this flight. :D We'll start doing short field and soft field take-offs and landings, as well as VOR navigation, and instrument flying in the next few lessons.

    Logbook: 20.6
    Checkbook: 15.7

    *I'd say my radio work is at 70%. I'm not an expert, nor quick with the readbacks, but they can understand what I'm trying to say. I don't have radiophobia, more like ensuring I read stuff back correctly. The tower here at KCHS is easy to learn from, as they have both commercial, private, and military aircraft coming and going, so we get in with C-130's, F-18's, 787, 717, A319's, and Cessnas.
     
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  20. bobmrg

    bobmrg En-Route

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    I've been involved in aviation education since 1968 and your FBO experiences sound very familiar. Wish I knew the answer. In many instances the front desk people are to blame, if blame must be assigned.

    Bob
     
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  21. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Hi Bob,

    I think that there are a few reasons for it, and I think it is, in order of ranking (and what I’ve done to help solve this in my flight club):
    1. No customer support training. As you have said, the front desk is an interesting conundrum. Small FBOs can’t afford a front desk person, and if they don’t have a customer service training as an owner (working as a waiter or a busboy in a restaurant helps), then they really need to learn empathy. A lot of people want to learn to fly, and get put off by the complexity and cost of learning to fly, and they either overload them with information or demands for money.

      What I did to answer the overloading them problem is just sit and talk with them. I’ve also made a flowchart of “how to get a license”, and how the outflow of money works, plus a way to get it without using a credit card.
    2. The CFI issue... It seems that is a natural course of CFI. People go on vacation, people quit, people re-start up, and the “having to teach a new CFI what you know” cost and expense that both the CFI and the student must address from the get go. CFI, if they are good people, need to, as a matter of course disclose to the student what their future is, and share CFI duties with another CFI, so the student can have a “plan B”.

      Often, a new student won’t know what is appropriate to ask, and they are putting all their trust in someone that they just met to teach them a skill they have a desire to learn, but it’s back to #1 (above)

      So, what I’m working on is a CFI checklist for the students, and working with the CFIs at our local flight school that we use. Questions like, “What are your preferred flight times”, “How can I schedule you”, “what do we do if the weather/airplane/illness/one of us winning the Lotto?”, and lastly, “What is our “need to switch CFI plan?” Lastly, having another pilot go with the new student to introduce them to the CFIs.

    3. Mismatched expectations on both parties’ parts. I think that is a complex problem. The flight schools put out a “it costs $8,000 to get a license, but it’ll probably cost more, and we have this great payment plan to get you going, no guarantees, of course, YMMV”

      This presents two problems... The first is if you buy a block of time, the advantage is in the flight school’s court. They have your money, and they dole out flight time and training at, essentially, their convenience. They have your money, and the student has to be willing to bend to the flight school’s wishes. I don’t mean to be negative on this, but when it’s all boiled down, the flight school has your money (usually non-refundable), so the student is at their mercy. If there was some kind of escrow account that people could draw from/replenish, that would work, but until then, I warn fellow students to be sure that they should not put any more than $1000 in these accounts, and make sure that the school is honest about their accounting of your time, and the CFI time.

      The second is the YMMV one, where the student’s progress is subject to the CFI’s opinion of their progress, and the mixture of the CFI and student wanting to sign them off for their tests, the issue with students needing to pass on their first try affecting their FAA rating, and the money stops coming in when the student passes their Checkride, and on the student side, the cost keeps going up when they keep flying, and facing the unknown, and the cost of taking the test, and failing is a $500 (or so) proposition, each time.

      This is also complex, as the basic issue is trust. The student needs to trust the instructor that they are giving the best in all aspects (#1 and #2), and the instructor needs to trust the student to finish and learn the things that the CFI tells them to learn in the off days. Also, the trust issue needs to extend to all aspects of flying, and it should be taken very seriously by the CFI and student. The basic most aspect is “this is what we’re going to do” and doing it, and the building blocks of solo, scaling back taking over, as appropriate, and giving assignments out as appropriate.
      For the students, doing what the CFI has told them, without deviation, having assignments done when asked for, and putting in time outside of the lessons, so that the CFI’s time isn’t wasted.
    Well, that’s what I have so far...
     
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  22. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Whew...:(

    I was gonna congratulate you on something but forgot what it was after reading all, well most, of that. :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
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  23. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    :D

    That’s why I put the hours down... so you can skip to the good parts (if there are any... YMMV)
     
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  24. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Report out for yesterday:

    Preflighted the aircraft early, filled it up, had my t-shirt on, and the GoPro all ready to go, and my CFI came up, and he forgot his headset. I finished the pre-flight, and when he got back, we got going.

