Can a US pilot work in the UK?

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Travel360, Jun 20, 2019.

  1. Travel360

    Travel360 Filing Flight Plan

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    I was wondering if a US pilot can be hired at an airline in the UK. I personally prefer the lifestyle in Europe over the US. The UK has very strict immigration policies though.
     
  2. Doc Holliday

    Doc Holliday Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Sure.

    However it will require a conversion of his US ATP to a British CAA certificate. And it's not a paperwork exchange, it's a long involved process.
     
  3. hindsight2020

    hindsight2020 En-Route

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    In general the answer is no. As has been alluded to, the process of expatriation for work is very restrictive, especially in the more desirable Countries of North/West Europe. I hear ya on the lifestyle; though I admit I couldn't afford GA in Europe, I envy their social liberalism. American public culture is too puritanical and self-segregating for my taste. Alas, I have extended family to mind and Lord knows they're socioeconomically stuck in the US, so moving is not in the cards for me. Well... that and that little pesky detail of my current indentured servitude to his Majesty's War Department, but I digress. :D

    My biggest beef with the FAA is exactly what you allude to. We give our licensing away for nothing, and for that layup we get zero work reciprocity back with our neighbors to the South or Western Europe. It's a complete checkers move, meant to incentivize foreigners to train here, while American pilots fight for scraps domestically (e.g. waaaaaay more pilot aspirants than flying jobs with the incomes people actually get into pro flying in order to get in the first place.). There's no pilot shortage, only shortage for non-career flying jobs nobody wants in the first place. I also have a bone to pick with the concept of people being allowed to hold dual citizenship, but that's admittedly a playa hata stance on my part, and one I have no compunction allocuting to.
     
  4. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 En-Route

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    Is it "work" if you're being paid to fly? ;)
     
  5. neilki

    neilki Pre-Flight

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    CAA? Yes. Don't forget the time machine.. :)

    1) The UK follows EASA licensing rules (European Licensing Authority)
    2) The UK is leaving Europe (Not my idea..)

    Have a look at PPRune. You're up for $50k; 14 exams and a year of your life. Look into the handful of US schools authorized to train to EASA standards.
    Then start again, as once the UK leaves the EU your license becomes worthless..
    Honestly not a good time to convert. Can you legally work in the UK?
     
  6. Tarheelpilot

    Tarheelpilot En-Route

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    It’s a lot easier for UK pilots to work here.