IFR ground before flight time

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Georgeyk17, Jan 15, 2020.

  1. Georgeyk17

    Georgeyk17 Pre-Flight

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    so I’m stuck at home with some time to kill (healing from an injury). I’ve been planning to start my IFR training for a while so I’m wondering if it’s ok to do the ground work before the flight time? I did some practice test through Sheppards and it’s pretty simple methodology for passing the test but will it all make sense and come together when I start flying with my instructor. I really want to be safe and understand what I’m learning. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down PoA Supporter

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    IFR is a lot of reading and memorization. Shouldn’t be a big problem to study it anytime.
     
  3. RingLaserGyroSandwich

    RingLaserGyroSandwich Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I would not start with Sheppard. Use a textbook or other resource designed to actually teach you the material first.
     
  4. Jim Carpenter

    Jim Carpenter Pre-takeoff checklist

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    This for sure.

    Nothing wrong with starting your ground studies prior to flight training. In general, it may be better to do flight and ground concurrently, and perhaps more so with PPL training, but it can certainly work either way. And, I think that would be a great way to keep your head in the game while laid up, away from actual flying.
    You'll definitely want to get started with a real course of study, textbook, video/online, whatever. Sheppard (and others like that) is great for a final "cram" as a finish-up prep for taking the test, but will not provide the depth of knowledge needed.
    If you know where/who you will train with already, you might contact the school and/or instructors to find out their preferred "brand" of ground materials, it would make your entry into the flight training easier. Without that, any of the available instrument rating courses should be fine. The FAA materials, available free online, Instrument Flying Handbook and Instrument Procedures Handbook, along with weather publications, are of course the fundamental basis for any private brand training materials, but may lack the "extra" guidance and structure (like chapter quizzes or progress-tracking) that other courses provide to aid the self-study student.
     
  5. dreyna14

    dreyna14 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    I took and passed my written three days before officially starting my flight training for the IR. While you don't have to have all the knowledge, it sure helps when your instructor puts you into a situation or asks you a question in the air about an approach or other requirement. I figure the more time spent learning on the ground means less time fumbling in the air.
     
  6. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    The original "I don't know it all" of aviation.
    I also agree with this.

    Using one of the various textbooks or video learning systems out there will provide the background knowledge you need to put the questions into context. So when you do start in with SheppardAir to learn the test, it will have the side benefit of reinforcing some of the knowledge material.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2020
  7. lancie00

    lancie00 Line Up and Wait

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    I agree. If you're just starting the learning, go get King or Sporty's or ??? and actually LEARN what you need to know. You can always go back to Shepard if you have trouble with the test.
     
  8. Georgeyk17

    Georgeyk17 Pre-Flight

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    Thanks guys. I'm leaning toward the KingSchool course to get started. Also talking to my old training school Chief to see if I might be able to do some simulartor work. Thanks again.
     
  9. Ravioli

    Ravioli Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Use Gold Method.

    And contrary to the others, there's nothing wrong with drill and kill for the written. You then have two years to learn what you need for the checkride.
     
  10. RingLaserGyroSandwich

    RingLaserGyroSandwich Pre-takeoff checklist

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    When you drill and kill for the written without actually learning the material first, your brain makes incorrect assumptions as it associates facts and phrases together to aid in memorizing answers. These incorrect assumptions lead to deep misconceptions. Once you learn something incorrectly, you cannot unlearn it. All you can do is “pave over” the incorrect knowledge with correct information, but the effects of poorly learned concepts will linger throughout your flying career. Drill and kill should be the last step towards taking the written, not the first or only step.
     
  11. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down PoA Supporter

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    This really depends on HOW you drill and kill.

    If you read the reference material behind each question when even the question doesn’t seem to make sense, and learn the reason for the answer as you go along, a drill and kill app can be useful.

    But it’s very dependent on your approach to it.
     
  12. Deelee

    Deelee Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Bought the sporty's course and also the Jeppesen textbook prior to starting IFR training with my CFII... But we had worked out that we are going to use the Jepp syllabus in advance so you might want to see what your CFII recommends. Also read the IFH and the IPH (wow is that one dry...) as well. Free from the government.

    Both the sporty's videos and the Jepp book were highly useful. Learning the procedures, which instruments are primary/secondary for types of maneuvers, how to scan, SID, en-route, STAR and approach charts (and the procedures associated with each)... all highly useful before going under the hood.
     
  13. luvflyin

    luvflyin Final Approach PoA Supporter

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    Yes.