Zero Hours to Airlines / ATP Flight School

Discussion in 'Flight Following' started by bqmassey, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. bqmassey

    bqmassey Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Messages:
    632
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Brandon
    I'd like to hear some opinions from all of you.

    I'm 21 years old. I don't have a private certificate, but have studied for it for many years and have a lot of PC simulator time. I'm trying to figure out the best way to earn all of my ratings and pursue a career as an airline pilot for a regional airline. Presently, I am considering two options:

    1.) Attend the University of Nebraska—Kearney to earn a four-year degree in Airway Science. Earned ratings would include IFR and multi-engine commercial. CFI would be optional. Over the four years, I'd probably accrue $30,000-$45,000 in loans. I would have to find entry-level, part-time work and somewhere to live in a town about two hours from where I currently live. At the end of the program, I probably won't have many more hours over what is required for the ratings and would have to earn them on my own afterwards. It could easily be six years before I have enough hours to get in with a regional airline. At that point, I'd probably still need expensive transition training. I'd then start, age 27, at the typical first officer salary of somewhere around $20,000/year.


    2.) Attend ATP Flight School [[SIZE=-1]www.atpflightschool.com[/SIZE]] to earn all of my ratings. I'd have to take out a loan for around $55,000. This would take about six months. I'd spend another six months to a year instructing for ATP. Housing would be included. I'd get CRJ training at a large discount while instructing. After this, I'd be employable by a regional airline. I'd start at a painfully low salary my first year, but by the time I would get into the airlines via method 1 above, I'd be making decent money. Once I'm working for a regional airline, I'll do what I can to earn my four year degree in preperation for application to larger airlines.


    Both options have the flexibility of entering with a PPL or start with zero hours.

    I really am at a crossroads here, and would appreciate your advice.

    Thanks,
    Brandon
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2007
  2. flyersfan31

    flyersfan31 Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    14,280
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Freiburgfan31
    Do you have a college degree now?

    Frankly, I'm skeptical of those 4yr degrees. I think lots of folks on this board are skeptical of the ATP-like programs.

    Cheapest route might be - scrimp/flip burgers for PPL, Comm. Then fly jumpers or dust crops to build hours (tho' I suspect crop dusting may require more xper -- Henning?)

    Other opinions may vary. All I know is what I read.
     
  3. jesse

    jesse Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2005
    Messages:
    15,583
    Location:
    Lincoln, NE
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jesse
    Not really a business you just walk into. Mostly family run.

    It's going to come down to learning a whole different kind of flying, getting some tail wheel time, and meeting the right people. Not really an option for most.
     
  4. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,309
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tony
    I like to recommend the way i did it because, well, its the way I did it. If you are considering UNO, you are close enough to consider Iowa Lakes Community College. Its a part 141 school in Estherville, Iowa. I can probably hook you up with an apartment and job there. Just happens to be where I did my training. Yes, its only a 2 year degree. Guess what? that means you will get your ratings twice as fast. Then transfer to a 4 year school and work as a part time CFI while finishing a 4 yr degree in something you can make a living off of when your flying gig doesnt work out. Backup plan is essential. Most 4 yr aviation schools need to start offering a class in "do you need fries with that"

    www.iowalakes.edu

    Ron Duer is the Chief Flight Instructor up there. Phone number for the Flight Center is 712-362-7904. PM me if you have any more questions.
     
  5. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,065
    Location:
    Bolingbrook, IL
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Bruce C
    Get the bachelor's. When you medical takes a dump, you'll be able to not be on disability public assistance and medicaid. I kid you not. It sucks.

    I take care of all sorts of folks who thought their bodies could cut it.
     
  6. bqmassey

    bqmassey Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Messages:
    632
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Brandon
    I don't have a college degree right now, I have about a year of credit hours at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln.

    The problem with paying for ratings as I go is that it will be a very long time before I'm able to pay for enough hours to get picked up by the airlines. That's a LOT of lost salary.

