It's Official: Started PPL training today! Learning in our 182

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Sinistar, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 29 (~84hrs)
    > Short Version: First flights with new CFI

    > So after the annual, wx delays and some logistics with the new instructor it game on again!
    > I had done some solo work the day before our first flight. There was a skylane waiting to depart. I had just stuck this great short field, making the first taxi turn (yes..that one is short!). My CFI comes on the Unicom "Hey is that you!" Turns out he was doing a IR lesson at the same time. Cool!
    > Anyway, next day first thing he says is you're way to comfortable at your home base. So we struck out hitting airports I had never done. He definitely does things differently than the previous instructor. No better or worse, just a different style.
    > We practiced overflying the field at PA + 1000 and then tear drop 270's back down into the downwind. Interesting. Previous instructor taught to enter on upwind and then turn crosswind at departure end of runway to work into downwind. My wife usually crosses midfield and then into downwind. I'm starting to think there are probably 19 other ways to do it now :)
    > The toughest & funnest challenge was a airport within my solo range (Le Seur). Nice airport but has a pit at the end of the runway and the runway slopes down towards it. The wind was switching so we landed both directions to get used to flying over that pit. And, to really challenge me he had me do one with a slight tail wind. Wow, flare lasted forever. And with the runway sloping down and a pit at the end it really had my attention! I will definitely practice at this airport again (not the tail wind part though).
    > The first lesson went 2 hours so we ended with a full hour of night flight! I did 3 landings for him. I guess I never thought I would fly at night again until after PPL since I had the night dual, night landings etc already done.
    > Lets make it even more interesting. Last takeoff that night, he is watching the side of the runway thinking he might have seen deer/critter eyes (I've seen deer and coyote here already). I come around the corner, add full power and then see this light up ahead and high. He says pull the power. We maybe held hands briefly :) as we both reached to the pull the power at the same time. I braked hard enough that one tired lightly screeched and then took the first taxi turn off. Turns out this Bonanza (no you are not evil, your planes are actually quite cool) was on a straight in final and probably pretty far out with really bright lights. And his final was going to be downwind/tailwind??? Someone probably didn't check the AWOS. Anyway, once clear of the runway the CFI was going to talk and said "Can I". He said "Sure" so I said: " Glencoe traffic, Skylane one two Quebec, aborted takeoff on runway 31 due to traffic on long final for runway 13, clear of the runways, Glencoe". A bit later the Banana pilot said he would enter the downwind for 31. No harm, no foul and it turned out to be another great lesson.
    > The second training flight was the other day. Really hazy so we kept nearby, climbed to 4000 to get above it and started reviewing stalls, engine outs and Slips for the first time!!!! I think I really did good on his engine out, found a great field, saw and avoided a large power lines and was all the way to 40 flaps and maybe 500agl before a go around.
    > On the way back from the flight I did my trademark - 4 whites on final - but I slipped it - wow - why the hell did I not learn that like 20hrs back with the previous instructor. I need to do this again with the instructor but now I get it.
    > I asked what he's thinking. He said other than emergency descents (last thing I have not done) he said he feels I'm going really good and just need to "tighten" everything up a bit.
    > I love his energy level...I can sense he genuinely wants to help me finish up. I could see learning IR from him.
    > I know there are always delays and I'm sure I'll probably need to fly with him a few more times that I might expect.
    > Just nice to be flying again :)
    > Also, trying out some QT Halo's but I'll PIREP those in another thread.
    > And my Garmin Pilot just updated again, now seems to have many of the iOS version features. Last update added glide rings, log tracks, etc. I don't really use the tablet that often - but it didn't crash an I was able to see my fight track afterwards. I thought Cloud Ahoy was pretty cool but I think the EFB makers will have the advantage on this feature.
     
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  2. Ronbonjovi

    Ronbonjovi Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Awesome to hear you enjoy your new instructor. I've flown with two and they both are energetic and enthusiastic. I couldn't imagine being in a plane with someone who seems like they don't want to be there.

    I fly out of a relatively busy uncontrolled airport and have seen so many different kinds pattern entries I lost count. I did an overfly with a 270 back into downwind on my first solo cross country. I know I will be doing a 45* entry to the downwind on my checkride though, that is for sure.
     
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  3. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    I'm curious, where did this instructor learn to fly? There's one school I'm aware of that does this procedure and they aren't terribly far away from you.
     
  4. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    I should clarify, this was to enter a pattern when coming in and letting down from the upwind side. If I was approaching from the downwind side I would surely do a 45deg in the downwind. The new CFI didn't make this mandatory for me during training, but I did like learning about it.

