Why is BiPolar disqualifying?

Discussion in 'Medical Topics' started by Unregistered, Jul 6, 2015.

  1. James331

    James331 Touchdown! Greaser!

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    Having dated a bipolar girl once, though it’s not common when there is a swing, yeah not something you want to have happen in the cockpit.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2018
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  2. Half Fast

    Half Fast En-Route

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    Or while flying an airplane, either.

    (Wait, is that what you meant?)
     
  3. Kenny Phillips

    Kenny Phillips Pattern Altitude

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    Same, it was terrifying, and oddly, she was a mental health professional. I got outta there fast, luckily before we flew together.
     
  4. JOhnH

    JOhnH Touchdown! Greaser! PoA Supporter

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    Having unknowingly hired a bipolar girl one time, I will attest to that. She was fine for a year or more, (slow as molasses, but psychologically fine). Then one of her co-workers told me she was stopping her meds, which I didn't even know she was taking. About a week later we she had a melt down on the clinic floor and we had to call the cops and an ambulance.

    Let her fly a plane? UhUh.
     
  5. Anon

    Anon Guest

    That's the thing I struggle with, is I have also gone the past 2 years without incident and without medication. During that time I successfully graduated from college while working part-time, and now relocated, got married, and am working a full-time job. Stress from school was deemed to be my trigger, but I have very effectively managed how I evaluate stress and react to it. Even the 4 years before these past two, there was no issue that I had off medicine, and I was working 2 part-time jobs to save to buy a house while going to school (my junior year).

    It's frustrating being labeled with this, that I can manage it effectively with out taking any medications on the disapproved list, yet automatically be deferred or denied due to this diagnosis.
     
  6. SkyDog58

    SkyDog58 Ejection Handle Pulled PoA Supporter

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    If you are bipolar.
     
  7. Rushie

    Rushie Pattern Altitude

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    You're in your mid twenties? If your symptoms were mild, there is a slight chance you may be one of the few who "overcome" "bipolar" and for whom it isn't a lifelong condition, I'll link you to the article below, but it is my SGOTI-qualified opinion that those cases are likely a misdiagnosis. True bipolar is a lifelong condition.

    I'm not an AME or the FAA but I believe you have zero chance of medical certification unless you can prove that this was a gross misdiagnosis which it may be but the fact remains if it isn't bipolar, what is it? Something caused the symptoms. You would still be left with that something which might also be uncertifiable with the FAA. And disproving the diagnosis would require thousands of dollars of psychiatric testing with no guarantee you'll get the result you want.

    In your mid twenties it's far too soon to assume you've got it all under control and that you will continue to handle stress well and remain stable without medication. I hope you do and I understand your frustration. I'm not saying you should give up if you have a dream to fly, just trying to lay out reality for you and that reality is it's a very long and unlikely shot. Remember you can still fly airplanes, you just can't solo. It can be fun to take lessons with an instructor for the adventure of it.

    I have a niece with bipolar and she went through a similar frustration in her early twenties. She wanted to get a PhD but it turned out she could not handle college at all. She ended up marrying and now has two children and she has turned out to be one of the best mothers I've ever known, as long as she stays on her meds. Her husband has professional training and experience dealing with people with mental disorders. She also has a large extended family. They all keep her in check and on her meds. She has a huge heart and is very good at caregiving; one of her past jobs was taking care of elderly in a nursing home. So she found her niche, her purpose in life and her talent which is to love and nurture those who need it. It wasn't her destiny be a professor.

    Likewise we all have to get to that whether we have bipolar or not. It's very likely being a pilot is not your destiny but you will find what it is.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/bipolar-you/201206/can-bipolar-disorder-be-cured
     
  8. Salty

    Salty En-Route PoA Supporter

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    Sounds like you were misdiagnosed to me.
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Not the OP (or part of this thread), but I’ve now had two doctors state I was clearly misdiagnosed, despite being on meds for 2+ years. The original doc just “couldn’t get the dosage right for me”, which is why they weren’t working and I didn’t know any better... (nor did my parents, as I was a minor at the time). Trying to undo this is stressful as there isn’t a “one size fits all” answer, and this could ground me as a sport pilot if this doesn’t go my way, so I’ve taken the option of fly as an SP and see if any rule changes help me (for now).