    Thank you very much info! I'll take a look at that.

    Oh, I'll be health for a while. :D Hopefully.

    At UNK I would end up with an Aviation degree, anyways. Not something I that would be incredibly useful if my medical did get denied down the road.

    If I go through ATP, I'll start working on my four year degree during when I'm finished training.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2007
  7. KennyFlys

    KennyFlys Guest

    I'm no expert but... given the stability of the airline industry as well as potential for setbacks even when you advance up the ranks, I'd suggest getting a good education you can always fall back on in the event a furlough puts flying for a major out of reach for some time.

    Do your flight training at a local school along with the college education. Make it either a smaller career program or one associated with a college. There are many options along with various colleges across the country. Perhaps a few who have gone to such schools will make recommendations.

    As far as ATP, I've never heard anything positive about them. I looked at them here in Atlanta and was not impressed. I personally know a guy who went to one location and dealt with so many aircraft maintenance issues, he walked out. You need to make your own choice but I'd never go.

    There are many furloughed pilots from after 9/11 who never went back when recalled. Some went to other industries, some stuck with regionals where things were more stable. I read of one guy who went to medical school and is now a resident. Pursue your dream but do so with a cushion.
     
  8. CJones

    CJones En-Route

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    Messages:
    4,860
    Location:
    Jawjuh
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    uHaveNoIdea
    I was at the very same crossroads a few years ago. At the time, I was pursuing a career in professional aviation and, like you, didn't have (much) time and no 4-year degree.

    I'm sure you will get tons of useful info from people who have walked the walk and can talk the talk, but I'll just share a few tidbits I discovered during my investigation process:

    1.) When I was looking into working up into the airlines, the advice I was given was to get a 4-year degree of SOME kind. Apparently the 'major' airlines basically require a 4-year degree to move up in the interview process. It is possible to get a seat with the regional carriers without the degree, but that limits your future career opportunities. Not only does it help you move up in the airline seniority ladder, it also gives you something to fall back on if the need arises.

    2.) The ratings are the same, regardless of where you get them. The ratings you get from Mom & Pop FBO in Podunk, NE are the same ratings you get from "Super Duper Pilot School" in Big City, USA -- they are all issued by the FAA and all meet the same competency standards - although there are different 61 vs 141 school time requirements. The airlines don't really care about 'where' you get the ratings, they are more concerned with hours and experience.

    3.) Be prepared to live on Ramen noodles and kool-aid for the first several years. Intro seats are pretty much 'survival grade' pay scale.

    4.) Enjoy the view! If you can stick it out through the low rungs on the ladder, the view from the top isn't too bad. :)

    Of course I am only relaying info I learned from others - I gave up on the idea of flying the big iron due to lack of funds to earn the ratings.

    Now stand back and let the wise sages of the board give you some REAL and USEFUL info. :D
     
  9. bqmassey

    bqmassey Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Messages:
    632
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Brandon
    I hear what you're saying. Airline job security could be unstable for quite some time. But if something doesn't work out, I can always go back to being a CFI or flying charter. Basically what I will have skipped in the first place if I went the traditional route (learning at an FBO). I'll be working on my four year ASAP when I'm finished at ATP. That's the plan anyways.

    Lol. I'm practically living the Ramen lifestyle now, working full time at a local FBO.

    Being a pilot is really what I want to do. Even if it doesn't work out in the airlines, the time I do spend there certainly would be beneficial in finding a good charter job or working in aviation management. (I'd like to get a business degree once I'm working.)

    I'd like to fly air ambulance, too.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2007
  10. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,309
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tony
    like i said, get the aviation degree and repeat after me:

    "would you like fries with that?"
     
  11. bqmassey

    bqmassey Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Messages:
    632
    Location:
    Central Oregon
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Brandon

    :D I truly respect your opinion, and that of the other legends that are replying tonight.