    I can see some disadvantages as well. Since you're up high at first, you'll be clear of pattern traffic. However the spiral is to the right and down. I find it really hard to spot traffic down below against the ground. For left traffic, this is a right turn so a bit harder to spot traffic out the copilot side. And maybe less relevant, but coming down in a high wing this is probably a bit safer than in a low wing.

    I guess I still like the method of entering a upwind, crossing at departure end of runway and then back into downwind. I felt like I could see things better, especially other traffic at PA.
     
  5. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Not really sure, being he's a CFII he's probably had several instructors show different ways. Most likely someone out of Thunderbird at KMIC or Air Trek (?) Out of Flying Cloud or Lakeville.
     
  6. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    It's a UND thing, so I'd be surprised if he didn't spend some time up there or learn it from someone who did. That's the only reason I asked. The guy who gave me most of my primary training was a UND graduate and was insistent that this was the only technique to be used when entering the traffic pattern. I never really liked doing it that way and entered in a more conventional manner post checkride.
     
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  7. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Just that one sentence tells me you found the right finish up instructor... if the other instructor hasn’t shown you (or it just didn’t click for whatever reason) how to get a 182 to fall out of the sky without flaps, just using good old aerodynamic knowledge and applying it, something was missing there.

    And the instructor is right, tightening up is the order of the day. As in... “How can I properly plan this approach so I’m not 4 white lights high?” ;)

    Fixing four white is easy and safer than fixing four red, of course. :)

    Sounds like this instructor is making you command the aircraft. You’re PIC. Get down from here... Good!
     
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  8. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    I so can't believe I wasn't taught slips for being high on final. Maybe that just made me better at landing over a 243ft obstacle :) Anyway, did an hour of solo flight this morning and purposely practiced them. Wow! I know its about being ahead and flying a proper pattern. But I know there will be times where that slip could come in handy....like demonstrating it on the checkride! I don't want to bash the last instructor, he did teach me a lot of stuff. The new (and younger) instructor on one occasion already was like..."Never thought of it that way, I would keep doing that". I just wish #1 had cranked up the pace. Now there's a decent possibility of finishing after Jan 1st, so new sectional, new FAR/AIM, etc, etc.
     
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  9. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 30 (~85hrs)
    > Short Version: One Solo Flight, CFI's day job took priority, Another Aborted Takeoff!

    > The CFI was getting behind on his day job, seemed a bit stressed so just did one solo on Sunday.
    > I can't believe I hadn't learned slips to help on final if a bit high...wow and duhhh. So practiced those a bit, easing into, nothing too aggressive.
    > Most interesting experience...had the engine spit at me as I gave it throttle for a go around. Lately I have only been practicing go arounds on the long runway at the Delta that I can still solo to. I landed nice and short, cleaned up everything...IN THE WRONG ORDER...and as soon as I pushed the throttle in it hiccupped, kind spit or popped and had no power. Never died, all temps and pressures were normal. I just calmly (and instinctively) pulled the power back out and rolled off at the next taxi exit and made it a full stop. CFI#1 had warned me about something. He said "You keep pushing in that carb heat before the throttle on the go around and you'll have a surprise this winter" He never really explained it to me. So as of now I believe my incorrect order must have had it setup a bit too rich or maybe that initial gulp of cold air coming right after the carb heat on final does something??? Anyway, I pulled off and ran it up again. The engine developed power just fine, both mags good, etc. Flew it home and did a few more landings. Its funny, I never push in carb heat first on a go around but for touch and go I somehow got into that habit. Would love to know why this happens?
    > Now getting into the winter groove. Yesterday was a good example as it was about +15F the morning I flew. Drove out the day before and pulled the plane over to the self serve with "tug" (our old garden tractor), topped it off and back to the hangar. Now I miss the fuel truck :( Plugged in the tannis, plugged in the tender, covered up the nose inlets and let her warm up good. When I arrive in the morning I first unplug the tender and put a very tiny ceramic heater (with tip switch) up in the front and plug it in. Keep an eye on it and do the pre-flight. About 30 minutes later the preflight is all done, gyro and the radios are warmed up to about +50F inside. Its actually comfortably warm in there! Unplug everything. Remove heater. Push it out, close the door and it starts like a summer day. Very fortunate to have a enclosed hangar (metal, no insulation) and electricity for all this. Winter does slow things down. Even worse if I need to shovel and plow a 2 feet of ice/snow from in front of the door. That's coming.
    > I didn't think the exotic stuff flew in the winter. Wrong. I think I was taxied right up but remained at a right angle to and back away from a L-39? Big sucker. He rolls on down the runway, looks like he took 4,918 of the 5,000 feet! I get a cleared for takeoff and wake turbulence warning. Decent cross wind but I count off another 45 seconds just to give it some time. Density altitude was like -1400 (I love that!). So was very easy to take off well before his rotate point.
    > Hopefully we can get in another lesson at the end of the week if the CFI can catch up. Just need to cover one more maneuver that I have been missing and then it should be review and fix any crap I am doing wrong.
    > Its winter. I have to concede its going to slow down now. All I want for Christmas is my PPL, my PPL, my PPL :)
     
