C177 down Whidbey Island (W10)

Discussion in 'Aviation Mishaps' started by DavidWhite, Nov 12, 2020.

  1. MountainDude

    MountainDude Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Please read your source before you spread misinformation: "The pilots attempted to deploy the ballistic parachute just before the forced landing, however, due to the low altitude, it did not fully deploy."
     
  2. Witmo

    Witmo Pattern Altitude

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    Did you read the commercial pilot's statement included in the NTSB report referenced by Ryan? Here's an excerpt: "...When the plane came to a halt, I made my move to get out. I told him to get out with me as I unbuckled my seatbelt and opened my door. As I began to throw my body out the side, the plane jerked back and whipped me out. The plane rolled over my body and lifted enough to avoid crushing my head. I again passed out. When I came back, I could still hear the crashing of the plane and could see the parachute. I found my way to my feet and I followed the noise and trail of debris. The plane traveled 1. 7 miles when it got stuck on a barbwired fence, with Don still in it." The parachute did drag the plane and ended up in a barbed wire fence. The terrain wasn't too bad and they both might have survived a forced landing if they hadn't pulled the chute or they both might have survived if they had pulled the chute earlier. I'm not a soothsayer but I agree with Ryan on this one--BRS can be a lifesaver but it isn't a substitute for good ADM.
     
  3. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 En-Route

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    I know somebody who was particularly knowledgeable with what happened NTSB report or not. I was also flying a Pipistrel with that individual, and was additionally flying another BRS equipped aircraft (An Apollo Fox) down at 5C1 and we had several discussions about our particular BRS deployment perimeters as a result of that accident. If it's high surface winds and I still have control of an SLSA, I would probably take my chances with a landing into the wind... you still need good judgement.
     
  4. MountainDude

    MountainDude Pre-takeoff checklist

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    Of course you need good judgment, and of course a BRS is not a substitute for ADM.
    However, these two pilots would very likely be alive today if their plane had BRS.
     
  5. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 En-Route

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    I'm generally a fan. When I had access to the light sport plane equipped with BRS, I found myself taking students on night flights in that aircraft even if we had access to a 172, because I felt it gave us more options in the Texas Hill Country. I'm no BRS hater, trust me.
     
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  6. woodchucker

    woodchucker Pattern Altitude

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    Was flying under the hood over Wyoming once and experienced a drop of rpm and obvious engine roughness. Gave the controls over to my safety pilot and we worked the problem. Carb heat was the first thought and action, including experimenting with some altitude deviations and other in-cockpit checks. In retrospect we felt we did experience carb ice. Definitely a learning experience.
     
  7. Witmo

    Witmo Pattern Altitude

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    Just curious. Do the BRS installed in aircraft have a way of disconnecting the parachute harness from the cockpit once on the ground to prevent getting dragged? In the F-111 we had a number of handles that needed to be pulled once on the ground and one of them blew the bolts connecting the harness.
     
  8. hindsight2020

    hindsight2020 En-Route

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    No.
     
  9. Kenny Phillips

    Kenny Phillips En-Route

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    No. A recent Cirrus pull has brought this up: some sort of cord-cutter to prevent dragging could be useful if it can be 100% failsafe locked out.
     
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  10. PeterNSteinmetz

    PeterNSteinmetz Pattern Altitude PoA Supporter

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    A bit more on this crash, from Frederick Lundahl at Cardinal Flyers Organization Community (members only):

    "My flying student was just putting away our a/c and witnessed the accident happen 100 yds from where he was standing. We had been with this aircraft in Bellingham 30-40 minutes earlier. We flew VFR direct back to W-10 our home base while Josh and Carl filed IFR back to Boeing Field in their club Cardinal. We learned later that they reported engine trouble and declared an emergency. A witness on the ground further north heard loud backfiring and saw the a/c descending. W-10 is hard to find at the best of times and they approached the north-south runway from the west where the airfield is invisible until you are over it. By the time my student saw the aircraft pass over at low level, the prop was unfeathered and stopped. Seeing the airstrip perhaps for the first time, they made one 180 degree turn to come back over the field and then attempted one last 90 degree turn to line up with the runway. It was this last steep turn at very low level that caused the fatal stall. Sadly they passed over plenty of possible emergency landing sites along the way. We suspect they may have hit “nearest” on their GPS which would give them a track to the middle of W-10 and which, with everything else happening, focused them on seeking out a difficult to find airport they were unfamiliar with, rather than choosing an off airport option."

    and

    "Was Good VFR below the overcast layer except for that pesky mist developing right over our hard-to-spot airport. Sad they passed up so many off airport emergency landing sites in their determination to reach W-10. Maybe they were victims of their navigator’s “nearest” button.
    Pretty clear that the engine problem was not icing but maybe internal bearing or crankshaft failure. The prop was totally stopped and didn’t even move with the impact. Pulled out of the ground by NTSB, the blade that didn’t break off at impact was completely undamaged. And there was no visible damage to the cylinders or rocker arm covers. The wreckage is now down in Auburn for the investigation."
     
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  11. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    I do not envy the A&P in this case. I'll reframe from opinions
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2020
  12. AKBill

    AKBill En-Route

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    :fingerwag: Mellow out Tom
     
  13. denverpilot

    denverpilot Tied Down PoA Supporter

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    o_O
     
  14. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    Put a 'not' in the post.
     
  15. Tom-D

    Tom-D Taxi to Parking

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    that read
    I do not envy the A&P in this case. I'll reframe from opinions