Grand Canyon fly overs as a Sport Pilot?

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by rtk11, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. rtk11

    rtk11 Line Up and Wait

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    Riddle me this, POAers...

    If you’re a Sport Pilot, can you fly through some of the corridors through the Special Flight Rules Areas at the Grand Canyon? I understand that it’s at 11,500 altitude northbound, and 10,500 southbound.

    To add to the question: If you are ADS-B equipped, will this be an automatic identifier that you’ve violated Sport Pilot rules when flying through these corridors?

    Of course all this is hypothetical...
     
  2. rk911

    rk911 Pre-takeoff checklist

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    a Sport Pilot may fly up to 10,000 feet above mean sea level (MSL) or 2,000 feet above ground level (AGL), whichever is higher.
     
  3. Pilawt

    Pilawt Final Approach

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    There are areas of the SFRA where flight is only restricted below 8,000 or 9,000 MSL. The Tuckup Corridor is in one of the areas where flight is restricted below 9,000. In that case I don’t know whether you could legally transit the corridor lower than the published altitudes, say at 9,500.

    The published corridor altitudes are confusing when you use the Tuckup Corridor, because they are the opposite of the usual hemispheric-rule cruising altitudes for the magnetic courses of that particular corridor. They want you at 10,500’ or 12,500’ on a 168° course, and at 11,500’ or 13,500’ on a 348° course.

    As for your second question, I don’t think the ADS-B tag alone would be a red flag. A private pilot can fly an LSA above 10,000’, and the ADS-B tag doesn’t show what type of certificate the PIC has.