Accident rates during instruction

Discussion in 'Pilot Training' started by Maui Cirrus CFII, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Maui Cirrus CFII

    Maui Cirrus CFII Ejection Handle Pulled

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  2. Acrodustertoo

    Acrodustertoo Pattern Altitude

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    Should have had an AOA......
     
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  3. SToL

    SToL Pre-Flight

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    OMG... Will the madness ever end!!!?
     
  4. Maui Cirrus CFII

    Maui Cirrus CFII Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Hey hey this is not an AoA report. Read it.
     
  5. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Yes, I read "The Killing Zone" which also shows primary training to be relatively safe compared to other times in a pilot's experience.
     
  6. Velocity173

    Velocity173 Final Approach

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    If those helicopters had AOA devices, their accident rate wouldn't have exceeded the airplane accident rate.
     
  7. Cajun_Flyer

    Cajun_Flyer Cleared for Takeoff

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    OK, I've got to give it to Hawaiian guy... his sales tactics are kind of genius. He doesn't even have to do his pitch anymore... he's got everyone doing it for him now!
     
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  8. SoCal RV Flyer

    SoCal RV Flyer Cleared for Takeoff

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    You get an A+ for persistence!
     
  9. Norman

    Norman En-Route

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    There was a flight school on field that kept our shop busy for years driving rivets and reassembling their planes. Nuff said.
     
  10. hindsight2020

    hindsight2020 Pattern Altitude

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    Flight training abuses the airplanes, but in general its a much more canned and supervised environment; less prone to fatal accidents by proxy ime. By no means does that mean its immune to fatalities or that one should utilize those nuances to get complacent.
     
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  11. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Quite the opposite. I would guess that students are less complacent. They are less likely to shortcut a pre-flight and less likely to fly into a cloud or take off in unfavorable conditions. The statistics appear to bear that out.
     
  12. hindsight2020

    hindsight2020 Pattern Altitude

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    The risk for complacency I was referring to was on the instructor s part.
     
  13. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    I suppose, like anything else, there are good instructors and bad ones. I have had both, but most of them have been good and seem to really care about doing things the right way. I would also argue, that it is on the student to make sure he has an instructor that is diligent. It could be argued that you don't know what you don't know, but often you can get a feel for the instructor and if it doesn't feel right, you should seek advice elsewhere.
     
  14. Zeldman

    Zeldman En-Route

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    Give these to your students to prevent "accidents"
    [​IMG]
     
  15. NoHeat

    NoHeat En-Route

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    "the rates of fatal accidents during flight instruction are less than half those on non-instructional flights. "

    That report does not break out statistics according to make of aircraft, but I recall seeing figures that showed the reverse situation for Cirrus accidents. Actually, it was for "maneuvering" instead of training: accidents while maneuvering were worse with an instructor on board than without. At least that's what I recall from a presentation by a CSIP. Nobody knew why it was so.
     
  16. mulligan

    mulligan Cleared for Takeoff

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    I love those things. Ordered a large case. Even put them in the car for when the kids can't hold it on car trips.
     
  17. mscard88

    mscard88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    For the kids, sureeeeeeeee! :D
     
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  18. azure

    azure Final Approach

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    I would argue that, since the instructor has skin in the game, he has a fairly strong incentive to keep an eagle eye on everything the student is doing, doing his own pre-flight before the student arrives, etc. The only time I can see an instructor getting complacent is when flying with an experienced pilot who is well past the student pilot stage and might even have some advanced ratings. And I've read several stories from CFIs who reported getting lax in their vigilance with high-time pilots and saying "never again" afterward.

    Not that I disagree with what you're saying: there are certainly less-conscientious instructors, and the student needs to be a vigilant customer as well. But I suspect the CFI who risks his and his student's lives through negligence is fairly rare in this context.
     
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  19. Sundancer

    Sundancer Cleared for Takeoff

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    Heresy here - after a few hundred hours, I think recency of experience is more important than total time. A 300 hour PPL who has flown 30 hours in the last month is probably handling the plane better than a 3,000 hour guy who has been off for six months. I mean real flying hours, of course, actual airplane handling, versus straight-and-level, autopilot, FMS, system monitoring flying - pure stick and rudder skills. The higher time guy likely will plan better, etc., of course.

    Total time is kinda relative - 10K in airlines, versus 1.5K in fighters, versus 500 hours crop dusting - they don't map the dame. . .