    It definitely gives me something to think about.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2007
  12. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,309
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tony
    legends? bruce, yes. me chris and jesse are just legends in our own mind though...
     
  13. KennyFlys

    KennyFlys Guest

    His what? :D
     
  14. skyflyer8

    skyflyer8 Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2006
    Messages:
    963
    Location:
    Florence, KY
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Kate
    Sorry, I can't help it:

    A young man hired by a supermarket reported for his first day of work. The manager greeted him with a warm handshake and a smile, gave him a broom and said, "Your first job will be to sweep out the store."

    "But I'm a college graduate," the young man replied indignantly.

    "Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't know that," said the manager. "Here, give me the broom... I'll show you how."
    :rofl:

    That said, I wish I would have earned a two-year aviation degree through a tech college and then transferred to a four-year school to finish a bachelor's degree. It would have saved me tons of money compared to the four-year program I chose. (Tech school = cheaper than private college tuition.) Also it would have let me instruct after two years instead of the five it took me to make it through a liberal arts type college program. I think the quicker you get the flying done, the better... but be wary of anything that seems too good to be true. I also have not heard good things about ATP. But I don't know from firsthand experience.

    Good luck in your journey, Brandon, whatever path you take. And keep us all informed.
     
  15. Everskyward

    Everskyward Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2005
    Messages:
    31,501
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Everskyward
    I have a little different perspective about that because I have a degree in "something else" (actually it's in Landscape Architecture), not because I was concerned about having something to fall back on, but because I hadn't yet decided that I wanted to be a pilot. If I lost my medical I'm sure I couldn't apply for a job in that field today without being laughed out the door since my degree is 25+ years old, not to mention the fact that I have no interest in it. I'd probably be more successful finding a non-flying job in aviation.

    Once you've been out of school for a while I think your current experience counts a lot more than whatever you did in college.

    I'm not one to give advice one way or the other, but it's just something to think about.
     
  16. CowboyPilot

    CowboyPilot Guest

    I'm going to be brutal, but honest. . .

    "Career" and "regional airline" don't ever belong in the same sentence. So forget the propoganda you hear from the ticket mills and the flash you see in the av rags.

    Get your degree. Whatever you do, GET YOUR DEGREE. Getting your degree doesn't guarantee to open every door, but NOT having it will guarantee shutting many doors.

    A. There is no guarantee whatsoever you'll even get picked up by the regionals.

    B. Paying as you go often also translates into "learning as you go." A GOOD (aviation) employer is equally interested in the variance, depth and quality of your experience moreso than which ticket mill stamped "Grad-ee-ated" on your ratings ticket. And the difference between "good" aviation outfits and the rest is like the difference between flying that PC simulator you have versus flying the real thing. One will actually get you someplace while the other never goes anywhere.

    Leaving your future to "hopefully" versus taking control of your future is the difference between success and failure.

    What will you do if when you're mowing the yard, you catch a rock in the eye--instantly lose your First Class? No decent degree. . . hello, furlough.

    How about a car wreck? Out of the cockpit for a year. . . may never be fit to pass your First Class again.

    In my old job in the military, we were drilled to always have a contigency plan. You wouldn't dream of flying IFR in actual without alternate airports, would you? Why would you essentially consider doing the same thing with your life/career?

    Wait a second. I thought the plan was get your ATP at the ticket mill, then start delivering pizzas while pulling CFI duty. When are you gonna have the time to work on your four-degree, let alone find the money to pay for it?

    First off, airline job security for any driver with less than around fifteen years IS unstable--not "could be for quite some time." It IS unstable and it's going to be unstable for decades to come.

    My company has a client that is a well-recognized Airline. We are heavily involved in personnel operations. What they are doing to prosper and survive is almost the polar opposite of what the ATP type schools and snake-oil salesman are advising you to do.

    They will not even glance at your (pilot) application without the following:

    1. Four-year college degree, preferably in Business.

    2. Minimum of 1500 hours PIC

    3. Minimum of 150 hours actual IMC

    4. Minimum of 500 hours night.

    5. Type rating for their primary aircraft.

    They have a waiting list that exceeds five years, at present. They are not untypical.

