Carbon Monoxide

Discussion in 'Lessons Learned' started by Rudy, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. Rudy

    Rudy Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    639

    Display name:
    Rudy
    This happened to me a couple of months ago:
    It was the first time i got to fly out of the pattern and i was thrilled. I was over my house which is east of the airport making circles just hoping someone would see i guess. I did about 3 circles or so and leveled out. As i started to head west i became very light headed and started to get tunnel vision. I looked at the detector and sure enough i had carbon monoxide in the cabin. I was about 2 miles east still and started to let down, i then opened the small window on the 140 and tried to breath in the outside air. As i got on final the tunnel vision got worse and it was like looking through a paper towel roll. I had to look funny, landing. One hand on the yoke one on the power and my head turned half sideways breathing in the air and using my peripheral vision to track the runway. I touched down pretty smooth i think ha it didn't matter i was just glad to be back on the ground.

    Good experience though, you can bet that i'm checking that detector every minute or so now
     
  2. EdFred

    EdFred Taxi to Parking

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2005
    Messages:
    27,581
    Location:
    Michigan

    Display name:
    Ed Frederick
    I have a Cherokee 180, and what I will do, no matter how cold it is, is that every few miuntes I will open up the outside air vents to full, and open the little side vent window. Or stick my hand out the side vent window and guide a bunch of fresh outside air in.
     
  3. Mark S

    Mark S Guest

    I have a CO Experts CO detector located on the floor of my plane that provides a digital readout of CO along with an audible alarm when more than 10 ppm ( believe that is correct) of CO is present. It costs around $100 and is well worth the expense IMHO.

    The bigger question to ask is where did your CO come from? Please have your exhaust and heating system checked to make sure it is tight and not leaking. The only time I have gotten CO in my cabin was climbing full rich and had not leaned like I should have.

    Mark
     
  4. Carol

    Carol Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    928
    Location:
    SC

    Display name:
    Carol

    I agree. Make sure you find out where that CO is coming from. The CO detector is well worth the money.

    I had a CO episode returning from a long cross country a couple of years ago. It didn't occur to me at the time what was happening. Only after I got back and began to put things together did I realize the potential danger.

    You were very lucky. CO can take you out quick. Did you have nausea and/or headache? Any other sick feelings?

    Thank goodness you are okay and here to write about it for others to learn from.

    Carol
     
  5. RobertGerace

    RobertGerace Guest

    This is a big concern for me, too. I carry two different detectors. I used to cycle the heat on and off (and open vents/windows when off) but then learned that the instruments won't function properly if cold enough (and also that the pilot won't was well).

    I wish there was some kind of pulse oximeter that would tell you if you have CO in your blood (they won't) -- although I carry one of those as well to make sure I'm never hypoxic (especially when on 02).
     
  6. Rudy

    Rudy Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    639

    Display name:
    Rudy
    Im sorry i didn't add in that we got if fixed. There two holes in the heating system that was allowing it to leak in. We had everything replaced and it works fine now. I still look at though just to make sure. It was my first real scare when i was flying and i wont forget it anytime soon.


    I have also looked in to buying a more expensive one that will yell at me if i have a problem. Its the next thing on my wish list of many.
     
  7. Rudy

    Rudy Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    639

    Display name:
    Rudy
    Just a tad bit of nausea, it would be easy to ignore and think nothing of it. Luckily i looked at the indicator. The real thing that got me was the tunnel vision. It was something else. I felt a little weak after it was all over but im not sure if that was from the CO or the natural high i was on. haha
     
  8. Carol

    Carol Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    928
    Location:
    SC

    Display name:
    Carol

    I'd put it pretty high on the list ;) You are a lucky guy.
     
  9. Diana

    Diana Final Approach

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    6,167
    Location:
    Southwest MO

    Display name:
    Diana
    Rudy, did you hear about the carbon monoxide accident that happened at your airport (PTS) several years ago?

    http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X05374&key=1

    These two were really lucky.
     