  10. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 31 (~87hrs)
    > Short Version: One Long Solo Flight, CFI's day job taking priority

    > CFI's day job had him busy all last week. Now he's opening up for a longer stretch so this week we are now scheduled for Friday, Saturday and maybe Sunday.
    > Wx was pretty nice so did a long 1.9hr solo flight. Wow, did that tire me out. Practiced each specialty landing/takeoff. Did slow flight turns and altitude changes. Stalls (power on and off). Did 45 degree turns to each side until I hit my wake each time (one burble was awesome!). Turns about a point. A few slips to land. Practiced engine out to 500agl and recoveries (always over a large grass strip). Short flight to Delta, with T&G, full stops, departure, tracking VOR, etc. With the exception of a real XC navigation and divert or engine fire simulation, I think I covered the majority of what a check ride might have. Felt really good.
    > Turn coordinator went out (separate thread). Looking into the "least downtime" solution. Sounds like I'll need to order a rebuilt one, then fly it in for a quick swap out. Still figuring that one out.
    > November has been unseasonably - seasonable :) So not getting in any actual dual time has been a bit frustrating. Never know when the -18F and 20G35 will roll in and last until March.
     
  11. Wheels

    Wheels Pre-takeoff checklist

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    It’s not just a UND thing, it’s the FAA’s preferred method straight out of the Airplane Flying Handbook page 7-5. That being said I rarely use it or see others use it.
     
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  12. Wheels

    Wheels Pre-takeoff checklist

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    If your first instructor never taught you slips but endorsed you for a solo then they didn’t do their job properly. Slips to a landing is one of the maneuvers that is required to be taught before solo by 61.87.
     
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  13. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Brad, what does your checklist say for go-arounds? Are you training in the 182? Usually you put full power in and carb heat off almost simultaneously (push in together).

    BALKED LANDING (Go-Around)
    Power.................................................FULL THROTTLE
    Carburetor Heat...................................................COLD
    Wing Flaps...........................................RETRACT to 20º
    Upon reaching an airspeed of approximately 60 MPH, retract flaps slowly.
     
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  14. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    The 182 checklist for balked landing is what you included above. And I always apply throttle first and then push in carb heat (cold) on any go around. Immediately followed by flaps 40->20 (kill off he drag), watch pitch angle, speed builds, flaps 20->10, then flaps 10->0 just a second or two later as speed continues to build and gaining altitude. I have never done it otherwise.

    But for some ridiculous reason its touch and goes that I need to re-learn the carb heat order.

    This is for normal landings (not soft or short). As soon as I have landed and the rollout is centered and controlled I immediately start cleaning up the plane. I immediately retract the flaps as it takes them awhile to come in from 40->0deg and gets the brakes working better. While they are retracting I immediately push the carb heat back in (cold) and then reach down and get the cowl flaps open. If I still have plenty of runway left, centered and was planning for a T&G...then I roll the power on, right foot gets a workout again and we're off. Since already rolling good the 182 pretty much jumps off in just a few seconds.

    My first CFI noticed me doing that order and said when it gets cold you'll be in for a surprise. Since I moved to another CFI before it got cold I never experienced what he was probably going to teach me. I believe he knew that the engine would do this if I went carb heat in (cold) just prior to full throttle.

    I think where my habit formed was that for landings I always land with power off to stall. It was usually nice warm weather. When cleaning up the plane, it is at IDLE and full carb heat (warm) as a result of the pre-landing checklist. So the plane is idling but running at such a low RPM due to IDLE throttle and full carb heat (now rich) that I want to get back to a nice taxi/idle setting. So I think that is where the pushing the carb heat back to cold right after landing became a habit. Makes the engine idle and taxi nicer than with carb heat on. And I know if I apply throttle first and then remove carb heat it will be different than a normal takeoff. When he had me try this once it just felt weird because going full throttle first (carb heat still warm) the engine is running rich doesn't have the same sound and power as a normal takeoff where the throttle is applied with carb heat cold. So its like my T&G routine is trying to closely mimic a normal takeoff but in the case of carb heat and cold wx these two can not be the same?

    Clearly the plane is setup well in that the engine has never died on final with throttle to IDLE over the numbers and full carb heat. Also, I always check throttle to IDLE and full carb heat during run up to make sure it continues to IDLE.

