My first encounter with icing (long).

Discussion in 'Lessons Learned' started by tawood, Dec 12, 2017.

  1. azure

    azure Final Approach

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    Thanks for sharing that @tawood . VFR or IFR, freezing precip has always been my #1 fear when flying in the winter, and I did quite a lot of it in Michigan. Never encountered it there, but there but for the grace of God... sounds like you did good once you had no choice but to continue to land. In the future I'll bet you'll be a lot more hesitant to launch when there is any chance of running into the bad stuff. Fly safe.
     
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  2. GMascelli

    GMascelli En-Route

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    Thanks for sharing the experience, a pucker factor for sure.
     
  3. Indiana_Pilot

    Indiana_Pilot Line Up and Wait

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    I have had a few encounters with icing as well.. (actually have it on video) It was not forecast when I took off from 80 degree weather and flew back home.. hit a front that was moving faster than forecasted. I was on top at 8000' and still showing almost +5C or more.. I started my decent and upon entering the clouds...here come the PIREPS of Rime ice. The cloud layer was only 3000ish feet thick.. I elected to continue my decent but picked up a bit of ice.. it melted about 2000' AGL.. not exactly fun but the airplane flew fine (I am not saying it's ok to do this)

    I planned and was careful but still encountered it.. I filed IFR below the bases for the 2nd leg :)
     
  4. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    Actually, this is the one thing that I questioned. (Great job, by the way, Tawood. Thanks for sharing.) I am not sure that I would have put on the carb heat as a matter of course. I would want to wait until I see some signs that my primary air source has been restricted by ice. At full power, he's probably not going to get carb ice, so I probably wouldn't have applied it prophylactically. But, what do others think?
     
  5. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    With ice on the wings, wouldn't those numbers be out the window?
     
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  6. Indiana_Pilot

    Indiana_Pilot Line Up and Wait

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    You fly it any way it will fly!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. 455 Bravo Uniform

    455 Bravo Uniform Pattern Altitude

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    Great job! Can't second guess what you did because it worked. If you had to get the plane down NOW, you did just that. I can't imagine doing what you did if you had to use only the side window for reference at an unfamiliar field.

    Would flaps have helped? Or hurt due to reduced flow over the elevator? Mighty tempting to drop flaps to drop stall speed.
     
  8. NoHeat

    NoHeat En-Route

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    I'm wondering if your air cleaner was developing ice. Does your induction system have an ALT AIR that you can engage in the cockpit by pulling a lever? That's how I am supposed to respond to a perceived reduction in power in my plane, although I'm not sure how rapidly I would think of doing it.

    Like others, I thank you for sharing your experience.
     
  9. swingwing

    swingwing Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yes......it is called “carb heat”
     
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  10. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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  11. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    Yes. Typically the alternate air source is opened by the same control that turns on carb heat. I know that that is true in my plane's case. I presume it's true for the one that Tawood was flying, too.
     
  12. keen9

    keen9 Pre-Flight

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    No. They won't be exactly correct, but they are still going to be close. Your planform, wing area, and chord have not changed significantly. When the airfoil shape changes enough to dramatically change best L/D speed, you are really screwed.

    Do you have a method to get a better number while flying in the ice?
     
  13. PPC1052

    PPC1052 En-Route

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    I understand that some POHs have a recommended airspeed with ice. But if it's not in the POH, I wouldn't know. If I were in the air, I would have to take my cues from what the airframe is telling me. I just don't honestly have any way to know if the book numbers for a clean airframe apply in this situation or not. My question is what is the basis for thinking those numbers are close. I'm not saying they aren't. I just don't have any information one way or the other to go on.
     
  14. denverd1

    denverd1 Filing Flight Plan

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    Wow. I thought it would take a lot more ice to change how the plan flew. Surprised the ice pictured would cause a problem holding altitude. Thanks for posting, glad you were able to get it down safely

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
     
  15. azure

    azure Final Approach

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    It doesn't take much. Anything that changes the airflow around the wing surfaces can affect flight characteristics, and that rough rimy stuff will definitely change the airflow, even if it's only a fraction of an inch thick. It's recommended to not take off with even a thin layer of frost on the lift-producing surfaces.