Study Material

Discussion in 'Aerobatics' started by Seth.A, Oct 3, 2021.

  1. Seth.A

    Seth.A Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2020
    Messages:
    67

    Display name:
    Seth.A
    I just signed on for a week of training at Patty Wagstaffs school in Florida. I've got her course from Sportys and Basic Aerobatics by Szurovy and Goulian. I have zero aerobatic, tail wheel or even HP experience. I'm looking for things I can do / read / etc. now that will help me make the most of my time in FL. I've got until mid December so plenty of time for study.

    So, what resources would you recommend a newbe check out before such a course?
     
  2. RoscoeT

    RoscoeT Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,681

    Display name:
    RoscoeT
    Nothing really, yet. Seriously, just show up and listen. This will be very fundamental, basic training. No need to pre-study. If you end up really stoked about continuing acro, keep getting training and pick up Alan Cassidy’s book ‘Better Aerobatics’. Bar far the best acro book available. And relax and have fun.
     
  3. PaulS

    PaulS Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    11,921
    Location:
    New England

    Display name:
    PaulS
    Do some pireps, I did upset training with Goulian Aviation, had a blast. Just stay relaxed, take the controls immediately when offered. While the upset training I took is not an aerobatics course, in addition to tons of spins, I got to do loops, aileron rolls, plus I had the instructor do a hammer head, he hit 6.6 g's pulling out of that in an Extra 300. It was awesome, I'm thinking doing the Wagstaff program.
     
  4. Seth.A

    Seth.A Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2020
    Messages:
    67

    Display name:
    Seth.A
    Will do for sure.
     
    PaulS likes this.
  5. iamtheari

    iamtheari Administrator Management Council Member PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2016
    Messages:
    3,013

    Display name:
    Ari
    The only thing I can think of to do would be to fly a whole bunch. Especially if you have a taildragger to fly or want to spend a lot of time working on all the kinds of stalls and steep turns. The better you have those basics down, the easier the aerobatics will come to you.
     
  6. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2005
    Messages:
    11,530
    Location:
    Bolingbrook, IL

    Display name:
    Bruce C
    Turn About a Point. Duane Cole.
     
  7. Seth.A

    Seth.A Pre-Flight

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2020
    Messages:
    67

    Display name:
    Seth.A
    Roll About a Point? must be a good book at that price!
     
  8. Dana

    Dana Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2016
    Messages:
    2,248
    Location:
    CT & NY

    Display name:
    Dana
    There are always a few Amazon sellers putting absurd prices on things going to get lucky on out of print titles, but there are a couple of other deniers who have it for under $50. It is a good book, and an excellent intro to aerobatics.
     
    Seth.A likes this.
  9. RoscoeT

    RoscoeT Pattern Altitude

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,681

    Display name:
    RoscoeT
    The old timers always mention it but it’s really just one of the first acro books laying out some fundamental concepts that don’t change and newer books fully cover. Don’t go spending a fortune for its rarity nostalgia factor. Cassidy’s book makes nearly all of them obsolete.
     
  10. bbchien

    bbchien Touchdown! Greaser!

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2005
    Messages:
    11,530
    Location:
    Bolingbrook, IL

    Display name:
    Bruce C
    Sorry, I’m An old guy.I learned with that book..
     
    Seth.A likes this.
  11. Jeff Oslick

    Jeff Oslick En-Route PoA Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    4,287
    Location:
    Fullerton, CA

    Display name:
    Jeff Oslick
    Rich Stowell has some great material: https://www.richstowell.com/

    I got more out of a couple hours of stall/spin training with Rich than I had from ~15 years and several instructors before him.

    My only advice is to always be aware where you looking for reference (they should teach you this). Once I got used to looking out of the airplane in directions you don't normally spend much time looking out, spins and unusual attitudes became considerably easier for me, and I became less susceptible to queasiness from spins/aerobatic maneuvers.
     
    Ed Haywood and Seth.A like this.