How many of you have had an engine failure?

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by Ryanb, Aug 31, 2014.

  1. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Messages:
    8,496
    Location:
    Other side of the world
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Rotor&Wing
    The majority of mechanical failures can be attributed to lack of maintenance. Unfortunately GA has a big problem with this, starting with cheap owners and compounded with A&P's and IA's that will sell their signatures.
     
  2. funkster9

    funkster9 Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    76
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Robert Funk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbqDTuAQoi4

    October, 2012.

    Collapsed lifters (3) on takeoff. Why three at that time with a fine preflight/runup? Who knows.

    Mechanic said probably could've firewalled it, held my 200ft agl and come around to land. Also said there was a chance the camshaft would've gotten banged up and/or thrown a rod. Anyhoo, the field was always my number one.

    I re-live that day with every takeoff I have made since that day almost 2 years ago.

    Ps: Nowdays, I use the clip from a guy who hijacked my upload. He somehow is up to 800K+ views compared to the 70K of my original. Go figure!!
     
  3. Ryanb

    Ryanb Final Approach PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Messages:
    5,735
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Ryan
    Wow! Ive seen your video several times, you did an excellent job man! Thanks for sharing!
     
  4. MickYoumans

    MickYoumans Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    2J5 / KBXG - Georgia
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    MickYoumans
    I've been flying since the early 80's. I can't say that I ever had a serious engine failure. I did experience a sticky valve though in my first airplane, a Cessna 150M. My gas burn rate went to crap and my power dropped off a bit. Carbon had built up around one of the valve stems.

    I just had a major engine overhaul done on my Cherokee. I'm up to 11 hours so far on the new engine and everything seems to be running great so far. With the statistics I've read, infant mortality is still a concern for a while yet.
     
  5. Lord Muck

    Lord Muck Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2014
    Messages:
    50
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Mr Muck
    Yep. A disturbingly large percentage of the GA fleet is owned by people who can't really afford to maintain them properly.
     
  6. Z06_Mir

    Z06_Mir Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,529
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Radna
    Details on the MU2 prop failure?
     
  7. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Messages:
    8,496
    Location:
    Other side of the world
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Rotor&Wing
    A sad truth...:nonod:
     
  8. dans2992

    dans2992 En-Route

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    3,062
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dans2992
    What do you think of Mike Busch's "Savvy Maintenance Service?"

    Right now, one of my mechanically inclined partners interfaces with the shop, but if I were to go on my own, I want to make sure the plane is well maintained. However I would not want the shop taking advantage of me or recommending unnecessary procedures.
     
  9. 1600vw

    1600vw Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Messages:
    2,004
    Location:
    Central IL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    H.A.S.
    Why I do not fly GA. I will not spare any expense in maintaining my EAB. I will go hungry or not fly until its mechanically in good shape. I know what I can afford and a GA airplane I can not afford. The Annual inspection would break me or empty my bank account and leave me divorced.


    Great now we are on a Mike Bush bash. I found most A&P's do not like him. I wonder why? :rolleyes: I have learned a lot from him.

    I have never found an A&P who would just sign things wanting his pockets lined for doing it. Just the opposite I have found. A&P's are scared to death of anything, just ask one to do a Condition inspection on a EAB and you will see this fear for yourself.

    I will never understand this. Never in history has an A&P been sued over a Condition Inspection on a EAB. That would be tough to do for all the A&P is saying when signing this is, this airplane is what the FAA says it is, in a safe condition for operation.

    Nothing more or nothing less. mention this to an A&P and stand back.

    Tony
     
  10. Kiddo's Driver

    Kiddo's Driver Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Fayetteville, TN
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jim
    I get what you are saying, but EAB is part of GA...
     
  11. Jimmy cooper

    Jimmy cooper En-Route

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2013
    Messages:
    4,327
    Location:
    Baltimore md.
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jim cooper
    I think this is very accurate. Include lazy mechanics with the " awwww shucks, it just needs fly'in approach. " other problems I encountered were an excellent mechanic and AI who I trusted to work on my plane, left it with him feeling very confident. Returned to find his drug addicted son had done the work. Lousy job and close call going over the Chesapeake bay on the way home, it missed badly. I paid him but never went back. Cessna 195. (It had a bad wiring harness that never got checked. ) another mechanic found it immed, replaced it. )
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014
  12. 1600vw

    1600vw Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Messages:
    2,004
    Location:
    Central IL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    H.A.S.