  10. gturner

    gturner Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    37
    Location:
    Arkansas

    Display name:
    GJ Turner
    This is the closest thing that is made for CO detection. It is actually a breath test that measures end tidal CO. I'm not sure what they cost though.

    http://www.creativebiomedics.com/Prod_COMonitorDetails.asp

    Gary
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2005
  11. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2005
    Messages:
    11,530
    Location:
    Bolingbrook, IL

    Display name:
    Bruce C
    This one involved the luckiest man alive, an AME from Hoisington, KS. IT is better to be lucky than good, for sure. He was in my initial AME class....

    http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief2.asp?ev_id=20001208X09271&ntsbno=CHI98LA055&akey=1

    What is not in the report is that as he staggered to the nearby farmhouse, he looked so bad that the farmer pulled out his shotgun ("durned druggie"), as the aircraft could not be seen from the house. When the power quit, the Century II AP dialed full pitch up, or minimal sink rate, and maintained wings level (on the electric TC) until impact.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2005
  12. Mark S

    Mark S Guest

    I remember reading about this incident. A Comanche 400 IIRC. Very, very luck to be alive for lots of reasons.

    Mark
     
  13. Carol H

    Carol H Filing Flight Plan

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Messages:
    9

    Display name:
    Carol H

    I just happen to find the underlined information a tad scary.:( It makes me wonder how many inspections are inadequate? :confused:


    Carol H
     
  14. Ken Ibold

    Ken Ibold Final Approach

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,888
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida

    Display name:
    Ken Ibold
    Many, many. And it's more due to the attitudes of owners rather than the mechanics who work on them.

    Most mechanics, as I'm sure Tom D will attest, really want to do the right thing and maintain airplanes to the best of their ability. However, many, many owners get fed up with the cost of maintaining their airplanes and coerce, cajole, intimidate, browbeat and argue with the mechanics to keep the cost down, defer, defer, defer maintenance and otherwise cut corners.

    Then, there are some shops/mechanics that become known for pencil-whipping annuals ... oops, I meant performing "checkbook-friendly" annuals ... until the Feds find out and shut them down. Sadly, these guys are usually extremely busy.

    I have a friend who is a safety inspector at the Orlando FSDO who is an A&P/IA by background. He flew my airplane when it had about 80 hours from the factory. I had done nothing to it, one way or the other, except changing the oil. He said, "that is the closest to a technically airworthy airplane I have ever seen. But ..." and then listed two legal "deficiencies" that had been overlooked at the factory. Maintaining airplanes right is a tough job. My hat's off to mechanics. I couldn't do what they do. I try to make sure "Let's hold off on that" is not part of my maintenance vocabulary.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2005
  15. Rudy

    Rudy Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    639

    Display name:
    Rudy
    Sound like some real close calls. That stuff can be dangerous, im glad i was lucky.
     
  16. Skip Miller

    Skip Miller Final Approach PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,450
    Location:
    New York City

    Display name:
    Skip Miller
    I don't think cracks in muffler and exhaust stacks start and slowly creep across the affected surface. I think they occur bang! with a relatively sudden change in temperature (like applying take off power, holding it for a while) and the stress finally goes beyond the limits of the material to resist it. In other words, without information about other findings that indicate the holes were in fact present for a while, who is to say the A&P's inspection was inadequate? Maybe the holes did not exist when he looked.

    TD if you read this, can you comment? Do holes or cracks in the exhaust occur suddenly or incrementally?

    -Skip
     
  17. Henning

    Henning Ejection Handle Pulled

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2005
    Messages:
    39,481
    Location:
    Ft Lauderdale FL

    Display name:
    iHenning
    More than you imagine. That's one of the reasons I do all my own work. There's only a couple mechanics I trust to work on my stuff...and I can't afford them. One more reason my next plane and probably any that don't need to be certified aircraft will be homebuilt. I really want to build a LanceAir 360, gotta find the time....
     
  18. gismo

    gismo Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    12,672
    Location:
    Minneapolis

    Display name:
    iGismo
    Quite suddenly, if you hit "off" during your mag check and switch back on before the engine stops. I'd wager that this kind of thing is high on the list of causes for sudden exhaust failures.
     
  19. maximus

    maximus Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Illinois

    Display name:
    MAXIMUS
    I am surprised, with the way the heater systems are designed, that carbon monoxide detectors are not mandatory equipment. I personally would feel better if airplanes had em. I guess that is what I get for not being able to afford my own plane and being able to install safety equipment.

    Maxwell
     
  20. gismo

    gismo Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    12,672
    Location:
    Minneapolis

    Display name:
    iGismo
    A portable CO alarm is every bit as effective as a built in one, so rental's shouldn't be an issue.

    http://www.aeromedix.com/?_siteid=a...2ad5990f0ae39cbf5ba4afc77&action=sku&sku=coex