    We flew over to JZI, and did a touch and go on 22 (my choice, the winds were at 6kts at 170, and the choices were 9/27 and 4/22), then did another with a full stop. I started smiling, and my CFI had me go back to the 22, pre-takeoff checklist, and got going in the pattern. On final, he told me to do a full stop, the post landing checklist, and then taxi over to the ramp. He asked me, "Are you ready to solo?" :)

    "Yes"
    "Do you have your medical, license, and logbook?"
    "Yes"
    "Give me your logbook, and I'll endorse it."
    :)

    After he got out, said a short prayer (it calms me down, and allows me to focus), I ran through the taxi checklist, and pulled off the ramp. During the taxi to 22, there was no traffic around the airport, and at the takeoff checklist, I had a little anxiety. Rechecked the checklist, made the call, and crossed the threshold, and then it was all what I knew and was trained to do. I was pleasantly surprised at how quickly it got off the ground and climbed. Setting Vy was easy peasy, and went around. I fumbled the "Student Solo" part of the radio calls, but the landing was smooth. Second time around, same thing, but this time there was traffic in the air, a Learjet, and while on the ground, I reported to them that I was on the ground when they asked if there was any traffic in the pattern. Third time around, there was more traffic in the area, and I heard some voices I recognized. My friend, Jay was congratulating me, and Guillaume, from the flight school was chatting it up and cracking jokes, which made me feel better. On the base to final, I knew I had this, and put it down a little long (about 300 feet past the numbers), but smooth.

    So, on the way back, had a little confusion in the cockpit but got it cleared up.

    Flight Log: 22.9
    PIC: 0.5
    Checkbook: 17.2
     
  25. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Oh yeah, the shirt ceremony is on the AOPA Facebook page. OK, my friend got the beginning and end of it. I'll get GoPro video up on FB as well.
     
  26. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Congrats on your 1st Solo!
     
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  27. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Wednesday, November 8:

    KCHS 081756Z 33004KT 3SM -RA BR BKN003 OVC008 12/12 A3005 RMK AO2 SLP175 P0007 60015 T01220117 10122 20106 58008

    Looks like it's simulator time, for the first time I flew a short field takeoff on the sim, into the virtual clouds, flew to the intercept in the VOR between Charleston and Vance at Berkeley County (KMKS), then flew towards Vance VOR, did a teardrop turn back, then used the ADF to get to Summerville (KDYB), then used the VOR to get back to CHS, and did a descending turn to land at KCHS (something that I would say is not recommended in a real airplane).

    I do have a sim at home (not a Redbird), and I'm not sure how to say it, but I was unimpressed with it. I mean, it's good for learning how to operate the VOR and such, but keeping it straight and level was harder than a real airplane.

    I did get to record an hour in my logbook, but I think I'll practice VOR navigation this weekend, and I'd rather just fly.

    Flight Log: 23.9
    PIC: 0.5
    Checkbook: 18.2
     
  28. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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  29. ACG

    ACG Pre-Flight

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    Congrats JTQ!!
     
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  30. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Thank you all for the congratulations!

    Here is the video of the very first solo from KJZI:



    I'm going to bed... It should be ready be 2:30Z
     
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  31. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    Nice, that sun was harsh eh?
     
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  32. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yeah, had to keep my eyes on the numbers or I was blinded by the light. The third time through was fun because my friends were in the area, and gave me congrats on the radio.
     
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  33. Dave Krall CFII

    Dave Krall CFII En-Route

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    Great flight log writeups, enjoyable now for you and everyone but really enjoyable in your years to come. Too bad you moved out of KPAE, could’ve had coffee.
     
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  34. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Thank you for the kind words!

    I’m going to make another video or set of them on how to get a PPL for as little as possible, and do it without going into debt. It involves Craigslist, SI, a simulator, and making the most of what is out there. My daughter is my video guru, so we have to work around her 6th grade schedule.
     
  35. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    November 14, 2017:
    Flight Path: KCHS - KDYB - KCHS
    Landings: 8 (3 Solo)

    Wow, what a blast today was! I was landing at a new airport, doing short/soft field TO/LDG, and to throw more excitement, there was a pilot in an Archer doing banner pick-up/drop-off on the grass strip between the runway and taxiway.