    I still don't understand what it was that he knew would happen. Is that blast of cold air just prior to throttle just enough to lean it out and the engine stumbles a bit?
     
  15. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I don't know, never really heard of that, but then I'm down south so that could be why.

    Use this, POWER first! What do you do approaching or recovering from a stall, POWER. Go-arounds, POWER. Touch and go (after cleaning it up), POWER. Normal takeoff, POWER. Say this a million times and you'll have it. Someone else will have to help on the crab heat deal. You're in MN? Maybe @Norman will. Or @denverpilot.
     
  16. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Can’t say that I’ve ever seen the order become a problem on my 182, but... I generally push both up simultaneously by extending my thumb on my right hand over to the carb heat. Doesn’t work as well left handed from the right seat, but I can do it with an index finger. Smoooothly.

    I have seen the O-470 stutter and cough on throttle advancement done too fast, carb heat or none. How fast do you push it up? The fuel injected 182s don’t do it, usually.

    Usually on mine, carb heat makes the mixture incredibly rich. On long instrument approaches at low power the blubbering will annoy me from it, and I’ll even lean a touch back just to keep engine ops smooth.

    Downside is, it’s too lean for a go-around, so if I have to, I leave the carb heat on... for a moment while I reconfigure. That’ll keep me away from over-lean operation for a second while I enrichen.

    So it goes something like...

    power up... that gets me the vast majority of the power I need, pitch for airspeed/climb....

    simultaneously either shoving the mixture full rich, or at our altitude, twisting it two turns back in where it was before I leaned it...

    ...then carb heat off.

    In other words... fly the engine for best behavior and smooth operation, both by the engine and the pilot.

    (Remember, we take off around here leaned. And taxi VERY leaned. If we followed the POH to the letter we’d foul plugs constantly and it wouldn’t be good for the engine to be that rich all the time. On a really hot day, it’d hinder performance a LOT to be full rich for takeoff.)

    Even at sea level our O-470 is a blubbery mess when full rich at idle. I won’t taxi it down there full rich, but it’s full rich for takeoff, and then I start leaning even before reaching cruise. Full rich is “to go” on the checklist until takeoff clearance or rolling on to the runway, and since I know I lean aggressively on the ground, it’s an ingrained last check when lined up on the paint, along with lights, transponder, DG, and a brief of runway length and expected performance and where we are going if the engine quits.

    At your altitude, are you full rich for T&G ops? Definitely have to move the throttle up smoothly if so... at least on mine. It doesn’t like jabs of power full rich.
     
  17. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    Im neither of the guys you called out but I can tell you that a 182 will run like crap at low power settings in really cold weather. It's bad enough that you'll never really get a good post maintenance run up check without installing the cowl to retain some heat.

    Most of my 182 flight time is in the spring, summer, and fall, when the temperatures are warmer, but I've never really noticed much difference in the order of operation when adding the power on a stall recovery or go around.
     
  18. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Never had that problem. It gets cold here. Not Alaska cold, but cold enough. And are you talking O-470 old ones or Lycosaur new ones?

    If yours is running badly cold, something is wrong.
     
  19. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    I've mentioned it before (and you argued with me) but I think you have mixture or carburetor problems. Of the 5 or so Continental powered, carbureted 182s I've been around and flown at low altitudes they all have been able to be operated at full rich without a problem. Maybe I've just been lucky.
     
  20. mondtster

    mondtster Pattern Altitude

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    It gets cold here, and will get just as cold where Brad is. They run like crap with no cowl in the winter.

    These are carbureted Continentals by the way. I have no experience with the R182 and its carbureted Lycoming, but I've heard they naturally run rich. The one post restart Lycoming powered fixed gear 182 I've flown ran good without fouling plugs but I only flew it a couple of times and that was in the summer.

    By the way, you probably don't see the problem with your airplane in cold weather because it is so grossly rich that it is just closer to right when it gets cold. I don't consider Denver a terribly cold climate either.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2017
  21. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    I wasn't calling anyone out, hope Brad didn't take it that way, just emphasizing to Brad that power is the first thing to apply, although everything is almost done simultaneously.
     
  22. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    I doubt it. Others I've flown around here behave the same. I'm also probably over-stating the "blubbing" because after hundreds of hours in the thing, I just can just hear it. And it's annoying. And probably not good. But the engine never has any real operational problems from it whatsoever.
     
  23. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    First off, no offense to any of the responses. I'm learning so much here, it's awesome!!!

    Just to answer a few things...before the Victorias Secret Fashion show starts...priorities!

