• Europe could no longer recognize FAA certificates for pilots

Discussion in 'Hangar Talk' started by John221us, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Europe could no longer recognize FAA certificates for pilots

    New Pilot Rules In Effect In Europe

    By Russ Niles, Editor-in-Chief


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    New rules for foreign pilots and foreign registered aircraft in Europe came into effect on Saturday and, depending on how member states of the European Union are implementing them, could mean that your FAA, Transport Canada or other pilot certificate or ratings are no longer recognized by the European Aviation Safety Agency. EASA Part FCL homogenizes crew licensing requirements in all EU states and essentially means that those who want to fly in the EU have to prove competence and compliance with EU rules, rather than just use the credentials of their home country. Depending on the kind of flying involved, it can be a time-consuming and costly endeavor to earn those flight privileges, particularly for IFR.


    In an editorial, German magazine Pilot und Flugzeug Editor Jan Brill says the new rule ignores acceptance of European qualifications in other GA nations and makes it costly and inconvenient for those licensed elsewhere to fly in Europe. "We insult our aviation-friends all over the world by rendering their certificates worthless, we repay the openness extended by nations such as Canada, Australia or the United States by pettiness and arrogance," Brill wrote. "To anyone who knows how to fly an aircraft, we're presenting Europe at it's very, very worst." Although the new rules theoretically took effect on April 8, some countries have implemented a two-year grace period.
     
  2. poadeleted20

    poadeleted20 Deleted

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    Not much in the way of facts. Anyone know what is really going on?
     
  3. Threefingeredjack

    Threefingeredjack En-Route

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    From what I got of the article even if you fly your own A/C over there you have to jump through their hoops and get a Euro license. Not an issue for me, I thought about flying my own plane to Europe, but swimming the last 950 miles had no appeal.
     
  4. John221us

    John221us En-Route

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    Would this also apply to European territories, such as in the Caribbean?
     
  5. Threefingeredjack

    Threefingeredjack En-Route

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    Good question.
     
  6. Jim Logajan

    Jim Logajan En-Route

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  7. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

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    This rule applies to people living in Europe and having a foreign (non European registered) aircraft and operating it based upon foreign Regulations and a Foreign pilot certificate.

    It does not mean a non European certificated pilot cannot fly in Europe ( such as a US pilot flying his aircraft).

    I believe we have one member here who has a US registered plane in England and he's flying on a US certificate. It's guys such as that this effects.
     
  8. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

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    How is "living in Europe" versus "Travelling through Europe" defined, I wonder? Does one have to be a resident?
     
  9. Jim Logajan

    Jim Logajan En-Route

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    My understanding is that the regulations are intended to stop European pilots from going outside the EU to get their training. It appears to have a few nasty side-effects.[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]

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  10. Piloto

    Piloto Line Up and Wait

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    Makes sense Jim. Half if not more of the students in south Florida are foreigners. Many comment that even including boarding and airline tickets is cheaper in the US than in Europe. Also more school planes available makes for a quicker training.

    José
     
  11. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

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    They can go outside for their training, but to live and operate there (Europe) then they must get an EASA certificate.

    There are a few flight schools in the US and around the world that offer courses to obtain the EASA certificates.
     
  12. Jim Logajan

    Jim Logajan En-Route

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    I did not know that. Is the cost still comparable to getting a US certificate?
     
  13. Everskyward

    Everskyward Administrator Management Council Member

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    Does the US allow foreign registered aircraft flown by foreign certificated pilots to be based here?
     
  14. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

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    Yes...
     
  15. Henning

    Henning Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Same crap it sounds like with mariner licenses. I doubt if there is anything to the non acceptance for flying though, but you never know. The problem is there would be no way to retaliate since most European pilots have a FAA ticket since they trained here.
     
  16. sballmer

    sballmer Pre-Flight

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    That would hit the wrong guys anyway. It's not European pilots that are the problem, it's the European politicians.
     
  17. Bob Noel

    Bob Noel Touchdown! Greaser!

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    If retaliation is called for, how about dumping the ICAO weather codes/abbreviations?
     
  18. Palmpilot

    Palmpilot Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Earth to Europe:

    The ONLY way to get European pilots to get their training in Europe, IMO, is to stop doing everything they possibly can to make it exorbitantly expensive to train there! :rolleyes:
     
  19. JesseD

    JesseD Line Up and Wait

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    Didn't all this crap get started over a year (or 2) ago? Something about a ****ing contest with the FAA certifying European repair stations, and the EASA responding by threatening US training?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  20. RotorAndWing

    RotorAndWing Final Approach

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    Not really.

    Why do Europeans get a US certificate and register the airplane in the US? It's about money.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  21. mbundy

    mbundy Pre-Flight

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    It's about money. As usual, the French are behind this with their classic 'revenue via regulation' tactics. Too bad the FAA will not reciprocate...

    --
    Is it 2013 yet?
     
  22. Henning

    Henning Ejection Handle Pulled

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    Ahhh, that makes a lot more sense. It's likely wrapped around their requirements on maintaining their Instrument Rating vs. ours. The Brits love their taxes.
     
  23. Shorrick Mk2

    Shorrick Mk2 Pre-Flight

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    Actually the French are against this. They've looked at the proposed EASA IR rating, deemed it too complicated for the average private pilot (who needs to bother with airline IR stuff? ), raised the middle finger, and created a stand-alone French en-route IR.

    Actually it appears that after a lot of to and fro, the relevant EASA committee has eventually been instructed to start over again from scratch, this time inspiring themselves from "best practices available abroad" (i.e. the FAA...)... so much for tax money being "wisely" spent these past years...
     
  24. kontiki

    kontiki Cleared for Takeoff

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  25. Henning

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    The Aussies have similar, they have a Command Instrument Rating required for commercial IR flight, and a lesser Private Instrument Rating of which I never met anyone with. Aussie non airline pilots don't fly IFR, most of them aren't even rated for night. Aussie's don't want you in the clouds so they give you "except under Press of Weather" exclusions to all your cloud clearances and minimum altitudes. That was one thing I liked about the Aussie flying system, they think like I do, people who aren't flying instruments regularly (multiple times monthly), you're better off not.