    Chris and Doc Bruce have given you THE best advice and the most realistic advice you will get.

    Here is my advice:

    http://www.usafa.af.mil/index.cfm?catname=AFA Homepage

    http://www.usna.edu///homepage.php

    https://secure.military.com/Recruiting/request-info/rotc/page1.do?ESRC=ggl_rec_rotc.kw&partner=7

    All three take some determination to get into. All three will help you acquire a SUPERB four-year education that will be respected by virtually any employer in the United States. They do not guarantee you a flying job, but they do guarantee you a good paying job.

    Something to think about.

    Good luck.

    Regards.

    -JD
     
  17. wby0nder

    wby0nder Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    1,061
    Location:
    Iowa
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matt Michael
    Well since this is LEDGENDS night I'll chime in...

    What Tony is saying about 2year school for ratings then transferring to finish at 4 year while instructing looks to me like the best option. I can tell you that Tony is making it work really well and he has a lot of options for cool flying gigs while working in his "spare time" on the engineering degree. When he finishes his degree he will be able to get a great engineering job or fly charter, corporate, airline, instruct, go to test pilot school, or all of the above. It's really a great end result that gives you the least risk, most flying, and the best job opportunities to pay back loans and have fun.

    Hey, you aren't far from Ames. You should come over here some weekend (maybe the glider weekend when we'll be chock full of ledgends) and hang out with us. Tony is a real regular guy if I kick his ass every now and then.

    Oops, I shouldn't have said that... I should have said Kiss instead

    Matt Michael
    "A ledgend who's boots I'm not worthy to lick, no, more than just a ledgend, the supremely incomparable human being... Harry Fink"
     
  18. cwyckham

    cwyckham Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2006
    Messages:
    535
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    cwyckham
    I'm also a big fan of having a backup plan, and I think a bachelor's is part of that. As JD pointed out, doing a bachelor's degree is a big deal. It takes a lot of time and money. Saying you'll "fit it in somehow" while flying for the regionals seems pretty unrealistic to me.

    Airlines aren't the only employers who want you to have a degree but don't care which one. All those philosophy majors have to be working for somebody. And not all degrees have an 'expiry date' on them (though some certainly do). The most important thing will be to do something that interests you so you don't go insane in the first six months.

    I'd think really hard about Tony's route.

    Chris
     
  19. wby0nder

    wby0nder Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    1,061
    Location:
    Iowa
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matt Michael
    My last post came up after JD's but before reading JD's

    I bet he knows what the heck he's talking about.

    I've got some airline pals.

    One was an USAF T38 instructor who became 747 captain. Laid-off after 911. Now in Vet school.

    Another went through crop dusting, instructing, Alaska bush pilot, F16 instructor pilot, airline. Now in year FIFTEEN as MD80 first officer with so much job security he's shopping for an Ag Cat.

    MM
     
  20. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,309
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tony
    go to Iowa Lakes and Ill get you the job delivering pizzas while you are training. Get that part knocked out early! :)

    I really like the position I am in aviation wise as well. Ill graduate as an Aerospace Engineer with >2000 TT and about 5 yrs as a CFI. Experience in everything from single seat gliders to pressurized twins will hopefully help me out.

    And you should come to the glider weekend! March 31st/April 1st. There is a thread entitled "PoA Glide a thon" in the Cool Places to Fly forum. Check it out.
     
  21. wby0nder

    wby0nder Cleared for Takeoff

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    1,061
    Location:
    Iowa
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Matt Michael
     
  22. tonycondon

    tonycondon Gastons CRO (Chief Dinner Reservation Officer)

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Messages:
    15,309
    Location:
    Wichita, KS
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tony
    now I know why you wanted that huge "baggage" area!

    yum
     
  23. flyingcheesehead

    flyingcheesehead Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Messages:
    19,616
    Location:
    UQACY, WI
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    iMooniac
    Here's one for ya.