    Yes, in MN just west of the Twin Cities. So all training and XC have been at 1000msl +- 17ft.

    I'm thinking Nate was spot on, I think I probably rushed the throttle in on that Touch & Go. I usually take closer to 2 seconds to bring on full throttle for normal takeoff. For go around its probably closer to 1 second. My wife told me early on not to slam it in...but not to dilly dally either....she's a pilot :)

    Regarding mixture. ALWAYS full rich on take off, pattern arrival, pre landing, landing, go around, touch and go, etc.

    Regarding the O-470-U running rich...oh yeah. Pretty crazy rich. If you're not idling and taxiing with pretty aggressive leaning you'll start fouling plugs and wondering were the fuel is going. For training, I never lean until practice area altitude is reached. For longer climbs I have done as Nate says and start leaning a bit during the climb while backing off on power and shallowing the climb rate. At cruise lean again. Doing that and those 13+gph rates can be down around 11 and often closer to 10.

    Regarding Carb Heat and the engine burbling...OH YEAH! Each instructor is like what? As I mentioned in another post, once with first CFI on a slow day on downwind we leaned just slightly and boy did it run smooth. Put it back full rich before turning base. So, I've gotten used to the engine kinda burbling along on downwind. By the time you've turned to final and throttled back and slowed down you don't notice it as much or at all. It also doesn't do it at higher power settings. Sort of like the high end of the white arc. Unlike Nate, I am way too green yet to have mixture at any other than full rich once arriving and in the pattern. It's funny, Nates mention of the carb heat and sort of rough engine running during letdown/arrival is the first I have actually read about it. The joys of carburetors.
     
  24. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    It’s just a big dumb engine that sounds like a Harley. Straight pipes and huge bore cylinders. There’s not much to an O-470. The carb and intake manifold isn’t all that intelligent of a design, either.

    The blubberyness is likely just a couple of cylinders way rich while the others are fine. It’s why you can’t get them lean of peak without them running incredibly rough... same induction system, same airflow problems, never two exactly alike.
     
  25. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 32 (~91hrs)
    > Short Version: 4hrs with CFI, Grass Strips, More Airports, One Instrument Approach

    > Got it in two great flights with the instructor.
    > He said the remaining flights will be check ride maneuver reviews only :)
    > Wow, I have now landed at 20 different airports! Four were Delta's. Three under the Bravo. A couple narrow 40ft wide runways. A few short ones in there too. And grass.
    > Grass strips. I was reluctant. He was persistent :) But I would now feel comfortable landing at a grass strip for a slow or semi-busy fly in.
    > The new CFI really wanted to get me out of any comfort zone. I think it was wise. The last three airports on Saturday all seemed almost routine, like landing back at home. Even though one was an example instrument approach (a forever 12nm radius to the final) and one was along the St.Croix river valley.
    > Crazy busy on Saturday. His ADS-B in was showing traffic all around. Unicom was crazy. I'll be happy to have the traffic alerts, even if not all planes out there show up. We had one coming in 400ft below directly towards us. I never would have seen that one during cruise.
    > Now trying to figure out how to get the last dual rides in, get the turn coordinator fixed and deal with the real winter coming this week :(
     
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  26. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    Dude, you're gonna pass my total time before your ride. :) I'd have probably flown more too with my own plane though. Thanks for the updates.
     
  27. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Yeah, I have long given up on the "be done in 55hrs" dream. I figure everyone will give me crap now too :)

    I solo'd at about 25hrs so that slowed me down. Right after that though things were cruising along with all three solo XC's done in one week! And then it seemed to just drag on and on. I was always ready to fly, always felt ready for the next thing.

    I think the first CFI didn't want to do any night flights until September (I was ready in August), I pushed and we finally did them. And he didn't want to do anything else until the night work was done. Arggghhh!!!

    And then it just got weird. I would ask: "What's next, where do I stand." The response was often along the lines of why do I need to know, things take time, but never anything like you are "here" and we need to get "there". Maybe it was bad? I will never know?? I have words I want to write right now but I'm not going too.

    My gut went off once right around solo time to switch and I didn't. The second time (October) I said I'd rather switch and take the setback than continuously wonder and be frustrated. That decision was not easy, sucked actually.

    Here's the dumbest thing, at the end we had switched to doing lessons for cash. I'm thinking I'm almost done. And I know he didn't get much of the FBO's fee. I thought he would have been all over that - no urgency whatsoever, zilch???? Plus, I didn't tell him, I was going to give him a nice cash tip at the end.

