1 class certificate and exophoria

Discussion in 'Medical Topics' started by Gil, Dec 7, 2018.

  1. Gil

    Gil Guest

    Hello,

    Last week I had my first medical appointment with the AME and I failed the test that they ask you (which musical note number does the red line cross) The AME had me to take the 8500-7 form to my eye doctor. I took the form and my eye doctor did the eye evaluation and fax the form to the AME. The AME said that he will call the FAA to see what their judgement for my case would be. Two days later the AME called to tell me that he had to deferred the application due to being 8 on exophoria looking to an object at a distance of 18 inches, and that the FAA standard is 6 or less ( I don’t have symptoms of diplopia and my eye doctor wrote that on the 8500-7 form) and that I will be getting a letter from the FAA with instructions. He said that they will probably have me to do a medical flight test. My questions are these.
    1) when would I be getting this letter?
    2) how is this medical flight test and what should I expect on that flight?
    3) can I still get a 1 first medical certificate ( I want to fly in the airlines)

    I have read things about SODA.

    Thanks everyone.
     
  2. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    The original "I don't know it all" of aviation.
    Not an MD, nor and AME. Just one who pays attention to many of these medical questions.....

    Sorta surprised the AME didn't ask you to do a Humphrey visual field test. I sorta remember Dr. Bruce Chien (one of our resenting uber AME's) recommending this for visual issues not unlike yours.

    Answering the questions

    1) could be as long as short as 4 weeks, could be as long as 8-12 weeks. It is well known that AMCD reviewing staff is very overloaded. Simple answer is, "it will arrive when it arrives"

    2) In the letter will be language saying that they cannot grant your certification at this time for ____ reason(s). And then information that they will reconsider your application if you fulfill the requirements they list in the letter. Once you obtain all of the documentation and reports, you will go back to your AME with those items. IF he/she feels they meet the standard, he will complete the paperwork that clears you for the SODA ride. You then schedule this with the local FSDO. The inspector will then work you through the steps to satisfy the requirements of the FSDO. If you earn his satisfactory signature, then you go back to the AME who will guide you on sending the revised application packet to AMCD.

    3) Unable to comment. Deferring this question to Dr. Bruce or Dr. Lou (@bbchien or @lbfjrmd)
     
  3. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Since you're not working as a pilot (yet), expect 12+ weeks before anybody even looks at your application. After that Aggie is correct.
    The first class standard is "no break in fusion", once you bust 6 diopters of exophoria, the AME can't issue. Eight is called moderate convergence insufficiency. I don't think that visual fields would have helped this. They're going to want to see a report on what the pathology that's causing this and whether it's going to manifest in flight conditions.
     
  4. Gil

    Gil Guest

    Thanks for he response. The AME was able to speak to my eye doctor twice and the doctor told him that I do not have any eye pathology.
     
  5. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    The original "I don't know it all" of aviation.
    Okay, so that information was shared to the AME verbally (on the phone call), or also included in a written report of findings.

    What EXACTLY was said in the reports that was sent to AMCD??? This is something you should be knowing.

    Often issuance, deferral, and denial can depend on what the treating doctor provided in his/her report. @flyingron and former member Cap't Ron (Ron Levy) both have stories about various physicians including details in their exam reports that not only inaccurate, but caused lots of heartache and wrapping around the axle with the FAA.

    My point here is, if there was something in your eye doc's report that started your deferral. What was it? And why does what is in that report not meet the standards for issuance?

    The mantra around these parts is, "Own your medical". Meaning you must stay on top of what the FAA knows about you and your submissions to AMCD.
     
  6. flyingron

    flyingron Touchdown! Greaser!

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    He stated that it was the 8 diopters of exophoria. That would do it, the AME can only issue with less than six diopters (provided there's no abnormal pathology otherwise).
     
  7. AggieMike88

    AggieMike88 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Okay... but does that fit his statement of (AMCD and eye problems is something I'm still learning about)
     
  8. Chaperral

    Chaperral Filing Flight Plan

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    8 diopters of exophoria could very well be congenital, but seldom related to "eye pathology". Some patients tolerate this amount of exophoria without symptoms, others might have symptoms only when tired or in low light situations(night IFR). The amount of fusion reserve and how long this exophoria has been present are probably what the FAA are interested in as long as there is no eye or neurological pathology. If there are good fusion reserves and no symptoms, should be no problem.
     
  9. Gil

    Gil Guest

    5 years ago, I passed a first class medical with no issues of any kind. I had to stop training for a period of time and have resumed training recently. This most recent medical is the one that was deferred due to the finding of exophoria. On the eye evaluation report my eye doctor stated that there are no symptoms or history of diplopia. The AME said because there was a change from my previous medical he needed to ask the FAA.
     
  10. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Six is the field issuable limit. However if the airman has already had the ophthalmology strabismus evaluation, it is call OKC and issue if no diplopia in any field of gaze...