F33 Transition Training

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Vaughn DeCoster, Feb 17, 2021.

  1. Vaughn DeCoster

    Vaughn DeCoster Filing Flight Plan

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Vaughn
    Looking to move into a F33 and was curious what kind of transition training insurance may require. I’ve got 2,100 TT, IFR rated, with zero Beech time but plenty in a SR20, C182, C172, C150,;PA28, and a LongEZ. Working on my commercial just because.

    Thanks!

    Vaughn
     
  2. GRG55

    GRG55 Final Approach

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,196
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Aztec Flyer
    Could be as low as 10 hours. Or maybe up to 25 hours due to your limited retract time.
    That's the typical bookends I've experienced.

    Nice airplanes those F33s. Pictures please if you go that route!
     
  3. Groundpounder

    Groundpounder Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    2,098
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Heywood Jablowme
    My insurance required zero, despite no bonanza time. I found that odd.

    Not sure if you've done it yet, but join the American Bonanza Society. Tons of great resources available to members, and you'll be able to find an instructor familiar with the Bonanza very easily.
     
    Jim Carpenter likes this.
  4. mondtster

    mondtster En-Route

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Messages:
    3,327
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    mondtster
    I haven’t kept a finger on the pulse of Bonanza insurance since I sold mine, but I’d take most of the answers you get with a grain of salt unless they are very recent. The insurance landscape has changed considerably in the last year or so. If you have a broker you've been working with you might call them and ask a generic question about what to expect for premiums and required training.
     
  5. schmookeeg

    schmookeeg Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,258
    Location:
    Hipsterdelphia PDX
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Mike Brannigan
    I've been doing a lot of transitions in Bonanzas lately. The insurance market has been punitive. I have some guys who got hit with 30, something I hadn't seen before (30 is a TON and honestly hard to fill the time unless you aim at a new rating -- 10 is reasonable for a Bonanza IMHO). I have a 12,000 rotor-wing ATP/CFI-H who had a few hundred retract/fixed wing get hit with 25 hours. It's a bit gonzo out there at the moment.

    I'd plan on getting smacked with 25 hours, and then kiss your broker if you get less.
     
    mondtster likes this.
  6. Salty

    Salty Final Approach

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Messages:
    7,732
    Location:
    FL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Salty
    One way to reduce the pain is to find someone who owns the same type and has an IR and fly some safety pilot for him / her. Lets them keep up their currency and costs you less or nothing. If you can find such a person....
     
    AKBill likes this.
  7. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2007
    Messages:
    20,100
    Location:
    Catawba, NC
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    FlyingRon
    When I got the Navion, there was no insurance requirement. In fact, I was fairly low time, no instrument rating, and I only got my HP/complex sign off in anticipation of going out to test fly the plane.
    Of course this was in 1995.

    My actual training was me and the instructor (who fortunately was the same guy who did my HP/complex training in the Arrow and transitioned me to a lot of the club planes) going over all the procedures in the manual. We then did a bunch of landings which included flight away from the pattern so I could get a feel for the energy management on the approach. Navions aren't as slick as things like Mooneys to slow down, but the gear/flap speed is relatively low (87 KIAS) so you can't just use the gear as a speed brake.

    After being convinced that I could remember to get the gear down and working through the simulated (well and some actual) emergencies he pronounced me competent to his satisfaction.

    The total time was a bit much because it included six or seven hours of us ferrying the plane back from where I bought it.
     
  8. John Collins

    John Collins Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2,431
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    John
    If you really have one of the few F33 that were ever manufactured? They are rare birds, only manufactured in 1970, all 20 of them. They have a maximum GW of 3050 pounds and have the 225 HP engine. Of course, you probably have the F33A has a GW of 3400 pounds and uses an IO520 engine with 285 HP. :).