    I look at it this way now. Of that 91hrs, I believe I'm now over 30hrs of solo. I've hit 20 different airports and learned a ton. The new CFI is more positive and definitely more up front about status. This winter wx will probably set me back even more, completely sucks. I've always been safe and careful. I never rush. I absolutely love flying, taking care of the plane and being around aviation. I will not give up on this PPL. My wife has been awesome about everything, deferring flying so I can do a lesson whenever I can. She rocks!!!!

    But after this, other than the mandatory flight reviews I want nothing to do with flight instruction (given or received) for a long time. I just want to fly, learn something new each flight or trip and be awesome at flying the old Skylane. Rant over. I think I deserved that one.
     
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  28. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    Yay!

    Sounds like this new CFI is a good match. And there’s a LOT of people who have never landed on grass... so you’re ahead of the curve on that one.

    What’s up with the TC? Flopping around like a fish, or just dead? Bummer. Shouldn’t be too awful to fix/replace though. Make sure whoever installs it uses a freaking level and doesn’t just level it to the airplane...

    I’ve seen a number of them that must have been installed with a main gear tire low on one side, because they’re cockeyed and in flight the ball never sits in the center when the airplane is level with no yaw... quite annoying. Sloppy maintenance. Usually rentals.
     
  29. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Its a "DPE will notice right away" kind of dead :)

    The rather obvious "ELEC FAIL" red flag is now visible even after power is applied. Pretty sure any DPE will latch onto that right away. The annoying grinding noise is gone though! This avionics shop is pretty good, I would be really surprised if they didn't level it properly. Maybe this needed to happen now anyway. Our DME has not been working. Its just been sitting there turned off. I might pull it, get a blank plate and have them redo the W&B. That way all the paperwork is update for any check ride.
     
  30. denverpilot

    denverpilot Taxi to Parking

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    We had someone do a W&B with and without our dead DME, because it had a friendly Allen screw that we could remove and put it back as we tried to get young avionics techs who don’t know how to do component level testing to fix it. (With appropriate log entries of course.) They never succeeded, BTW.

    One of the reasons we are going GPS. LOL. A minor one compared to what the GPS offers, but going from /A to /U as an IFR platform sucks.
     
  31. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 33 (~93hrs)
    > Short Version: 2hr Mock check ride + ground school prep. ADM - ceilings :(

    > First cold flight. Was +3F when I started the plane. Definitely nice having a hangar and engine heater.
    > Did a 2hr long mock check ride flight.
    > The power on stall had the CFI going "Holy $%^#!", felt like were pointing up at 85degrees, takes forever for the old girl to budge.
    > I need to be a bit less "acrobatic" on the s-turns. I really like carving them back and forth tight, but too tight I guess. I do get the wind corrections right though.
    > First ever power off 180's. Did two, landed really nice on the first :) On the second (different airport) the runway was totally covered in snow and ice so did a go around just above the runway. I commented that I might have landed beside it on the grass instead since the runway was so short, covered in ice, goes downhill slightly and has a big pit at the end (sounds like its from a movie!).
    > Biggest flub on the mock check ride was mixing up the "divert" airport. I knew where I was going but in the rush to locate it, picked a much bigger airport about 15 miles just beyond it. I did catch my mistake in time to make a correction turn and reach the runway before my "partial power" scenario would have me on the ground - whew!
    > Only other flub was after returning from the divert airport I was still on their Unicom. I did catch it prior to 5miles out from our landing. CFI said he was waiting for that.
    > Spent a couple of hours going over what to expect on the check ride day. Feels nice to really be focusing on this now.
    > Aborted flying Saturday. Ceilings were 2300agl. Could have done some flying but it was also ever so lightly snowing. Between lack of altitude, the cold and obvious visible moisture I called the flight. Even if there wouldn't have been any other concerns such as turning to heavy snow, I just knew the old 182 would be making carb ice in those conditions.
    > Was going to fly it to the avionics shop today. Aborted again. Solid overcast over entire hop at 1700agl. Would be flying solo. At ~30 miles I know it could easily be done and have even flown in much lower ceilings with first instructor (summer, SVFR clearance on one occasion) but with the perfect cold and carb ice potential, there just isn't enough time to deal with it. So the turn coordinator fix will be delayed now a bit. Hopefully the plane will be available again by the end of the week.
    > The plan for the next flight is another full mock check ride. We will add having to quickly and manually re-plot and re-compute a diversion to another airport vs just doing it with a gadget. In others words, cockpit resource management. I'm pretty good at the re-calculations...more worried about altitude management while drawing lines, measuring angles and messing with paperwork. It will work out.
     