    Not according to the FAA. I could start spouting all the differences but I believe we all know them. But here are a few

    General Aviation "GA" needs Annual Inspection

    Experimental home built EAB needs a Condition Inspection.

    GA airplane is airworthy

    EAB is not airworthy even though it has an airworthy certificate. Nothing about an EAB is airworthy. In the logs it states for safe operation.

    I could go on but you are wrong..An EAB is not an General Aviation airplane.

    Tony
     
  13. Jimmy cooper

    Jimmy cooper En-Route

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2013
    Messages:
    4,327
    Location:
    Baltimore md.
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jim cooper
    I think a big problem is the Cuba syndrome. Old engines, old cranks, old carbs, on and on. We are using aircraft that are as old as the 1950 Chevys and ply mouths one sees on tv running in Cuba. When you put the coal to some of these old engines, they quit or come apart ( like in takeoff) leaving the pilot with bad choices in most instances. Couple that with idiotic mistakes made over and over again , running out of gas, bad weather, stalling in the pattern, on and on. In the faa monthly accident reports, lots of quitting on takeoff reports!
     
  14. brian]

    brian] Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    1,473
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    brian]
    This brings me to a question I've had for a while:
    - I DO have an antique, and I fly it that way.
    - At what point does an aircraft BECOME an antique?
     
  15. Kiddo's Driver

    Kiddo's Driver Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Fayetteville, TN
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jim
    http://www.faa.gov/aircraft/gen_av/
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Kiddo's Driver

    Kiddo's Driver Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,400
    Location:
    Fayetteville, TN
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jim
    The Kansas tax laws say 25 years old...
     
  17. LDJones

    LDJones Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2011
    Messages:
    10,904
    Location:
    Twin Cities, MN
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jonesy
    If you take all the anecdotes mentioned here and divide them into the total hours flown by all the posters here, you'll find serious problems still are relatively rare. How many incidents did the 22,000 hour guy have? A half dozen....none catastrophic? Seems like not a lot to worry about.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014
  18. evapilotaz

    evapilotaz Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Messages:
    2,414
    Location:
    Gilbert AZ. VFR All Year Baby
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Drone airspace abuser
    What is EAB? Is that Experimental amateur build airplane?
     
  19. Dead Stick

    Dead Stick Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    Left Front Seat
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dead Stick
    It had just come out of overhaul and something in the hub broke. There was an AD issued as a result. I was flying a MU-2B-60 Marquise and when we got on the ramp, I could take my hand and rotate each blade lock to lock. Unbelievably, there was no engine damage, but the airframe couldn't care less why the engine is not producing thrust.

    I also left one off of the SE piston failures...

    Back in 1976, I had the opportunity to go pick up a brand spanking new C182 at the Cessna delivery center in Wichita. On climb out, out of 5,000 feet, the engine started to run extremely rough. I declared an emergency and returned the d@mn thing back to Cessna. They had it for another day before I was able to leave.

    Which brings up the point, most (80%?) of my inflight issues have occurred with new airplanes or new engines or recent major maintenance performed by factory service centers. The 737-40 precautionary shutdown was on a brand new airplane that had only been on the property one week.

    My aviation mentor one told me that the most dangerous flying you'll ever do is in brand-new equipment or just out of major maintenance. I have come to know that he was bang on.

    NEVER let your guard down. Fly safely, my friends.
     
  20. Capt. Geoffrey Thorpe

    Capt. Geoffrey Thorpe Final Approach

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,944
    Location:
    DXO124009
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Light and Sporty Guy
    yes..
     
  21. weirdjim

    weirdjim En-Route

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    Messages:
    3,283
    Location:
    Grass Valley, CA (KGOO)
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    weirdjim
    And mine told me NEVER to fly the A model of ANYTHING.

    Jim
     
  22. evapilotaz

    evapilotaz Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Messages:
    2,414
    Location:
    Gilbert AZ. VFR All Year Baby
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Drone airspace abuser
    Thanks.
     