    You're old enough to get a Commercial Driver's License (CDL). It's really quite easy. Yell if you want more info.

    Once you do that, you work at that while you're getting your ratings on the weekends. If you work for the right company (NOT Schneider, Swift, JB Hunt, etc.) you can make nearly $40,000 the first year and over $50,000 the second year, and have enough home time to do lots of flying. I do about 120 hours/year but I'm just flying for the heck of it. You should be able to have both the time and money to get your commercial in about a year if you play your cards right.

    So, in two years you could probably have your commercial, multi, CFII, MEI as well as have some money in the bank.

    The best part: No debt.

    The other best part: No ramen. ;)

    So, once you have the ratings and a cool 10 grand safety net in the bank, THEN you go to school while working as a CFI. Since many CFI's don't have the dough to get their MEI or even just a multi rating, you'll get more multi students if you go someplace that has a twin available for instruction. That will be key to your upward mobility in the industry. 1500TT/500 Multi seems to be the magic number.

    Did I mention no debt? And that you'll have some money in the bank to fall back on? And not only will you have a 4-year degree to fall back on, you'll also have the CDL to fall back on if things get really bad.

    Just a sick and twisted idea from the resident commercial driver trainer. :D
     
  24. Everskyward

    Everskyward Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2005
    Messages:
    31,501
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Everskyward
    This is not as far fetched as one might think. I know of at least a couple pilots who would switch back and forth between driving a truck and driving an airplane depending on the employment situation at the time. After all, there are a lot of similarities.
     
  25. dogman

    dogman Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    254
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    dogman
    I have a best friend who is a 777 captain for American Airlines flyin international. He was just telling me yesterday that most of the Captains at AA he meet are all military. Very few like him. Small fbo Crop dusting and working up.

    He also has told me many times that he would not try to become a pilot in todays market. He would go to school and make more money so he could own and fly his own plane when he wanted. Like I have done.
    At 58 He just bought his first piece of land ( 80acres) and 1/2 an airplane. At 41 I own 2 airplanes and many acres.
    I sold him his land and half an airplane.
    The other thing he tells me is that flying the big iron has become more like driving the city bus. Thats is the way the company and passengers treat you. "After all that time rating hard work all the Glory is not really what you think it will be and you can lose your job in a blink of an eye"

    Find some captains that have lost there Med. My friend is an a commity for the union and helps pilots find new jobs that are furlowed or lost med.
    There are many every week that he helps. Now that is just at American.
    Many pilots with lots of experience. Pooring concrete, working construction....................

    Just take a good hard look at it
     
  26. SCCutler

    SCCutler Administrator Management Council Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Messages:
    16,162
    Location:
    Dallas
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Spike Cutler

    ...not to mention, the Lot Lizards! :vomit:
     
  27. ScottM

    ScottM Taxi to Parking

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    42,518
    Location:
    Variable, but somewhere on earth
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    iBazinga!
    A buddy of mine who is a 767 driver for AA has his CDL. He drives the school bus each day for extra dough and for something to do while he awaits the beeper to go off.
     
  28. AuntPeggy

    AuntPeggy Final Approach

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
    Messages:
    8,450
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Namaste
    You have a lot of great advice here. Let me re-iterate some of it.

    1. First priority is get a degree. Start with a 2-year, then transfer to a 4-year school. Back in the middle-ages when I did it, the cost difference between 2-year community and 4-year university was 10-fold and the university accepted all but 1 course.

    2. Second priority is get a good paying job to eliminate or reduce the student loans. Truck driving is good. Construction is another. Whatever you can do that takes advantage of your health and strengths and pays you well is good. Burger flipping is a last choice.