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  32. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 34 (~95hrs)
    > Short Version: 6 days bad wx, 2nd Mock Check ride

    > The first 6 days of the week had low ceilings so no flying.
    > The plane was in the avionics shop getting the Turn Coordinator fixed so at least something productive was happening during the wx break.
    > Got in one day of flying...second mock checkride.
    > Had this crazy headwind and then tailwind..first time I've had a 200mph+ level cruise ground speed.
    > Nailed my 3rd power off 180. CFI was positive I would overshoot. Dumped all 40 flaps, mega slipped and landed in first quarter of the runway with a crappy 80deg cross wind to top it off. I like power off 180's. I bet I would be terrible if I had to do it in another plane as I only have a sense for it in this one plane.
    > My soft field was a bit hard, gust knocked me down on short final so sped up and then felt I had to chop power to land. Should have went around.
    > S-Turns and turns about a point were going awesome, especially with this weird wind. Really steep bank angles (fun!).
    > Still trying to manage the cluster 'F' of (while flying) trying to plot a new course, measure distance, determine heading, re-compute time and fuel. I thought I had my cockpit mgmt. all figured out. Still working on it. I hate have to mess with a sectional while flying.
    > Probably the last flight until after the holidays. Fingers crossed the next one will be the last mock check ride.
    > Good news, even though we're quite a drive from downtown my CFI asked the DPE if would drive out and he will so at least things will be more familiar to me. Plus the little airport building is nice and warm and dead quiet.
    > A guy at the airport just received his Cardinal so had to stop and say hi. Wow did he seem happy!
     
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  33. 455 Bravo Uniform

    455 Bravo Uniform Pattern Altitude

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    455 Bravo Uniform
    For plotting an alt course, my thumb width equaled a certain distance/time/fuel. I used my pen to point in the direction I needed to go and then slid it parallel to the nearest VOR rose to get my new heading.
     
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  34. Jared V

    Jared V Filing Flight Plan

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    I make marks on a pencil to measure distance. Drop the pencil on the chart, measure and move it to a rose for heading.
     
  35. Ravioli

    Ravioli Final Approach

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    Sounds like you're almost done! Excellent.
     
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  36. exncsurfer

    exncsurfer Pattern Altitude

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    I didn't even have a mock check ride, sounds like you'll be well prepared.
     
  37. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 35 (~95hrs)
    > Short Version: No flights (Work, Colonoscopy, Negative Temps, Holidays)

    > The week started with a work emergency...but it pays the bills.
    > For a little added excitement, a night of binge drinking Golytely followed by a morning of things being placed where things do not belong :nono:
    > Of course the colonoscopy was on the one of the 2nd nicest day this week before the temps plunged below zero.
    > And of course, I didn't schedule a flight for the day after the big event which just happened to be nicest and last warm day before the temps plunged below zero. I wanted to play it safe as I had no idea how lasting the Versed drug is. I actually asked the doctor to use as little as possible so I never went under. I think I was fully recovered that same evening. But why fly right after having ya butt probed!
    > Then it got cold (-20F one night, -15F last night).
    > Had a great time up at the cabin over Xmas with the whole family together.
    > Slight possibility of another lesson this week but forecast is showing some snow and more below-zero lows and below-zero to near zero highs. The 182 heater is awesome but doing lots of idle -> full power cycles isn't my first choice. Nice thing about cowl flaps in this cold...pretty much keeping them closed except on takeoff and even now that might not be needed.
    > Coldest flight of my lessons so far was +4F when I started the plane. The night before that flight was -12F, tannis plugged in all night and 45min of pre-heat in the cabin worked out good. The worst is the preflight, the 5-10 minutes after starting the plane while it warms up and re-fueling afterwards.
     
  38. Stephen Shore

    Stephen Shore Pre-takeoff checklist

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    You should have flown right after your colonoscopy - you would have noticed a slight but noticeable improvement in airplane performance. Of course you would need to recalculate your W&B for that day.
     
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  39. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 36 (~95hrs)
    > Short Version: No flights Too Cold, Nose Strut Low