    I got a nice show of him diving and picking up the pseudo-banner, and that looks like a lot of fun, once you know how to do it, but I imagine that the first time through must be... well... interesting. We had good banter back and forth, listening to his instructor telling him how close he got to picking it up, and congratulating him on his progress, and he to mine on the take offs and landings I was doing. Too bad the GoPro didn't have the audio (I found that after I got home). It's fun to be in a supportive community, and I'll keep that in mind until I go to the Hangar group here. I'll take a look at the video, but on my last solo landing he was about 1/2 ahead of me on the right, and it was almost like we were doing parallel landings,

    So, the Soft Field was a bit of fun, essentially riding wheelies until getting off the ground, and short field was less fun. I don't like riding the stall horn, especially as I'm getting off the ground. My best stall recovery is 150 feet, and that puts me about 100 feet below the surface. I know that the stall speed is 52kts on this airplane, but the horn is disturbing, and I'm not sure if this is fear I need to get over, understand, respect, or just something I need to push through. I think that stall training in this aircraft will help. I've already done that on the C172.

    Next up: Fly to KHXD, then to KJZI, two landings, and back to KCHS.

    Solo

    :D

    Logbook: 26.2
    PIC: 1.0
    Checkbook: 21.9
     
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  36. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    November 15, 2017:
    This was the best of times and the worst of times, and I’ll quote some movie lines to make the point...

    “You want to fly rubber dog $#$% out of Hong Kong?” - Top Gun
    Well, I entered the pattern turning right, and it made sense to me, as the LH pattern was over the airport, and that just isn’t what I’m used to at KPAE, which has opposite patterns for the parallel runways. Another airplane asked me, and that should have been my clue, and I’m sorry for making that mistake. The good thing is that we were the only birds in the air in the area, and we had sight of each other.
    Lesson Learned: ALWAYS LOOK AT THE CHARTS

    “A man has to know his limitations” - Clint Eastwood
    With all of the excitement of being solo in the airplane, I was supposed to do some slow flight over the coast, and after the two landings and takeoffs, the radio work, and the questioning from the other pilot on #1, I think I was at my limit for learning. It wasn’t that I was overloaded, it was that I reached my limit for effective learning for the day, and the sun was starting to go down, and even though I know I can fly at night (no training yet), it probably wasn’t a good thing to do on the first complete solo, so I headed back to Charleston. This, I think, was a good thing to do.

    On the way back, I typically push the Tomahawk 5 knots below the top edge of the white arc, about 110 knots, just so I’m not holding up traffic, and it’s fun to go “fast”. I contacted approach, tower, ground, and thanks to my CFI, and Mr. Gardner, I’m feeling like I’m at 95% with my radio work. A few things I messed up on is forgetting to say that I’m a student pilot (they really do slow down, but I was getting what they were saying when they were talking normal speed), and some right/left mix-ups. My mind was thinking “left”, but my mouth was saying, “right”. Again, I think this will come with time.

    Oh, there was a mix up on the flight plan... I wasn’t going to Hilton Head.

    Next up, VOR tracking or night flight. The way that the days are getting shorter, it might be both...

    Logbook: 27.6
    PIC Time: 2.5
    Checkbook: 22.9
     
  37. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    So to summarize, you flew KCHS to KJZI, did 2 circuits on the wrong side of the pattern(on 27 or 4) and headed back? It was a little hard to follow with all the movie quoting.

    Thanks for the updates, keep them coming.
     
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  38. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    It was 4 at JZI.

    Looking at the video, I think I was OK on the first one because I did a long downwind because, for now, when another airplane is doing a long approach, and I'm on the 45, I just give them right of way, and go about 3 miles long, and then come in. I do let them know that I'm doing that, so the Learjet doesn't have to worry about a 70 knot Tomahawk under them. If I'm in the pattern, then I make a judgement call, depending where I am in the pattern, and the time it will take either of us to clear the runway. On 4/22, I spend about 1/4 of the way landing, and the rest driving to the end. For 9/27, I can make the first turn out (the second on 9), and get out of the way.

    Regardless, the lesson was learned. I was relying too much on my CFI for what to do, and now that I'm flying solo, I have to be the PIC.

    The best analogy for the second part is when you first make a meal from a cookbook as a kid. You throw all of the ingredients together making sure that you're doing everything right - measuring everything twice, and when you're done, you have a meal, but looking back, it doesn't seem so hard to make that PB&J sandwich, but that first time, it was.

    These write-ups are so I can see my progression over time, and when I look at some of the things that I did, they seemed so complex, and that is just ignorance being cured with knowledge gained through experience. Hopefully, someone can learn the cheaper way: Someone else's experiences.

    One last quote, and I think it's mine: A smart person learns from experience. A wise person learns from other's experiences.
     
  39. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Also probably the legal thing to do. Review 61.87. Look for the word “night”.
     
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  40. Jeffythequick

    Jeffythequick Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Here's the video from Monday, 14-NOV-2017 (will be available at 8:00Z)
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2017