  23. Z06_Mir

    Z06_Mir Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,529
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Radna
    Thanks for the explanation. I am always curious, partially because of the history of the MU2 and partially because I grew up in a South Dakota aviation family and This crash was often talked about, even in the late 90's.


    I am slightly anxious/nervous to fly my airplane next. It will have a new engine and prop. I've been paranoid about the first flight since the choice was made that it was engine time. I'll probably give up flying at night for 100 hours or so too.
     
  24. brian]

    brian] Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2014
    Messages:
    1,473
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    brian]
    But I fly a V1.0 (pre A35 model) Bonanza ... (Ok, with nearly 70 years of mods).

    Maintenance is important. So is reading and following the POH (with training).

    But yea, if I purchased a new 1.0 model, I would want a chute ...
     
  25. Henning

    Henning Ejection Handle Pulled

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Messages:
    39,482
    Location:
    Ft Lauderdale FL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    iHenning
    If it's like cars, 25years, boats are typically 50. I don't consider any Bo or plane designed post WWII as an antique though because there has been no technological change to the plane. You might have antique radios, but you have a modern airframe, and in aircraft parlance, a modern engine.
     
  26. Jay Honeck

    Jay Honeck Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,394
    Location:
    Port Aransas, TX
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jay Honeck
    Sad, but true.
     
  27. Dead Stick

    Dead Stick Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    Left Front Seat
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dead Stick
    The pilot of that airplane was a good friend of mine and we had flown together on several occasions. He was a very experienced and competent pilot. My incident happened shortly after that crash and resulted in an emergency AD on that prop and engine combination. There is no other way to say it, I was d@mn lucky that night.

    You don't need to be paranoid about your new engine/propeller, just be extra alert for a few hours - some problems take time to develop. As for flying at night in a SE airplane, there's a reason why many highly experienced pilots choose not to take that risk. My history explains why I choose not to. It's not a question of if it's going to quit, only a matter of when. There's no good reason to run up your risks by flying at night if it's not necessary.
     
    Brad Smith likes this.
  28. VictorValencia

    VictorValencia Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2014
    Messages:
    80
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    VictorValencia
    How do you determine:

    1) that a mag failed?
    2) which one failed?

    I'm a student and I would love to learn how to deal with such a situation.
    I had what I thought was a bad mag during my run-up but it turned out
    to be a fouled plug. It was with my instructor and very educational.
     
  29. txflyer

    txflyer En-Route

    Joined:
    May 3, 2013
    Messages:
    4,508
    Location:
    Wild Blue Yonder
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Fly it like you STOL it ♦

    Turn ignition key to right mag, engine runs. Turn it to left engine quits.

    Left mag bad. :dunno:
     
  30. Jaybird180

    Jaybird180 Final Approach

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    8,854
    Location:
    Near DC
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jaybird180
    Nall report says the stats are only marginally higher.
    There is no boogey man
     
  31. Z06_Mir

    Z06_Mir Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2012
    Messages:
    1,529
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Radna
    I'm sorry to hear that was your friend. Although it was long before my time, I do know several people that know that group. That's why I asked about the details of your MU2 incident. I do know that the SD State pilots would still love to fly MU2's instead of the King Air's. Good group of guys still.


    I flew at night fairly often, at least when I had the time. I really, really enjoy it. In Phoenix it's quiet and you can actually see traffic which is a nice change of pace from the hectic practice areas. But for a few months I do realize it's best to give up those wonderful night flights. I plan on getting some time on the new engine as quickly as possible so I can get back to normal. I really trusted the old engine, but we found evidence that overhauling was an excellent decision. 1800 hours and 33 years isn't too shabby
     
  32. Dead Stick

    Dead Stick Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    Left Front Seat
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dead Stick
    Go ahead a believe whatever you want.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2014
  33. Dead Stick

    Dead Stick Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2012
    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    Left Front Seat
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Dead Stick
    The "A" model of anything doesn't bother me. But you can expect to run into "teething problems" anytime you are involved with the first 50 serial numbers of any new design. It takes a while for the folks on the floor to figure out how they are supposed to put them together.