    3. Get flying lessons at the local FBO. Hang around the friendliest ones you can find and let people know you want to learn and fly. Some of those old nn,000 hour guys with no medical may be wanting to find a young pup with a medical to fly with. A student pilot I know ended up flying a twin up and down the East Coast once a month with a guy who appreciated having the enthusiastic company.

    4. There's a lot of commercial flying out there other than regionals and majors. Hang around more than one airport and talk to all the guys who come in an out. Hey, you have a car, give them a ride to the burger place.

    5. Be grateful.
     
  29. N7702Y

    N7702Y Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2007
    Messages:
    67
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Jay Hulbert
    Go to school, go directly to school, and get your bachelor's degree.

    Get a good summer job. Construction, driving, living in the west many of my friends worked on fire crews (it's tough, tough work, but it pays well).

    Work on flying in your spare time, then after you are through school think about a concentrated effort to get your advanced ratings.

    Don't ignore corporate aviation. The hours are irregular, but the pay is good and flying a Gulfstream for P&G wouldn't be bad duty.

    GOod luck!

    Jay
     
  30. Ken Ibold

    Ken Ibold Final Approach

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    5,511
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Ken Ibold
    You do not yet have a PPL and yet you KNOW you want to be an airline pilot. My wife's sister KNEW she wanted to be an airline pilot. She and her husband fought hard to make it happen. Bought a Bonanza and logged hours. Bought a Baron and logged multi hours. She landed an interview and then a commuter job with American Airlines. Six weeks later she quit. It was not, she discovered, what she thought it would be.

    At your age, keep your options open. You never know what may jump up and grab you.
     
  31. TMetzinger

    TMetzinger Final Approach

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Messages:
    9,885
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    Tim
    If you're a young out-of-work airline pilot with no college degree, you'll be limited to jobs you can do with your flight certificates (assuming your medical is valid) or you can start your own business.

    Getting a formal education (note that I did NOT say a degree) either before, or during your flight training will make a HUGE difference in your options later. After some years in the workforce, your experience (particularly in a leadership role) matters more than your education, provided you actually got an education. So whether it's management classes, liberal arts at the local community college, or something else, you should be working on establishing some breadth in your skills and experiences while you establish some depth in aviation.

    The military (even if non aviation) is a great way to get an equivalent "education". You walk out as a trained specialist or NCO and employers love it - you've shown that you can function on a team, accept and give discipline, and have the gumption to achieve.

    Working in a trade (as Kent mentioned) is also a good way to build up a nest egg and a launch pad for a flying career.

    Do NOT get married, and do NOT have children until you're established doing what you enjoy. There's nothing worse than feeling like you're stuck doing something you hate to take care of those you love.
     
  32. bkreager

    bkreager Pre-takeoff checklist

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    296
    Location:
    here and there...
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    RedTail
    I echo other's comments here. . . worry about the degree first. My route is quite similar to Tony's, I went to a community college where I went from no flight time to CFII in two years. Now I instruct at a local FBO and take night classes at a university towards my bachelors. Whether you want to go to airlines or not is your own choice, and remember that you can change your mind. When I started school I thought that I really wanted to work for the airlines, but after talking to some pilots and seeing some of my friends become corporate pilots, I'm definitely going the corporate route now. Obviously it depends on what company you work for, but both of my friends work for good places that treat them well. As for ATP, I went there to get my comm multi add-on, and I wasn't impressed. Poor training and being given less flight time than what I paid for rank at the top of my gripe list. From what I've heard, quality of training can vary between locations drastically. I would recommend staying away from there unless you already had a degree and had your heart set on the airlines. One instructor I had there got hired on with ASA with only 450 total time. The catch is that he had 400 multi hours, ATP has hiring agreements with certain airlines, and it was contingent upon successful completion of the regional jet standards certification program.
     
  33. Pjsmith

    Pjsmith Line Up and Wait

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    513
    Location:
    Cary, Illinois
    Display Name:

    Display name:
    pjsmith
    Among all of the options you are considering pursuing, an education is the only one which can't be taken away from you.