    > Well, the ceilings have cleared up nicely...too nicely...now IT IS COLD. Negative temps even for highs.
    > I set my own limit for now of being 0F or above to start the plane. Its mainly due to warming things up properly and some apprehension regarding water vs. fuel vs. cold temps.
    > Seeing a possible relief in the cold later this week, I went to check on the plane. The nose strut was pretty much all the way collapsed. I'm not seeing any hydraulic fluid but the pavement is so grungy from the previous owner that I just can't be sure. Is it even possible to fully collapse and still have the fluid in it? And now I can't remember if I need to remove the lower cowling or just the top cowling to air it up.
    > To make things even worse, when I weighted the tail to check the nose strut I shattered the tail stinger :( It didn't even get away from me, it was -11F and I was ever so slowly pushing it down. I have 4 bags of rock salt in back so if it does get away from me it will rest under the tail on the aluminum section. But this summer they redid the gravel floor and when they put everything back it was about 2 feet farther back than it was. I was lowering it so slowly that I thought I was hearing the aluminum resting on the bag but it was actually the plastic cracking. Right now its all taped up, looks like a second grader did it.
    > Since I crossed into the new year, I bought the 2018 FAR/AIM and am now re-highlighting everything to be ready for the checkride.
    > Noticed a interesting thing 14 CFR 43. The owner can not re-install the DME. We pulled ours to get it tested/repaired later this year. I figured I would have them repair it and just re-insert it. Nope. Is this because it is IFR equipment or specifically because it is microwave based?
    > Unfortunately, our Twin Cities sectional expires on Jan 4th, so have to order more of those now too.
    > Was nice to spend time with my daughter and wife.
    > So throw in a plane issue or two, lots of cold, FAA docs expiring and this feels like a 3 steps back week. But I ain't giving up yet!
     
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  40. Sinistar

    Sinistar Cleared for Takeoff

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    Update: Week 37 (~97hrs)
    > Short Version: Aired Up Nose Strut & So-So Mock Check ride after 3wks no flying

    Owner Stuff:
    > Knowing it would be nice Sunday, I froze my arse off first on Saturday and figured out how to air up the nose strut.
    > Probably would be easier with the lower cowling off but I managed with just removing the top cowling. A couple sliced up knuckles from some sharp edges and -11F at the time (that part was not fun). I realized my arm was just long enough. But too big to fit unless I took off the jacket (that was the cold part). And then the nice chuck I use for tires got stuck in there. So that was another 45 minutes of slowly and carefully getting it out without wrecking the valve and finding another chuck that wouldn't get stuck and still fit.
    > My taped up tail stinger "project" seemed to work nice. Even though there only about 10 screws holding it on, I had to remove the overlapping side panels as well and then slowly tighten everything so I didn't crack it again. Wouldn't have been a concern in the summer.
    > Finally have a nice method for getting the tail down. I have 3 x 60lb sand tubes and a cheap grippy yoga mat cut in two. Put a mat down on each side of the elevator just where it meets the empennage. Put one sand tube on each side on the mat. The tail still won't come down! Put the third bag and on it's ready to go. Then crawl under the tail and pull it all the way down. I have a loop around two bags of rock salt. Hook it and then remove the 3rd sand bag. Now its not going anywhere.
    > If this nose strut thing is going to more frequent I am thinking of buying a old heavy duty floor jack. Throw a bunch of dumb bells on it, jack it up, hook it and slowly let off the pressure and pull the tail down only via the hook.

    Pilot Stuff:
    > I was mega rusty after 3wks off!!!!
    > First, forgot my tablet but that's okay, flew the flight plan the normal way include the divert.
    > Second, forgot to mount the CO detector too (not good). I always put both in the cockpit at the same time after preflight. It was onboard in the bag, but that doesn't do much good now does it.
    > Was able to quickly draw out the new course, get the course, figure out the times, fuel, etc. That felt good.
    > One thing I had done earlier on the sectional was write down the runway directions for each airport along my path. That saved me from digging through the chart supplement when getting overloaded.
    > My instructor is having me demonstrate slow flight much more aggressively so another new to me thing. The first instructor would have me flying around 50mph indicated where max flaps stall speed is 54mph. The stall horning is occasionally chirping. For the new instructor he is having me fly at right around 42-44mph with the stall horn constantly chirping. So kind of re-learning here. I'm still good at altitude and turns, just finding a new normal threw me off.
    > So we flew almost 2hrs and my first landing after 3wks was a short field. I landed long after it dropped out on short final and added power. Should have done a go around. Funny, had it been an actual short field I absolutely know I would have went around. But I guess I wanted to save it and just get it done.
    > I had asked to avoid landing away from the home airport just in case the nose strut had deflated otherwise My first landing probably would have been after about 25min of flying. I still would have been rusty but I think I would have done better getting in "first" landing a bit sooner.

    Lessons Learned:
    1.) If it's been awhile, especially at my novice level now....dedicate the first flight to some simple pattern work
    2.) Since I had done work on the plane I should have dedicated the first flight to verification of the work.
    3.) When you forget something even non-essential (ie gadget), yes you can continue on but now the routine is off. I should have just went back and got it. Since this flight involved a albeit lengthy cross country (MN->SD), that's what I would have done if it were real.
    4.) Stop trying to rush this check ride, that would have avoided #1,#2,#3
    5.) Get help when working on the plane, especially a first new type of maintenance.
    6.) It is now time to establish my personal minimums list.