Live and learn!

Discussion in 'Lessons Learned' started by Jim Case, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    So I was up above Detroit Yesterday night, practicing as usual. My former instructor came in on the radio, we talked a bit, he asked me my altitude and IAS. Replied "I'm at 100 feet and going about 5 and a half thousand." His replay, "are you sure about that Jim?;) "Yes, oh wait no, no" we laughed, live and learn.


    Can't diside if this should be here or hanger talk.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2016
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  2. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I'd say Hangar Talk unless there is a lesson to be learned here.

    We've all said silly things on the radio at one time or another. Not much consequence to that, usually.

    Just the other day, I called into Tower at night and reported 10 miles south, and got told to make a straight in for 31R. Then, I realized that doesn't work and corrected it to 10 miles north. Light traffic, bored controllers, no airspace busts, nothing but a light chuckle and a correction to enter right downwind for 31R.
     
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  3. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Yeah probably hanger talk, but I'm all over that forum already. :)
     
  4. Hank S

    Hank S En-Route

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    "Live and learn!" Nit what I was expecting . . .

    Often life gives the test first, then those who survive get the lesson. Be glad about it this time.
     
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  5. Mtns2Skies

    Mtns2Skies Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    What were you flying that you were going 200 IAS?
     
  6. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    100. That's a typo. Thank you for pointing that out. Anyway it's a warrior, II. technically it Can go 200 kph acording to piper but, you will not see me attempting it. Was at about 100 KIAS.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2016
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  7. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Mtn skies pointed out to me, the original post is too wrong. I was going pretty slow at about 70% power, taking in the sights of the city at night. If it read 200 kias, the radio guy would have freaked out, me too actaully.
     
  8. Hank S

    Hank S En-Route

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    Why do you not want to try reaching 200 kph? 100 knits = 185 kph (my kph is kilometers per hour; what did you mean?).
     
  9. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    The Ceiling for the warrior II is said to be like 215 Kph or somthing close. I'm not experienced enough to push it to the ceiling, or if I am i just dont desire to. I was at about 100 Knots Indicated Airspeed, probably closer to mid 90's . Somthing like 160's 170's Kilometers or in the ballpark. 200
    Is Way fast for me.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2016
  10. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    So last night I did a real dodo move, that's belongs here on lessons learned. I made my whole flight, an hour and a half practice run, got ready to line up for decent. Decencing, noticed engine was running extremely hot. Checked throttle, all good. Didn't enrich the mixture, should have checked that before the throttle. I can't believe it really. I felt really stupid, even though I caught it well before it got dangerous. I still feel stupid, and I clearly got too cocky and was ignoring my systems / checklist. It won't happen again.
     
  11. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    How hot is extremely hot? When oil temperature starts to get close to redline, it emits a rather distinctive smell.
     
  12. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Im not sure exacly. It was over the 200 mark which is slightly out of the "green zone" on this specific Model. It didn't smell, and I was able to correct it in time without issue. cruising, it would not have run nearly so hot. as said I forgot to enrich the mixture upon descending. I wish the guage would give more precise values, but it wouldn't make a huge difference.
     
  13. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I guess "extremely" is a hyperbole. But enough to startle me
     
  14. orange

    orange Line Up and Wait

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    My first thought would be hypoxia. Or maybe dyslexia.:p
     
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  15. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Hypoxia at 5000 is not out of the question. It's low, but it happens.

    It's useful to learn your hypoxia "tells" if it can be done in a safe manner. I discovered mine when I ran out of oxygen at 13000. Fortunately, my "tell" is rather obvious. There is no reason to be sweating in -7 C weather.
     
  16. James_Dean

    James_Dean Pattern Altitude

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    Can you describe your normal leaning procedure? The mixture is going to go more lean as you descend and I'm surprised that during a descent that mixture would cause an oil temp rise like that unless the cylinders were getting absolutely cooked.
     
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  17. Zeldman

    Zeldman Final Approach

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    You did know that 5 out of 4 pilots are dyslexic, right...??? ;)
     
  18. Jim Case

    Jim Case Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Slow increments. It's wasn't really getting cooked I could just tell somthing was off, it was just a bit over the 200 notch on the tempature gauge, I should have started enriching well before I did, I was looking to see if I had been using too much throttle on decent before I even thought of enriching my fuel air mixture, which should have been done before I even noticed a problem, I felt dumb. It's cool though, as the thread says, Live and learn.
     
  19. azure

    azure Final Approach

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    I'm not an A&P, but I find it very surprising that you were getting oil temperatures that high in descent, even leaned for altitude. First of all, normally during descent your power is reduced. Second, your airspeed is higher, so there's more airflow which should keep the engine, and the oil, somewhat cooler. If I'm cruising ROP, I sometimes do not enrich the mixture until pattern altitude. The main reason to enrich the mixture in descent is (a) in case you will be cruising at a lower altitude and (b) when approaching the airport, so that you will have full power available in case of a go-around. Some schools of thought teach to stay lean right through the landing since you should be able to push in both mixture and throttle in one motion in case of a go-around, but that doesn't work too well for me (small hands lol). Still, there shouldn't be any harm to the engine or risk of either excessive CHT or oil temp if you fail to lean during the descent, as long as you're running at reduced power (which is necessary in my plane, anyway, to avoid approaching Vne).
     
  20. MAKG1

    MAKG1 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    High oil temperature can also be caused by detonation (unlikely at low throttle), or by low oil level.